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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

10 items from 2016


Drive-In Dust Offs: The Psychopath (1966)

23 July 2016 9:47 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

With the advent and huge success of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960), studios were quick to hop aboard the killer train. Out were the outsized monsters of the ’50s, in were mama’s boys and socially maligned women dealing with sins of the past. Dementia 13 (’63) and No Way to Treat a Lady (’67) are just a sample of the ’60s horror films that focused on smaller scale, human dilemmas, regardless of how twisted they may be. One film that seems to have been misplaced in the schizoid shuffle is Freddie FrancisThe Psychopath (1966), a lean little thriller that acts as a gateway for one of the most revered European horror sub-genres: the giallo.

Of course, Psycho plays a major part in this association; the Italian-originated giallo wallowing in mysteries of the mind shot through with a razor-sharp emphasis on the visceral, stemming from a psychological need, a desire, to fix wrongs, »

- Scott Drebit

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Review: "Nightmares" (1983) Starring Cristina Raines, Lance Henrikson And Emilio Estevez; Blu-ray Special Edition

10 July 2016 3:07 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

By the early 1970s there had been a revival of interest in the format of anthology suspense/horror stories. This genre had been all the rage in the late 1950s and early 1960s with shows like "The Twilight Zone", "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" and "Thriller!" (hosted by Boris Karloff) attracting loyal audiences. "Twilight Zone" creator and host Rod Serling had two bites at the apple when he introduced "Night Gallery" as a TV movie in 1969 (giving young Steven Spielberg his first major directing gig) and then spun it off into a moderately successful weekly TV series. The early to mid-1970s also saw a major resurgence in horror-themed anthology feature films. The concept was hardly a new one for the big screen as the first major film of this type was "Dead of Night", released in 1945.  Roger Corman oversaw some similarly-themed big screen anthologies in the early to mid-1960s, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Terror on TV: ‘Final Escape’ From the 80s Incarnation of Alfred Hitchcock Presents

25 May 2016 7:50 AM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

For whatever reason the 80s revamp of vintage television suspense anthology series Alfred Hitchcock Presents gets minimal mention in genre worship circles. Perhaps that’s due to its very existence, chained as it was and will be forever to the memory of its source. Perhaps it’s the fact that the series was syndicated to death during…

The post Terror on TV: ‘Final Escape’ From the 80s Incarnation of Alfred Hitchcock Presents appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Chris Alexander

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A New Lore: Are Podcasts TV’s Next Goldmine?

24 April 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tony Black on whether podcasts are TV’s next goldmine…

The fascinating announcement this week that Gale Ann Hurd, longtime producing partner of James Cameron and most recently one of the spearheading forces of the massively successful The Walking Dead franchise, is intending to produce a live-action anthology series out of Lore, one of the most successful podcasts on the web, could be a game changer. I listen to Lore, as do two million other people when Aaron Mahnke releases fortnightly his twenty minute or so explorations into the myth and legend of Americana and the paranormal. Yet this, to my knowledge, is the first example of a direct translation of a free-to-air, semi-professional piece of non-fiction audio into a potential dramatic TV series. It could be a revolutionary move that, if successful, sees the TV and maybe even the movie industry tap into an entirely new goldmine of creative possibility: the podcast. »

- Tony Black

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Don’T Bother To Knock (1952)

11 April 2016 9:20 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The icon-establishing performances Marilyn Monroe gave in Howard HawksGentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and in Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959) are ones for the ages, touchstone works that endure because of the undeniable comic energy and desperation that sparked them from within even as the ravenous public became ever more enraptured by the surface of Monroe’s seductive image of beauty and glamour. Several generations now probably know her only from these films, or perhaps 1955’s The Seven-Year Itch, a more famous probably for the skirt-swirling pose it generated than anything in the movie itself, one of director Wilder’s sourest pictures, or her final completed film, The Misfits (1961), directed by John Huston, written by Arthur Miller and costarring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.

But in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952) she delivers a powerful dramatic performance as Nell, a psychologically devastated, delusional, perhaps psychotic young woman apparently on »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Barbara Turner, ‘Georgia’ Screenwriter and Mother of Jennifer Jason Leigh, Dies

5 April 2016 3:38 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Barbara Turner, the screenwriter of “Petulia,” “Georgia” and “Pollock,” among numerous other features for film and television, died on Tuesday, April 5, in Los Angeles. Among Turner’s children was actress Jennifer Jason Leigh. She was thought to be her in mid to late-70s.

After high school, Turner attended the University of Texas for a year, then returned to New York to study acting first at the Dramatic Workshop and later with Paul Mann, where she met Vic Morrow, who became her first  husband. In the late ’50s, Turner and Morrow moved to Hollywood, where she began acting in theater and on television series such as “Playhouse 90” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents.” Turner’s first screenplay was an adaptation of the Jean Genet play “Deathwatch,” directed by Morrow in 1966.

Turner received a Writers’ Guild of America nomination for her adaptation of “Petulia” (directed by Richard Lester in 1968), an Emmy nomination »

- Carmel Dagan

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Barbara Turner, ‘Georgia’ Screenwriter and Mother of Jennifer Jason Leigh, Dies at 79

5 April 2016 3:38 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Barbara Turner, the screenwriter of “Petulia,” “Georgia” and “Pollock,” among numerous other features for film and television, died on Tuesday, April 5, in Los Angeles. Among Turner’s children was actress Jennifer Jason Leigh. She was 79.

After high school, Turner attended the University of Texas for a year, then returned to New York to study acting first at the Dramatic Workshop and later with Paul Mann, where she met Vic Morrow, who became her first  husband. In the late ’50s, Turner and Morrow moved to Hollywood, where she began acting in theater and on television series such as “Playhouse 90” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents.” Turner’s first screenplay was an adaptation of the Jean Genet play “Deathwatch,” directed by Morrow in 1966.

Turner received a Writers’ Guild of America nomination for her adaptation of “Petulia” (directed by Richard Lester in 1968), an Emmy nomination for TV movie “The War Between the Tates” (1977), Emmy »

- Carmel Dagan

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Robert Horton, ‘Wagon Train’ Actor, Dies at 91

15 March 2016 12:43 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Robert Horton, known for his role as scout Flint McCullough in the Emmy-nominated series “Wagon Train,” died March 9 in Los Angeles, his niece Joan Evans told the New York Times. He was 91.

He landed his breakout role starring as McCullough in the hit Western series “Wagon Train” for five seasons, exiting the show in 1962. Around the time he left “Wagon Train”– which accumulated seven Primetime Emmy nominations throughout the duration of its eight-season run — the show switched networks, transitioning from NBC to ABC.

Soon after departing from “Wagon Train,” Horton starred in the one-season Western series “A Man Called Shenandoah,” for which he also sang the theme song. Other key TV roles include guest spots on “Murder, She Wrote,” “As the World Turns,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Public Defender” and “The Lone Ranger.”

Horton also performed on Broadway and pursued a singing career. In 1963 he starred as rainmaker Bill Starbuck in »

- Alyssa Sage

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King Kong on The Radio—Who Knew?

25 February 2016 6:00 PM, PST | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

I am amazed at the discoveries that continue to be made in the worlds of film and popular culture. The latest issue of the Vitaphone Newsletter cites an astonishing number of silent and sound films that have only recently surfaced. But my favorite "find" is more of a tease, because it doesn't really exist. Until recently no one was even aware of it: a 15-part radio serialization of King Kong from 1933. The man who made the discovery is the prolific pop culture chronicler Martin Grams, Jr., whose many books include The 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents' Companion, The Shadow: The History and Mystery of the Radio Program 1930-1954, and The Radio Adventures of Sam Spade, to name just a...

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- Leonard Maltin

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Pat Harrington Jr., 'One Day at a Time' Actor, Dead at 86

7 January 2016 10:38 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Pat Harrington Jr., best known for playing scene-stealing superintendent Dwayne Schneider on CBS sitcom One Day at a Time, has died at age 86. The actor had been battling Alzheimer's and was recently hospitalized following a fall, The Hollywood Reporter reports, and passed away Wednesday night in Los Angeles. 

"Dear friends, it is with the most unimaginable pain and sadness, that I tell you my father, Pat Harrington, Jr. passed away at 11:09 Pm this evening," his daughter Tresa Harrington wrote Wednesday in a Facebook post. "We were all with him today and tonight: crying, »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

10 items from 2016


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