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Alfred Hitchcock Presents (TV Series 1955–1962) Poster

Trivia

The sponsors, who had great influence regarding the presentation of the show, insisted that for the episodes ending with the perpetrator "getting away with a crime", Sir Alfred Hitchcock provide a statement in his closing monologue that would assure audiences that justice was served.
Sir Alfred Hitchcock drew the silhouette of himself featured in the opening credits. He began his film career as an illustrator of title cards for silent movies.
Most people who have seen this series, remember Sir Alfred Hitchcock's opening and closing narratives for the series. However, for each episode, more than one opening and closing was filmed, as Hitchcock's famous jibes at the sponsors were unappreciated in the European markets. So for each episode, Hitchcock filmed two openings and two closings: one would be for American viewings (jokes about sponsors) and the second would be for European showings (jokes about Americans, and not about sponsors). For most of the third season, Hitchcock even did the opening and closings in French and German, as he spoke both languages fluently.
Sir Alfred Hitchcock directed seventeen episodes.
The opening and closing music is "Funeral March for a Marionette" by Charles Gounod.
Walt Disney refused to allow Sir Alfred Hitchcock to film at Disneyland in the early 1960s, because Hitchcock had made "that disgusting movie Psycho (1960)." Hitchcock's intended project is unidentified at this time, but it may have been for an episode of his television series.
In the last three seasons, the show's running time was extended to sixty minutes, and renamed The Alfred Hitchcock Hour (1962).
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On August 11, 2009 the U.S. Postal Service issued a pane of twenty 44-cent commemorative postage stamps honoring early U.S. television programs. A booklet with twenty picture postcards was also issued. The stamp honoring "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" pictured host Sir Alfred Hitchcock. Other shows honored in the Early TV Memories issue were: The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet (1952), The Dinah Shore Show (1951), Dragnet (1951), "The Ed Sullivan Show" (originally titled The Ed Sullivan Show (1948)), The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show (1950), Hopalong Cassidy (1952), The Honeymooners (1955), "The Howdy Doody Show" (original title: The Howdy Doody Show (1947)), I Love Lucy (1951), Kukla, Fran and Ollie (1947), Lassie (1954), The Lone Ranger (1949), Perry Mason (1957), The Phil Silvers Show (1955), The Red Skelton Hour (1951), "Texaco Star Theater" (titled Texaco Star Theatre (1948), 1954-1956), The Tonight Show (which began as Tonight! (1953)), The Twilight Zone (1959), and You Bet Your Life (1950).
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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