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As Long as They're Happy (1955)

A stockbroker's youngest daughter tricks an American singer into visiting her family at their suburban Wimbledon home. Her two sisters and their oddball husbands also visit and the ... See full summary »

Director:

(as J. Lee-Thompson)

Writers:

, (play)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Jeannie Carson ...
Pat Bentley (as Jean Carson)
Brenda de Banzie ...
Stella Bentley
...
Corinne Bentley
Jerry Wayne ...
Bobby Denver
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...
Barnaby Brady
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Dr. Hermann Schneider
...
Mrs. Arbuthnot
...
Linda
...
Peter Pember
...
May
Gilbert Harding ...
Himself
...
Barmaid
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Storyline

A stockbroker's youngest daughter tricks an American singer into visiting her family at their suburban Wimbledon home. Her two sisters and their oddball husbands also visit and the stockbroker notes the effect of the singer on his lovelorn family. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Musical

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 April 1955 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Amor com Cebolas  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character of Bobby Denver, played by Jerry Wayne, is based on singer Johnnie Ray. See more »

Goofs

At one point Bobby Denver refers to "braces". As an American he would use the term "suspenders". See more »

Quotes

Gwen Bentley: It's not infatuation. I'm in love with him.
John Bentley: Don't be ridiculous. He's nearly as old as I am. You're only sixteen.
Gwen Bentley: Juliet was only fourteen when she fell in love with Romeo.
John Bentley: They were foreigners!
See more »

Connections

Version of As Long as They're Happy (1953) See more »

Soundtracks

I Don't Know Whether To Laugh Or Cry
Written by Sam Coslow
Performed by Jerry Wayne
Reprised by Jack Buchanan
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User Reviews

 
Bye Bye British Birdie
15 November 2006 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

Really, almost a warmup to the Strouse-Adams stage musical of five years later, in that it's about a teen-idol singer (a crooner here, rock and roll being just on the horizon) who invades an upper-middle-class suburban home, antagonizes the paterfamilias, enthralls his impressionable teenage daughter, and generally charms the women of the neighborhood. As the dad, Jack Buchanan mainly purses his lips and inserts nasal insults into the proceedings; he's nowhere near as broad as Paul Lynde, nor as funny. (But then, his lines are unusually feeble.) And he only gets one brief dance, near the end, and a smattering of vocals. David Hurst, as a cartoonish German shrink studying the effects of a teen heartthrob on the bourgeoisie, is just unforgivably bad. It's not all his fault: J. Lee Thompson, as he did years later with "What a Way to Go!", overemphasizes everything and hammers the comedy into the ground. Jerry Wayne, as the Conrad Birdie of the piece, sings some Johnnie Ray-type ballads with the right sobbing style. And Jeannie Carson, as another of Buchanan's girls, is the best thing in the picture, pretty and spirited and talented, even in an overproduced musical sequence that hasn't much to do with anything. There's also Diana Dors, the camera lingering lovingly on her cleavage, as a good-time party girl. None of it makes sense, the subplots are unrelated to each other, and there's no payoff, but as a chronicle of how the British tried to adopt American pop-culture customs even as they were satirizing them, it's kind of fascinating.


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