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Seven Samurai (1954) More at IMDbPro »Shichinin no samurai (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


'Seven Samurai': Why Your Favorite Movies Owe a Huge Debt to the Japanese Classic

22 April 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Why is "Seven Samurai" considered one of the greatest films ever made? I'd answer that by telling you to go watch it right now, but you probably don't have 3 hours and 27 minutes free at the moment. (It goes by super fast, though, which is one of the reasons the movie is great.)

One reason is simply the movie's vast influence. Released 60 years ago this week in Japan (on April 26, 1954), Akira Kurosawa's epic has had an incalculable impact on adventure filmmaking for six decades. Some of your favorite movies owe a huge debt to "Seven Samurai," and you may not even realize it.

The movie's plot has proved simple but durable: The residents of a farming village are beset by roving bandits until they hire a septet of ronin to defend them. Despite the lengthy running time, that's pretty much it, plus a lot of character development so that you »

- Gary Susman

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Theater List and Dates for Godzilla (1954) Re-Release

21 April 2014 10:27 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

There’s been a lot of coverage on the new movie, but don’t forget that the original Godzilla is making its way back to select Us theaters. We brought you the first announcement and now we have the initial list of locations and dates when you can check out this classic on the big screen.

“A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, »

- Jonathan James

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Criterion Collection extends Hulu streaming deal

15 April 2014 5:45 AM, PDT | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

The Criterion Collection and Hulu have extended their deal to keep the video platform as the exclusive streaming home of Criterion’s vast library of art house films.

Terms of the deal, revealed exclusively to The Associated Press, weren’t disclosed, but both Hulu and Criterion said it will run for several years.

Since 2011, Criterion Collection films have streamed exclusively on Hulu Plus, Hulu’s monthly subscription streaming service. In a fractured streaming landscape, the partnership has been a rarity, making Hulu Plus the digital home to more than 800 movies in Criterion’s singular collection.

“It was important to us »

- Associated Press

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‘Yojimbo’ is supreme entertainment under the guidance of the sensei Kurosawa

12 April 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Yojimbo

Written by Ryuzo Kikushima and Akira Kurosawa

Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Japan, 1961

It is the mid 19th century in Japan as a wandering ronin (the term designated to samurai who no longer have a master to follow), Kuwabatake Sanjuro (Toshiro Mifune), roams the windy, autumnal countryside, unsure as to the direction he should head next in search for food and money. Gambling on one particular route takes him to a small town awash in corruption and gamesmanship between two warring factions, one commandeered by Seibi (Seizaburo Kawazu) and the other by Ushitora (Kyu Sazanka). Each has associated themselves with one of the two major industries the sullen town calls its own, a sake brewery run by Tokuemon (Takashi Shimura) and a silk factory owned by Tazaemon (Katamari Fujirawa). Despite the consternation and warnings of a local tavern owner, Goji (Eijiro Tono), the ronin sees a window of glorious opportunity »

- Edgar Chaput

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Comic Book Review - Star Slammers #1

26 March 2014 12:04 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Villordsutch reviews the first issue of Star Slammers: Re-mastered #1...

"Once upon a time, there was a race of men who could out-shoot, out-fight, and out-kill anybody. They were paid fabulous sums to act as mercenaries. The practice became so lucrative, they decided to go into business. They became the most successful businessmen in history, and they called themselves…The Star Slammers!"

When I finally emerged past the pages of the Beano as a child (was never a Dandy fan) I immediately fell into the lap of 2000Ad. Occasionally I bought a copy the odd politically incorrect (even then) Warlord; but mostly it was 2000Ad and it was an odd step from the Beano with Dennis worrying Softy Walter to Dredd executing Perps, but it was a cool step and it made me appreciate the nicer things as I grew older.  In the 1980’s our comics were amazingly violent and looked fantastic too, »

- Gary Collinson

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5 Unlikely Pop Culture Influences On Nintendo Games

24 March 2014 11:51 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Nintendo

In 2014 the generations that grew up on video games, Nicktoons, and even first generation Pokemon are now of age and looking back upon their more innocent years with a new perspective. Most pop culture references, homages, and borrowed tropes flew over our heads back in the day; for example were we aware that the Squeaky Boots episode of SpongeBob SquarePants was in fact one big Edgar Allan Poe reference? That A Bug’s Life was essentially Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai…with bugs? Or how about the constant pop culture references batted over our heads in Earthbound?

Nintendo games were the lynchpin of many of our collective childhoods; no matter what time period over the past twenty five years you were born, you probably have a Nintendo game console to identify with (okay, maybe you were into Sega or PlayStation, but play along). And while we were just dumb, »

- Douglas McCausland

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Media Asia Moves Into the Mainland

20 March 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

These days, Media Asia is a pillar of the Hong Kong film industry establishment. It can boast a production pipeline connected to a large talent pool, enviable connections in mainland China, a profile in Hollywood and even a stock market listing. But it was not always so.

The company was founded 20 years ago when seven mid-ranking executives from Star Television, then News Corp.’s Hong Kong-based, pan-Asian TV unit, were fired en masse.

Known collectively as the “Seven Samurai,” the execs took with them a contract to manage Star’s massive film library, which includes all six Bruce Lee movies, as well as many early Jackie Chan, Jet Li and Michelle Yeoh titles. And, reflecting the film catalog origins, the company’s distinctive, but somewhat retro “Ma” logo initially stood for Media Assets.

Coming at the end of the “Golden Era” of Hong Kong cinema and only a few years »

- Patrick Frater

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Criterion Collection: The Hidden Fortress | Blu-ray Review

18 March 2014 9:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Criterion re-releases Akira Kurosawa’s 1958 adventure The Hidden Fortress for a ravishing blu-ray update this month, following hot on the heels of a similar refurbishing for Throne of Blood (1957). Long hailed as a “primary” influence on George LucasStar Wars, there are indeed notable structural similarities, but they’re quite superficial, as those attracted to the title based on this tidbit alone should take note. An entertaining adventure comedy that utilized widescreen technology to breathtaking effect (and represents Kurosawa’s first time using Toho Scope), it’s an impressively structured endeavor on its own, and was actually the first substantial hit for Kurosawa since 1954’s Seven Samurai.

At its core a re-dressed version of The Prince and the Pauper, two peasants in war torn feudal Japan, Tahei (Minoru Chiaki) and Matakishi (Kamatari Fujiwara) escape as prisoners of war and attempt to make their way back home to their own province. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Interview: Mark Long on ‘Rubicon’ Web Series and Recreating ‘Seven Samurai’ with SEALs

13 March 2014 11:01 AM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

In 2012, writer Mark Long teamed with writer/director Christopher McQuarrie (Jack Reacher) for the graphic novel Rubicon, a modern re-imagining of Akira Kurosawa’s seminal film, Seven Samurai. Swapping samurais for Navy SEALs, the story focuses on a group of five Seal operators who must defend the residents of a remote mountain village from the Taliban.

The ambitious undertaking was conceived as a transmedia project that would include not only the graphic novel, but also a feature film, a video game, and a web series. The latter, called Rubicon: The Beginning, premieres exclusively on Machinima today. You can check out the pilot episode below.

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Screen Rant had the opportunity to talk with Mark Long (who also co-wrote the web series) about the project and the unique role that transmedia has played in bringing it to life.

Click to continue reading Interview: Mark Long on ‘Rubicon’ Web Series and Recreating »

- Rob Frappier

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'The Hidden Fortress' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

12 March 2014 10:16 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

It seems whenever Akira Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress is mentioned it is invariably linked to George Lucas and Star Wars. The connection has been discussed for many years, perhaps best kept alive by an interview with Lucas discussing the film and its influence, which has first released on the 2001 Criterion DVD release. The interview is included once again on this new Blu-ray re-release of the film in which Lucas says the main influence Hidden Fortress had on Star Wars was the decision to tell the story from the perspective of the narrative's two lowliest characters. In the case of Star Wars that would be C-3Po and R2-D2, in Hidden Fortress it's a pair of bumbling and greedy peasants who stumble upon a general (Toshiro Mifune) and a princess (Misa Uehara) attempting to smuggle royal treasure across enemy lines. You could point to the use of long lenses, wipes »

- Brad Brevet

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Godzilla SXSW Screening Poster from Mondo and Phantom City Creative

10 March 2014 6:43 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A restored version of the original Godzilla will be playing on the big screen at SXSW tomorrow night and attendees will be treated to this new limited edition poster from Mondo and Phantom City Creative:

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai.

As directed by Ishirô Honda, with special effects by the legendary Eiji Tsuburaya, Godzilla: The Japanese Original is much darker in tone than the dumbed-down U.S. release version, which entirely eliminated the original’s underlying theme: in the Japanese version, the »

- Jonathan James

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SXSW 2014: Mondo Unleashes Incredible Godzilla Poster

10 March 2014 2:35 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The restored Japanese version of the mother of all Kaiju movies, 1954's Godzilla, or Gojira for you purists out there, will be playing the SXSW festival on Tuesday, March 11, at 9:30pm, and attendees will receive a copy of a limited edition Mondo poster in promotion of the 2014 film. Check it out!

From the Press Release

A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, »

- Uncle Creepy

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10 Great Filmmakers Best Remembered For The Wrong Films

8 March 2014 3:27 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Miramax

Usually, cinema’s true classics are the ones to last longest in the collective memory: Coppola has his Godfathers (the first two only), Hitchcock has his Vertigo, and Kurosawa has his Seven Samurai. And we do remember great directors for their “greatest films.” Most of the time.

There are some filmmakers, however, whose greatest works find less fame than some of their other movies. Often, it’s for monetary reasons: financial flops, regardless of quality, have a tendency to get forgotten, while a filmmaker’s most commercially successful film might end up being their best-remembered, regardless of quality.

This list runs on the idea that a “wrong” film is not the best work of the filmmaker in question. Of course, quality is subjective – you may disagree with some or even all the entries on this list. But even if you find the “right” movies selected to be personally disagreeable, »

- Brogan Morris

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Trailer & Poster For Godzilla: The Japanese Original Re-Release

19 February 2014 11:11 AM, PST | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Here's the press release from Toho Films and Rialto Pictures: A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24. Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai. As directed by Ishirô Honda, with special effects by the legendary Eiji Tsuburaya, Godzilla: The Japanese Original is much »

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New Trailer and Poster for ‘Godzilla: The Japanese Original’

19 February 2014 10:56 AM, PST | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

There’s a new trailer and poster for the upcoming theatrical release of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, which you can see below.

Here’s the info courtesy of Toho Films and Rialto Pictures:

A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai. »

- Philip Sticco

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Godzilla: The Japanese Original Stomping into a Theater Near You!

18 February 2014 6:29 PM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

If you think you've seen Godzilla - the Americanized Godzilla: King of the Monsters starring Raymond Burr and released in 1956, that is - you ain't seen nothin' yet.  As this year celebrates the 60th anniversary of the original film by Ishirô Honda, Rialto Pictures will debut a new restoration on April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood.  A national release will soon follow, beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.  Hit the jump for more. Watch a video announcement for Godzilla: The Japanese Original below, followed by more details on the theatrical re-release: 60th Anniversary of Landmark Monster Movie New Restoration of Uncut Version to premiere at TCM Classic Film Festival in April followed by national release from Rialto Pictures A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will »

- Dave Trumbore

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New Trailer and Poster for Godzilla (1954) Theatrical Re-Release

18 February 2014 5:15 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Earlier today, we told you that the original Godzilla was making it back to select Us theaters. The re-release has now been officially announced and we have a brand new trailer and poster for you to check out:

“A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same »

- Jonathan James

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Godzilla 60th Anniversary Trailer and Poster

18 February 2014 4:46 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Celebrate the re-release of Godzilla: The Japanese Original as it returns remastered and uncut for its 60th Anniversary. We have the trailer and poster, followed by all the details behind the return of the world's most iconic monster!

A new restoration of Godzilla, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations, and remakes, will debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York's Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released here in 1956 as Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original's 98 minute running time. Raymond Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai. »

- MovieWeb

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New Restoration of Uncut 'Godzilla: The Japanese Original' to Premiere at TCM Film Fest, Followed by Rialto Release

18 February 2014 10:35 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Exciting news of monstrous proportions: A new restoration of classic “Godzilla: The Japanese Original,” which spawned six decades of sequels, imitations and remakes, is set to debut April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood. It then gets a national release from Rialto Pictures, kicking off at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.Originally released stateside in 1956 as “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” Ishiro Honda’s masterwork suffered from an atrociously cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action. Only one hour was used of the original’s 98 minute running time.  Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura (“The Seven Samurai”). With special effects by Eiji Tsuburaya, “Godzilla: The Japanese Original” is much darker in tone, with the monster working as a clear metaphor for nuclear menace. »

- Beth Hanna

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Alexander Payne Reveals What All the Best Actors Know

11 February 2014 1:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Alexander Payne’s “Nebraska” is up for Oscar in six categories, all of them big. The filmmaker, who splits his time between L.A. and his native state, spoke with Variety about his upbringing and influences — and about working with Bruce Dern and June Squibb, who’ve been acting since before he was born.

What did you learn about shooting in B&W?

I’ve been looking at black-and-white films my whole life, we all have. It felt comforting to look at the monitor; it felt almost like coming home. Everyone acts so nonplussed about it, but our great film heritage is in black-and-white. I think any filmmaker worth his or her salt aspires to make a black-and-white film at some point in their career.

What did you learn about acting from your stars?

The old pros are my favorite actors to work with, and I’ve been lucky enough »

- Tim Gray

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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