Actor Jack Webb, inexplicably working for a police department, arrives at a U.S. Air Force base looking to get a feel for Air Force "language." The base commander is embroiled in a ... See full summary »

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Himself - Jack Webb
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Col. Jim Breech (as Art Ballinger)
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Mayor Hogan
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Boggs - City Councilman
James Hayes
Mel Pogue
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Paul Frees ...
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Storyline

Actor Jack Webb, inexplicably working for a police department, arrives at a U.S. Air Force base looking to get a feel for Air Force "language." The base commander is embroiled in a contretemps with the citizens of a nearby town who object to the noise of the base's jets. But when the Air Force helps the mayor out of a jam, all is forgiven. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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Short | History

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22 December 1955 (USA)  »

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If We Didn't Get 'Em...They Didn't Come!
21 January 2012 | by (las vegas, nv) – See all my reviews

Oscar-nominated short film, a Walt Disney co-production distributed by Warner Bros., honoring the military forces that keep us safe from enemy harm--at the expense of families living in homes located around the noisy air bases. Jack Webb tours one such location (in sunny Millville, possibly standing in for Southern California's March Air Force Base), filled with Tigers--"a nice bunch of kids"--which has come under fire for its particular flight patterns. Narrating in his halting, somber style, Webb (courtesy screenwriters Beirne Lay Jr. and Richard L. Breen) makes melodramatic observations about the aircraft, the pilots, and the controllers as if the country were on the verge of World War III (one presumes to belittle the complaints of mothers down below who can't get their babies to sleep because of the passing jets). Not particularly well-executed, the 30-minute film is both awkward and naïve, a showcase for the military advancement in decimating entire towns. *1/2 from ****


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