The Wild One
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13 items from 2013


‘The Good German’ is Soderbergh’s paean to old war films

11 November 2013 9:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Good German

Written by Paul Attanasio

Directed by Steven Soderbergh

USA, 2006

During the mid-2000s, between his exercise in low-budget filmmaking and new modes of exhibition with Bubble, and his big-budget ensemble Ocean’s Thirteen, Steven Soderbergh made a mid-budget return to 1940s style with The Good German.

Announcing the unambiguous Casablanca reference with a mimicking poster, Soderbergh’s black-and-white film is full of classic Hollywood soft-lighting and sinister wartime figures.

The Good German fits squarely alongside two previous Soderbergh efforts in its near-revisionist status: Underneath and Solaris, which are both bold takes on classic source material. Underneath reworks Robert Siodmak’s Criss Cross into a color-gelled suburban world.  Solaris is a re-adaptation of Stanislaw Lem’s 1961 novel, moving the film closer to a relationship drama than Andrei Tarkovsky’s famous 1972 adaptation was.

These two films point toward Soderbergh’s willingness to take on and reimagine classic tropes.  Though »

- Neal Dhand

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Top 10 teen movies

2 November 2013 3:21 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

When you grow up, your heart dies – or so they say. Here's the proof: from Heathers to Juno, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best teen movies

• Top 10 action movies

• Top 10 crime movies

• Top 10 arthouse movies

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Blackboard Jungle

Billed as "a brass-knuckle punch in its startling revelation of teenage savages" and based on the book of the same name by Evan Hunter – aka crime writer Ed McBain – who drew on his own experiences as a teacher in the Bronx – Blackboard Jungle ushered in the age of the teenage delinquent. In London, Brooks's film attracted crowds of Teddy Boys, who slashed cinema seats, danced in the aisles and actually started a riot.

The reason for such shocking behaviour wasn't so much the film's content, which today garners a more sober 12 rating, but because of the use of »

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Film Review: ‘Why We Ride’

31 October 2013 5:53 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Treating motorcycle enthusiasts and the objects of their obsession with the utmost reverence, the lovingly crafted documentary “Why We Ride” ultimately chokes on the fumes of bombastic self-seriousness. Director Bryan H. Carroll’s feature-length love letter is far too earnest to connect with the broader audience it’s clearly seeking in limited theatrical play. Smoother roads lie ahead via imminent home video release, where the pic can serve as a fitting holiday gift for those who find riding a Harley akin to having a religious experience.

Carroll takes his cues from the old “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” ad campaign as a sort of pop-culture corrective to the badass bikers portrayed in everything from “The Wild One” (briefly excerpted here) to “Sons of Anarchy,” and loads up on talking heads to demonstrate all-American variety within the ranks. Unfortunately, the wide age range and reasonable gender balance among »

- Geoff Berkshire

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Watch: Marlon Brando's Screen Test For 'Rebel Without A Cause'

17 July 2013 9:36 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Marlon Brando and James Dean are a pop-culture duo, the twin faces of leather-jacketed '50s rebellion. Never mind that their career paths were about as different as could possibly be, with Dean's cut off before he reached his prime and Brando's extending long, long beyond his: their performances in “The Wild One” (Brando) and “Rebel Without A Cause” (Dean) are icons of the scary new ball of longing and fury that the world was just beginning to call “the teenager.” But imagine if things had gone differently, that somewhere, in an alternate universe not so very different from our own, it was Brando who had the lead in “Rebel Without A Cause,” smouldering all over the screen. He came close enough to screen test for the role, which you can take a look at below.Well, almost. In truth, this is a screen test from eight years before Nicholas Ray »

- Ben Brock

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James Gandolfini: He did for television what Marlon Brando did for the movies

22 June 2013 8:49 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Gangster movies, I mean the classic ones from the Hollywood studio-system days, now seem (at least to me) rather quaint, the same way that old Westerns do. Guys in fedoras with Tommy guns, snarling threats at the “coppers.” Back in their time, though, movies like Scarface and Little Caesar and White Heat had more than a touch of scandal about them. They were highly controversial, attacked by censors because they were considered dangerous. And the reason they were considered dangerous was basic and primal: They showed really bad guys doing really bad things (stealing, beating up rivals, smacking women around, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Better than Fast and Furious: ‘Dirty Mary Crazy Larry’ takes a rightful place in the pantheon of great racing movies

24 May 2013 8:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Dirty Mary Crazy Larry

Directed by John Hough

Written by Leigh Chapman and Antonio Santean

1974, USA

A good percentage of the best American chase films were released in the decade that brought us a new wave of rebellious, edgy filmmakers who put muscle cars in the spotlight, and directed realistic, fast-paced action sequences highlighted by the incredible stunt work from Hollywood daredevils. Cutting right to the chase, Dirty Mary Crazy Larry is high on extreme stunts and crazy car crashes, created in a time when CGI didn’t exist. Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry remains one of the best in the genre: the stunts are extreme, the humor is dark, and the cars are awesome.

Released in 1974, Dirty Mary Crazy Larry is a ridiculous fun, heist picture driven by tough-guy dialogue, male posturing and a somewhat familiar premise. Adapted from Richard Unekis novel The Chase, the film follows a stock car »

- Ricky da Conceição

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Queens of the Stone Age Release A 15 Minute Video Set To New Songs

21 May 2013 10:15 AM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

There’s an easy cool to Josh Homme and the music he writes with his band Queens of the Stone Age.  Like Marlon Brando in The Wild One when asked “what are you rebelling against” -  “Whadda you got?” – the music of Qotsa just drips with sweat, gasoline, attitude, and … well… coolness.  Their new album …Like Clockwork will be released on June 4, but don’t let the title fool you.  Apparently the new album didn’t go as planned and wasn’t such an easy journey.  Then again, I don’t think Brando knew what he was getting himself into when he stopped into that small town bar in The Wild One.  For what it’s worth, the new album is now completed and features a number of guest stars including Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner, Dave Grohl, Elton John, Nine Inch NailsTrent Reznor, and Jake Shears of Scissor Sisters. »

- Michael Haffner

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The Place Beyond The Pines review

28 March 2013 2:46 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Review Ryan Lambie 29 Mar 2013 - 08:46

A crime drama starring Ryan Gosling, The Place Beyond The Pines is a bleak yet rewarding character study, Ryan writes...

Ryan Gosling strides into The Place Beyond The Pines like a mythical being straight out of 50s Hollywood: with the melancholic cool of James Dean, he rides his rasping motorcycle in a ball of death for a travelling carnival, while Eva Mendes swoons over his pumped-up physique and patchwork of tattoos. But director Derek Cianfrance (Blue Valentine) does more than riff on Gosling's post-Drive ascension to heart-throb status; instead, his film gets under the skin of cinema's romantic view of the rugged outlaw archetype, revealing a more depressing underlying truth about wealth and status.

In an attempt to provide for his ex-lover Romina (Mendes) and their infant son, motorcycle rider Luke (Gosling) quits his carnival act and embarks on a bank robbing spree across Schenectady, »

- ryanlambie

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The Wild One Retrospective Review

12 March 2013 9:20 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

“Everything these days is pictures.” Jim says to the motorcycle gang in The Wild One, “Pictures and a lot of noise. Nobody even knows how to talk, just grunt at each other.” If this was being noticed even then, we’re in real trouble. Obviously I like pictures, but the last part is becoming more and more insidious and apparent, where texting is preferred over a phone call.

The Wild One stars Marlon Brando as Johnny Strabler, the leader of a motorcycle gang that passes through small towns causing trouble. He’s a rebel without a cause, looking for trouble but finding love in Kathy, played by Mary Murphy. This film is iconic for Brando’s portrayal of a seemingly lost, masculine biker that sports a tilted cap, shades, tight jeans and a stunning leather jacket that breathes male sexuality and appeal. On a regular day like any other, »

- Quinn Steers

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Dale Robertson obituary

1 March 2013 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Dale Robertson obituary

28 February 2013 8:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Mindy Newell: Four-Color Valentines

11 February 2013 5:00 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

DC released Young Romance this week, using the title of one of the overlooked and (imho) underappreciated gems of comics history, the seminal romance comic that was created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby and was published from 1947 to 1975. I’m old enough to remember many of the stories contained within those pages; they were attuned to the morals of the times, and regularly told tales of unrequited love, of compromised love, and of love triumphant.

The characters were easily identifiable: there was the bad girl, the bad boy, the good girl, and the good boy.

The bad girl (think Betty Rizzo in Grease) smoke and/or drank, wore too much makeup and perfume, wore incredibly slinky dress that didn’t leave much to the imagination, preyed on other women’s men, and was quite free with her, uh, favors. Not that anything was ever shown except for kisses, but »

- Mindy Newell

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Michael Winner obituary

21 January 2013 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Flamboyant film director, best known for Death Wish, and later an outspoken restaurant critic and bon vivant

Michael Winner, who has died aged 77, supplied interviewers with a list of more than 30 films he had directed, not always including the early travelogue This Is Belgium (1956), mostly shot in East Grinstead. But his enduring work was himself – a bravura creation of movies, television, journalism, the law courts and a catchphrase, ''Calm down, dear", from an exasperating series of television commercials.

He was born in London, the only child of George and Helen Winner, who were of Russian and Polish extraction respectively. His builder father made enough money propping up blitzed houses to invest in London property. The profits funded his wife's gambling, which, her son complained, so distracted "Mumsie" that he was never paid due attention. She left him in the bedroom with the mink coats of guests who came to his »

- Veronica Horwell

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

13 items from 2013


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