The Deep Blue Sea
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2011 | 2010 | 2008

1-20 of 88 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Bringing along Baby: Going wailing in The Deep Blue Sea

13 December 2011 1:49 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Esther Walker and daughter Kitty watch Rachel Weisz hit the self-destruct button at a parent-and-baby screening. But their affections are split: one prefers Tom Hiddleston while the other would opt for Simon Russell Beale

A foul and wild day for a nearly deserted showing of The Deep Blue Sea. An indication, probably, that smug mummies don't want to look at Rachel Weisz chewing the furniture for 98 minutes; we want, mostly, to see Ryan Gosling with no clothes on. I hear rumours that there was standing room only at the Baby Club showing of The Ides of March.

"She," I said to Kitty, pointing at the screen, "could have been your mummy." I refer to my husband's – possibly crazed – tale that he was invited to Rachel Weisz's house for a date after interviewing her for Tatler magazine about a hundred years ago. But fate had other plans for both of them. »

- Esther Walker

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Arthur Christmas makes its presents felt at the box office

6 December 2011 8:03 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Aardman's festive film knocks Twilight off the top of the tree while fending off Happy Feet Two and Hugo; and Margaret proves to be a one-screen wonder

The festive battle

Despite experiencing the first dip in takings in its run so far, Arthur Christmas nabs the top spot for the first time in its four weeks of release, knocking off The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1. Shrugging off the challenge of two major new releases targeting the same family audience – Happy Feet Two and Hugo – the festive Aardman animation fell a mild 25%. Its cumulative total of £11.48m is already more than five times its opening weekend gross (£2.11m), with plenty of life in it yet.

Arthur Christmas is following a very similar pattern to Disney's A Christmas Carol, which likewise released in early November, and stood at £11.33m after its fourth weekend, on its way to a total of more than £20m. »

- Charles Gant

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Terence Rattigan, the poet of repression

2 December 2011 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Terence Rattigan's masterpiece The Deep Blue Sea, now adapted for the screen, was based on an affair between men. He was not the only writer to change a character's sex

Terence Rattigan was the great playwright of restraint, which means, of course, that he was obsessed with the prospect of passion breaking out. There is no more fervent champion of sexual obsession than the puritan, and no more convincing exponent of the destructive power of passionate emotion than the poet of repression. Rattigan's great subjects are what may not be spoken about; what may be concealed; and the moments when people – particularly English people – find it impossible to say what they feel. These are subjects often ascribed to Noel Coward, but Brief Encounter is broad and explicit compared to the best of Rattigan. Consider, for instance, the great scene in the Raf movie The Way to the Stars, the »

- Philip Hensher

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Rachel Weisz on Working with Malick

2 December 2011 9:50 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Sitting down with Rachel Weisz recently to discuss her role as a 1950s English adulteress in Terence Davies’ adaptation of the Terence Rattigan play "The Deep Blue Sea," the actress also shed a bit of light on working with a third Terrence – Malick – on his untitled love story with Ben Affleck. She describes the experience as “unlike any other I’ve ever had. Unorthodox would be a massive understatement. There isn’t really a script, you don’t know what the story is, you don’t know who the other characters are. I knew I was Ben Affleck’s sister and that he was in love with two different women but otherwise I didn’t know »

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Close up: Ken Russell 1927-2011

1 December 2011 10:10 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The acclaimed, eccentric director of Women in Love and The Devils died this week, prompting tributes from the press and former colleagues

The big story

Ken Russell died this week, leaving behind a body of work that shocked and surprised, teased and titillated. He was, said Xan Brooks in our early news story a man of "wild drama, gaudy conflagrations and operatic flourishes", a "juggler of high and low culture who invariably courted controversy".

Russell's career path - from his documentary work for the 1960s BBC series Monitor, to the short films he made at home in later years - was hard to map. His most infamous and innovative works - The Devils, Altered States - flashed by in the wake of semi-hits Women in Love (which won him an Oscar in 1971) and Tommy. He was, said friends an "iconoclast" (Venessa Redgrave). "Fearless, eccentric and silly" (Melvyn Bragg). "Capable of »

- Henry Barnes

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The Deep Blue Sea – review

24 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Rachel Weisz shines in a melancholy Rattigan adaptation, writes Peter Bradshaw

This misery can't last, says Celia Johnson in Brief Encounter … not even life lasts very long. There is much misery in Terence Davies's new movie, and much of the fear that Cs Lewis said was like grief, and also a kind of vertigo and euphoria at looking directly, as if for the first time, at the mystery of existence: the painful, intractable mystery romantic love will never quite be able to solve or explain away.

It's an impressionistic adaptation of Terence Rattigan's play about the young wife of a kindly, dull High Court judge. In 1950, she falls passionately in love with Freddie, a hard-drinking former Raf pilot whom she finds is more in love with his own heroic past. Rachel Weisz performs with enormous intelligence and restraint as Hester; Tom Hiddleston is the prickly airman, horrified by »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Close up: Leveson inquiry sees Hugh Grant tackle film publicity

24 November 2011 9:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hugh Grant, who was lauded for his appearance at the Leveson inquiry this week, had some arguments to air about the film promotion circuit

The big story

This week saw actor Hugh Grant deliver his testimony to the Leveson phone hacking inquiry. Grant, a vocal opponent of invasive press behaviour for many months, gave a thoughtful and measured performance. He no longer appeared "the foppish stereotype Brit," according to the Guardian's Michael White. "More high-minded Gary Cooper in Mr Deeds Goes to Town."

Part of Grant's argument centred on the impression that film stars ought to offer themselves up to promote their films. It was, he said, part of your responsibility to a project to do interviews around it ("If you didn't do a little bit of publicity you'd be a monster"), but far from essential. Grant estimated that around 5% of a film's success came down to whether or not he gave interviews, »

- Henry Barnes

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Terence Davies: follow your hormones

24 November 2011 3:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Terence Davies' new film features a bored 1950s wife who leaves her husband after some earth-moving illicit sex. It's how he wishes he'd lived his life, he says

'I'm gay, I live alone and I've been celibate for 30 years," says Terence Davies. "So in a sense, I can't imagine what it's like." The 65-year-old director is talking about women trapped in unfulfilling marriages in the 1950s. And yet, in another sense, he perfectly understands their plight – having witnessed, as a boy in the 1950s, his own mother's brutal marriage.

"My mum had a terrible life because my father was a complete psychopath," he says. "She never once complained. She got on with it. That's what you did. It moves me more than I can say." I can't help thinking of the unbearable scene in his autobiographical 1988 film Distant Voices, Still Lives in which the father bawls "Shut up! Shut up! »

- Stuart Jeffries

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Film Weekly podcast: Jason Solomons meets Terence Davies

24 November 2011 3:20 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This week on Film Weekly: Jason Solomons meets Terence Davies, who returns with an adaptation of Terence Rattigan's acclaimed play The Deep Blue Sea - his first non-documentary work in 11 years. He discusses his fascination with the postwar era and why he cast Rachel Weisz as a married woman who embarks on a passionate and tortured affair with a Raf veteran (played by Tom Hiddleston).

Jason also delves into the fraught world of west African politics when he meets Jarreth Merz the director of An African Election. The film follows the 2008 Ghanaian presidential elections with a forensic eye, unpacking the very particular tensions in Ghana's political culture.

Finally, Xan Brooks joins Jason to review some of this week's other releases, including Michelle Williams as the blond bombshell in My Week With Marilyn, Brad Pitt sporting a stack of statistics in baseball drama Moneyball and Boardwalk Empire star Michael Shannon »

- Jason Solomons, Xan Brooks, Jason Phipps

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New UK Trailer and Poster for The Deep Blue Sea Starring Rachel Weisz & Tom HIddleston

17 November 2011 6:00 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Artificial Eye have released a new poster and trailer for their movie, The Deep Blue Sea which played at the London Film Festival earlier in the year. Written and directed by Terence Davies​ (The House of Mirth​), The Deep Blue Sea stars Tom Hiddleston​, Rachel Weisz​, Simon Russell BealeHarry Hadden-PatonAnn Mitchell​ and Sarah Kants.

Hester Collyer (Academy Award winner Rachel Weisz) leads a privileged life in 1950s London as the beautiful wife of high court judge Sir William Collyer (Simon Russell Beale). To the shock of those around her, she walks out on her marriage to move in with young ex-raf pilot, Freddie Page (Tom Hiddleston), with whom she has fallen passionately in love.

Set in post-war Britain, this adaptation of Terence Rattigan’s classic play, The Deep Blue Sea is a study of forbidden love, suppressed desire, and the fear of loneliness – but is at heart a deeply moving love story. »

- David Sztypuljak

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Paul Dickson obituary

8 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Director who found success across film, TV and advertising

Paul Dickson, who has died aged 91, had a long, versatile and award-winning career in film, television and advertising. His critical reputation rests on two remarkable postwar documentaries, The Undefeated (1950) and David (1951, the Welsh contribution to the Festival of Britain). Episodes of The Avengers (1968) and Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) in 1969 were among his best-known television credits.

Dickson first attracted notice with The Undefeated, a film about the difficulties faced by injured wartime combatants who were patients at rehabilitation centres in Roehampton, Stoke Mandeville and elsewhere, as they adjusted to life in the postwar world. A calculated but moving attempt to destigmatise state help for disabled people, the film quickly became a critical success after opening at the Edinburgh film festival. A recruitment drive for the Korean war appeared to curtail its wider circulation, but it was awarded best documentary by the British »

- Scott Anthony

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Paul Dickson obituary

8 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Director who found success across film, TV and advertising

Paul Dickson, who has died aged 91, had a long, versatile and award-winning career in film, television and advertising. His critical reputation rests on two remarkable postwar documentaries, The Undefeated (1950) and David (1951, the Welsh contribution to the Festival of Britain). Episodes of The Avengers (1968) and Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) in 1969 were among his best-known television credits.

Dickson first attracted notice with The Undefeated, a film about the difficulties faced by injured wartime combatants who were patients at rehabilitation centres in Roehampton, Stoke Mandeville and elsewhere, as they adjusted to life in the postwar world. A calculated but moving attempt to destigmatise state help for disabled people, the film quickly became a critical success after opening at the Edinburgh film festival. A recruitment drive for the Korean war appeared to curtail its wider circulation, but it was awarded best documentary by the British »

- Scott Anthony

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Listen Now: A GeekCast Radio Network Update

1 November 2011 2:06 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Welcome back to our weekly look at the new podcasts available at our “partners in podcast crime” the GeekCast Radio Network. As usual here’s our weekly look at the podcasts from Gcrn, This Week in Geek and the latest toy review videos from Baltmatrix, with descriptions and links to each and every podcast.

Interviews – TVShowsOnDVD’s – Gord Lacey & David Lambert

November 1, 2011 marks the 10 year anniversary of www.tvshowsondvd.com being online. TFG1Mike sits down with Gord Lacey and Dave Lambert to talk about the journey this amazing site has been on. We talk about how Gord started the site, how Gord and Dave met up, and lots of other TVShowsOnDVD Goodness! Listen Now

Gcr – Episode 30: Music Spotlight – 60?s & 70?s

In the 30th episode we here at GeekCast Radio are starting the music spotlight. Join TFG1Mike, Dave Double D Denis, and Chuckdawg1999 as they talk about the »

- Phil

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British Independent Film Awards Nominations

31 October 2011 7:23 AM, PDT | LOVEFiLM | See recent LOVEFiLM news »

The nominations for this year’s British Independent Film Awards, due to take place on December 4 in London, were announced this afternoon at St Martin's Lane Hotel.

Shame, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Tyrannosaur currently lead the awards with an impressive 7 nominations each.

Following closely behind are We Need To Talk About Kevin and Kill List that received 6 nominations respectively while Submarine gained 5.

The leading men contending for Best Actor include Gary Oldman (Tinker Tailor), Michael Fassbender (Shame) and Brendan Gleeson (The Guard).

In the running for Best Actress is Rebecca Hall (The Awakening), Mia Wasikowska (Jane Eyre), MyAnna Buring (Kill List), Olivia Colman (Tyrannosaur) and Tilda Swinton (We Need To Talk About Kevin).

The Jury for this year’s awards is composed of actor David Thewlis, producer Charles Steel (The Last King of Scotland) and director Josh Appignanesi (The Infidel).

Films that missed out on nods include London Film Festival closing film, »

- zayyaf.saleem@lovefilm.com (Zayyaf Saleem)

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55th BFI London Film Festival - The Deep Blue Sea (2011)

29 October 2011 3:05 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Deep Blue Sea, 2011.

Written and Directed by Terence Davies.

Starring Rachel Weisz, Tom Hiddleston, Simon Russell Beale, Karl Johnson, Ann Mitchell, Harry Hadden-Paton, Sarah Kants and Jolyon Coy.

Synopsis:

The wife of a British Judge leaves her husband to embark on a self-destructive love affair with an Raf pilot.

It is quite fitting that the closing film of of this year’s festival is directed by one of the hidden gems of British cinema, Terence Davies. Adapted from Terrence Rattigan’s play, Davies’ The Deep Blue Sea features what could potentially be the most emotionally raw performances of Rachel Weisz’s career.

Set in London in the 1950’s, we see Hester (Weisz) becoming bored of her dull marriage to judge William Collyer (Simon Russell Beale) and her even duller mother-in-law (the very funny Ann Mitchell). When brash, self centred Freddie (Tom Hiddleston), an Raf pilot, offers her something new »

- flickeringmyth

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London: "The Deep Blue Sea"

28 October 2011 8:46 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

David here with one last report from the London Film Festival. Master British filmmaker Terence Davies provided a suitably British closing film, with Rachel Weisz lost in The Deep Blue Sea...

"Caught between the devil and the deep blue sea," Hester Collyer (Rachel Weisz) remarks at one point, naming the title of Terence Davies' latest feature, an adaptation of a Terence Rattigan play. It's Hester's voice that opens the film, too, disembodied over the dark blue background of the credits, reading a suicide note to her lover, Freddie Page (Tom Hiddleston of Thor fame). Hester is drowning in the deep blue sea of her own adoration, because Freddie's love isn't strong enough to reciprocate and pull her back to the surface.

The Deep Blue Sea betrays its theatrical origins from the first shot, panning smoothly across the front of a row of houses, the edges of the frame misty »

- Dave

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This week's new films

28 October 2011 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Adventures Of Tintin: The Secret Of The Unicorn (PG)

(Steven Spielberg, 2011, Us/Nz) Jamie Bell, Andy Serkis, Daniel Craig, Simon Pegg, Nick Frost. 107 mins.

If you forget Hergé's sacred source material and forgive the occasional creepiness of the animation, there's good fun to be had here. Guided by Spielberg's visual command, it's a boys' adventure with an Indiana Jones/Pirates Of The Caribbean rambunctiousness to it – a fast mix of dazzling action and comedy alcoholism that builds up so much momentum, it barely knows when to stop.

The Help (12A)

(Tate Taylor, 2011, Us) Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Bryce Dallas Howard. 146 mins.

The feelgood hit of the Us summer puts a cheery gloss on the civil rights era, as a Mississippi woman scandalously documents the woes of black maids.

The Ides Of March (15)

(George Clooney, 2011, Us) Ryan Gosling, George Clooney, Evan Rachel Wood. 101 mins.

Clooney follows the campaign trail »

- Steve Rose

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BFI London Film Festival 2011: Preview

11 October 2011 3:38 PM, PDT | The Moving Arts Journal | See recent The Moving Arts Journal news »

 

 

The 55th edition of the London Film Festival (Lff) starts tomorrow, October 12th, and runs until the 22nd. This year the festival will screen 204 features and 110 shorts from 55 different countries. A selection of films will compete for the festival’s 4 main prizes: the Best Film Award, The Grierson Award for Best Documentary, Best British Newcomer and The Sutherland Award (for most imaginative and original first feature). In addition, the British Film Institute will present its highest honour, BFI Fellowships, to actor Ralph Fiennes and director David Cronenberg, the first Canadian ever to receive the fellowship.

 

The festival comprises nine different sections, from big budget films by well-known directors, to first features, encompassing innovative new films from all over the world. There is a section devoted to European cinema, and special sections for British and French cinema. There are also separate sections devoted to shorts, experimental films, and classic films that have recently been restored. »

- Alison Frank

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Trailer trash

8 October 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Downton Abbey graduate Jessica Brown Findlay reveals the debt she owes to Maggie Smith, and do we really need so many films released?

Lady Sybil heads south

Jessica Brown Findlay can't believe she's about to make her movie debut in Albatross. "I had no idea what would happen when I got a little part in Downton Abbey," she told me. "Now I'm acting with Maggie Smith and the show's winning Emmys and I'm on posters." The husky-voiced star, 22, plays a wild child in the film, and is Lady Sybil Crawley in Downton.

"Maggie Smith is just inspirational – she told me to always give them a version of the line how you really feel it should be delivered, then do it their way: invariably, they'll end up using your way because it'll be the one with the most conviction." Using this advice she has now flown off for two weeks in »

- Jason Solomons

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Cronenberg and Fiennes to be honoured at LFF

5 October 2011 5:46 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

David Cronenberg, the 1980s body horror auteur turned arthouse elder statesman, and the British actor turned director Ralph Fiennes are to be honoured by the BFI at this year's London film festival.

Both men will receive fellowships from the institute. Cronenberg's film A Dangerous Method is screening at the festival this year, as is Fiennes' directing debut, Coriolanus. The BFI also announced the nine-strong lineup of films which will compete for this year's best film prize, to be announced at an awards ceremony on 26 October.

Fiennes is perhaps best known for his Oscar-nominated turns in Schindler's List and The English Patient. He has become Hollywood's go-to guy for offbeat villainous roles, starring as the serial killer Francis Dolarhyde in 2002 Silence of the Lambs prequel Red Dragon and Lord Voldemort in the Harry Potter films. Other roles include crusading widower Justin Quayle »

- Ben Child

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2011 | 2010 | 2008

1-20 of 88 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


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