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Tobor the Great (1954)

Approved | | Sci-Fi | 1 September 1954 (USA)
A young boy-genius befriends his grandfather's robot, designed as a test pilot for space travel and coveted by foreign spies.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (story)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Dr. Ralph Harrison
...
Janice Roberts
...
Brian 'Gadge' Roberts
...
Prof. Arnold Nordstrom
...
The Foreign Spy-Chief
Henry Kulky ...
Paul - Spy-Henchman
Franz Roehn ...
Karl
Hal Baylor ...
Max - Spy-Henchman
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Storyline

As projected here, a thinly-disguised NASA, working with nuclear rockets, is ready for manned flights in the mid-fifties...but Dr. Ralph Harrison doesn't think so, and resigns in protest. Colleague Prof. Nordstrom promptly enlists his aid in developing an alternative robot Spaceman! Naturally, foreign spies are keenly interested... Uses documentary footage of early space research. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Man-Made monster with every human emotion

Genres:

Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 September 1954 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Vingança do Monstro  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

When Tobor escapes from Professor Nordstrom's compound and knocks down the high voltage gate, it sparks as he walks across it. But at this point the gate isn't connected to anything. See more »

Quotes

Brian 'Gadge' Robertson: Gee, Tobor, you're wonderful!
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Connections

Featured in Troldspejlet: Episode #40.2 (2008) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Science Depends Too Much on ESP
10 July 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

There is early space-race fear of putting human beings in orbit. Of course, pioneering astronauts had no sure things since so much was based on speculation. A man named Nordstrom develops a robot (Tobor, get it?) that could do the same things as a human without the danger to our delicate constitutions. Of course, the Russians get wind of his invention and easily move in on everyone. Since this is basically a kid movie, there is a precocious kid who can't keep his hands off anything. He could have undone millions of dollars in research with his intrusions, but, of course, boy will be boys. To me this is entertaining but it's hard to overcome the dependence on ESP as a conduit to the robot. Throw out all the technology and simply think things. Isn't that the way Professor Harold Hill taught his bands to play their instruments in "The Music Man"?


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