White Christmas
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FAQ Contents


A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for White Christmas can be found here.

Two World War II Army buddies, Bob Wallace (Bing Crosby) and Phil Davis (Danny Kaye), form a successful song-and-dance act and follow two sisters, Betty (Rosemary Clooney) and Judy (Vera-Ellen) Haynes to a Vermont ski-lodge where the Haynes sisters are scheduled to perform a Christmas show. When they get there, however, they find that it hasn't snowed since Thanksgiving and that the lodge, which is owned by Bob and Phil's old Army general, Thomas Waverly (Dean Jagger), is on the verge of failing. To help out, Bob and Phil come up with a plan to help.

No. White Christmas is based on a screenplay written by American film-makers Norman Krasna, Norman Panama, and Melvin Frank. It features music composed by American composer and lyricist, Irving Berlin [1888-1989], considered to be one of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century.

Rosemary Clooney was 26, and her 'younger' sister (Vera-Ellen) was 33. Danny Kaye was 41. Bing Crosby and Dean Jagger ('the old man') were both 51.

How does the movie end?

It's finally Christmas eve. Bob and Phil's show, 'Playing Around', is about to open, and the lodge is packed, thanks to Bob's appeal on the Ed Harrison show. As Bob gives directions to the guys from the 151st Division who showed up to honor the General, Betty arrives from New York. Tom is forced to put on his old military uniform because Emma (Mary Wickes) 'thoughtlessly' sent all of his other suits to the cleaners. When Tom enters the showroom, the audience gives him a standing ovation, and the 151st Division marches onto the stage singing 'The Old Man.' After the General inspects his troops, Bob and Phil sing and dance to 'Gee, I Wish I was Back in the Army', joined onstage by Betty and Judy. As the show ends, snow starts to fall. Bob and Phil, now dressed as Santas, along with Betty and Judy, perform the final number 'White Christmas'. Bob notices a present addressed to him from Betty has been added to his sack of toys. He opens it to find a statue of a knight in shining armor seated on a white horse. In the final scene, Bob kisses Betty, Phil kisses Judy, and the audience joins them in signing 'White Christmas'.

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