IMDb > La Strada (1954)
La strada
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La Strada (1954) More at IMDbPro »La strada (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.2/10   35,468 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Federico Fellini (story) &
Tullio Pinelli (story) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for La Strada on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
16 July 1956 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
You've been hearing about a great picture called La Strada (The Road)...now it is here!
Plot:
A care-free girl is sold to a traveling entertainer, consequently enduring physical and emotional pain along the way. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 10 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
A Potpourri of Vestiges Review: Fellini the Maestro! Zampano the Brute! See more (108 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Anthony Quinn ... Zampanò

Giulietta Masina ... Gelsomina

Richard Basehart ... Il Matto - The Fool
Aldo Silvani ... Signor Giraffa
Marcella Rovere ... La Vedova
Livia Venturini ... La Suorina
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Gustavo Giorgi ... (uncredited)
Yami Kamadeva ... (uncredited)
Mario Passante ... Waiter (uncredited)
Anna Primula ... (uncredited)
Goffredo Unger ... Man Restraining Zampano from Attacking Matto (uncredited)
Nazzareno Zamperla ... Man Restraining Zampano from Attacking Matto (uncredited)
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Directed by
Federico Fellini 
 
Writing credits
Federico Fellini (story and screenplay) &
Tullio Pinelli (story and screenplay)

Tullio Pinelli (dialogue)

Ennio Flaiano (screenplay collaborator) (as Ennio Flajano)

Produced by
Dino De Laurentiis .... producer
Carlo Ponti .... producer
 
Original Music by
Nino Rota (music by)
 
Cinematography by
Otello Martelli (director of photography)
Carlo Carlini (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Leo Cattozzo (film editor)
 
Production Design by
Mario Ravasco (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Enrico Cervelli  (as E. Cervelli)
Brunello Rondi (artistic art director)
 
Costume Design by
Margherita Marinari (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Eligio Trani .... makeup artist (as E. Trani)
Dante Trani .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Angelo Cittadini .... production supervisor
Danilo Fallani .... production supervisor
Luigi Giacosi .... production supervisor
Giorgio Morra .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Moraldo Rossi .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Paolo Nuzzi .... assistant art director
Tom Jung .... poster artist (uncredited)
Tom Jung .... poster designer (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
R. Boggio .... sound
Aldo Calpini .... sound (as A. Calpini)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Roberto Gerardi .... cameraman (as Roberto Girardi)
A. Piatti .... still photographer
 
Editorial Department
Lina Caterini .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Franco Ferrara .... music conducted by
 
Other crew
Marcello Partini .... laboratories owner
Carol Riethof .... director: Trans Lux English language version (as Carol)
Peter Riethof .... director: Trans Lux English language version
Narciso Vicario .... production secretary (as Narciso Vicari)
Herman G. Weinberg .... title designer: English titles (credited in English version)
Arnoldo Foà .... voice dubbing: Anthony Quinn (uncredited)
Cesare Polacco .... voice dubbing: Aldo Silvani (uncredited)
Stefano Sibaldi .... voice dubbing: Richard Basehart (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"La strada" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
108 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:G | Australia:M (alternate rating) | Chile:18 | Finland:K-10 (1986) | Finland:K-16 (1956) | Netherlands:6 (DVD rating) | New Zealand:R16 | Norway:16 | Norway:15 (1995) | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | Sweden:15 | Switzerland:16 (canton of the Grisons) | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) | USA:Not Rated | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Director Bille August cites "La Strada" as the film that first made him want to work in film when he saw it while still in school.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: The shadows of the building and the characters in the scene at the building in the mountains changes from shot to shot and are inconsistent. For example, initially the shadows are from the left of screen from the vehicle to the building. When Gelsomina climbs out of the vehicle, her shadow goes in the opposite direction.See more »
Quotes:
The Fool:Maybe he loves you?
Gelsomina:Me?
The Fool:Why not? He is like dogs. A dog looks at you, wants to talk, and only barks.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
ZampanoSee more »

FAQ

Why does the Fool die after only a few punches from Zampanò?
See more »
20 out of 21 people found the following review useful.
A Potpourri of Vestiges Review: Fellini the Maestro! Zampano the Brute!, 7 September 2011
Author: Murtaza Ali from India

La Strada is the third Fellini movie that I have delighted myself with—the other two being Otto e Mezzo and La Dolce Vita—and coincidentally the least Felliniesque of the three, and I dare say, the simplest to interpret. And precisely that's the reason I have chosen it to begin of my eulogy on Fellini's lifelong masterful works. Fellini's staunch critics had audaciously deemed him narcissistic and his singular works self-indulgent and self-gratifying. Their myopic vision made them overlook the fact that narcissism and solipsism are the very virtues that give form to art and aesthetics. A true artist uses these traits to isolate himself from the worldly pursuits so that he can create a connection with the divine and attain a sense of enlightenment. He then pours his heart out and offers it selflessly in form of his art. Thus, the artist's apparent self-indulgence is actually a means to share his hard earned and newly acquired knowledge, gratis with the rest of the world. Fellini too like any true artist gave his audience what he thought they deserved: a product of his intellect and vision with the sole motive of titillating their senses.

La Strada is Fellini's improvisation on the epic theme of a beast and a beauty as depicted in the 1740 fairy tale 'Beauty and the Beast' and later on glorified by Victor Hugo's literary marvel 'The Hunchback of Notre-Dame'. What makes Fellini's rendition different is that even though Zampano perfectly fits into the caricature of a beast, Gelsomina falls short of the literary definition of a beauty. However, what Gelsomina lacks in pulchritude is more than made up by her celestial charm and naive disposition. These conflicting traits give Gelsomina an irresistible persona that makes her inexplicably amicable and desirable. Zampano on the contrary does not have a single trait that is likable and offers a great contrast to Gelsomina's innocuous self.

Zampano is a traveling entertainer who earns a living by performing street acts that demand extreme physical strength. Gelsomina's poor old mother sells her to brutish Zampano for a sum of 10,000 lire as a replacement for her dead daughter Rosa. Zampano ill treats Gelsomina, and despite her compliance and willingness to learn, uses brute force to teach her. She naively acquiesces even to Zampano's sexual advances. Zampano teaches her to jest and dance as well as to play drum and trumpet. One day when she finds him drunk after a night of debauchery, she decides to leave him in order to explore other possibilities. En route, she meets Il Mato—an equilibrist with a great sense of humor. Zampano manages to locate her and forcibly takes her back. Zampano joins the same circus group that Il Matto is a part of. Soon fate presents Gelsomina with an opportunity to choose between Zampano and Il Matto. La Strada goes beyond revealing Gelsomina's choice and its consequences. It accentuates that even the most bestial of the souls has a latent goodness that makes him capable of love and worthy of being loved. La Strada demonstrates that the human emotions defy reason and are driven by instinct.

Anthony Quinn arguably gives the best performance of his life as the stone cold Zampano. He effortlessly conjures up his brutish alter ego and makes him appear absolutely abominable to the viewer. As Zampano, Quinn manages to portray a caricature that has become the epitome of callous ruthlessness in cinema. Federico Fellini's wife, Giulietta Masina perfectly fits into the sketch of Gelsomina. With the portrayal of Gelsomina, Masina proves her worth as an actress. Her inspired portrayal absolves Fellini from the suspicion that her casting was inspired by motives other than talent. As Gelsomina, she not only offers a striking contrast to Quinn's part, but also manages to create a special place in the movie. In fact, by the end it becomes quite obvious that La Strada belongs to her more than Quinn or, I dare say, Fellini. In the initial few minutes, Masina looks a bit over-aged for Gelsomina's part, but she soon enchants everyone with her peculiar charm and the rest becomes completely immaterial. The cinematography of the movie is highly picturesque and presents the viewer with scenes that get etched permanently in the memory. Nino Rota's mellifluous music gives the movie a lyrical touch.

Overall, La Strada is a moving experience for aficionados and masses alike. It is a great opportunity for the students and lovers of cinema to get acquainted with Fellini's oeuvre before venturing into his more personal works like Otto e Mezzo, La Dolce Vita, Amarcord and Satyricon. 9/10

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Did Gelsomina and Zampano Have Carnal Relations? bebop63-1
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La Strada is in the top 250! nicknc1214
Richard Basehart jeffreyholmes
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