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Shichinin no samurai
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Seven Samurai (1954) More at IMDbPro »Shichinin no samurai (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
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Director:
Writers:
Akira Kurosawa (screenplay) &
Shinobu Hashimoto (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Seven Samurai on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
19 November 1956 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Will Take Its Place With the Seven Greatest Films of All Time! See more »
Plot:
A poor village under attack by bandits recruits seven unemployed samurai to help them defend themselves. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Arguably, the best samurai film ever made See more (559 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Toshirô Mifune ... Kikuchiyo (as Toshiro Mifune)

Takashi Shimura ... Kambei Shimada
Keiko Tsushima ... Shino
Yukiko Shimazaki ... Wife (as Yukio Shimazaki)
Kamatari Fujiwara ... Farmer Manzo
Daisuke Katô ... Shichiroji (as Daisake Kato)
Isao Kimura ... Katsushiro (as Ko Kimura)
Minoru Chiaki ... Heihachi
Seiji Miyaguchi ... Kyuzo
Yoshio Kosugi ... Farmer Mosuke
Bokuzen Hidari ... Farmer Yohei
Yoshio Inaba ... Gorobei Katayama
Yoshio Tsuchiya ... Farmer Rikichi
Kuninori Kôdô ... Old Man Gisaku
Eijirô Tôno ... Thief (as Eijiro Tono)
Kichijirô Ueda ... Bandit Scout (as Ueda Kichijiro)
Jun Tatara ... Coolie A
Atsushi Watanabe ... Bun Seller
Toranosuke Ogawa ... Grandfather of Kidnapped Girl
Isao Yamagata ... Samurai
Sôjin Kamiyama ... Blind Player
Gen Shimizu ... Samurai Who Kicks Farmers
Keiji Sakakida ... Gosaku
Shinpei Takagi ... Bandit Chieftain (as Shimpei Takagi)
Shin Ôtomo ... Bandit Second-in-Command
Toshio Takahara ... Samurai with Gun
Hiroshi Sugi ... Tea Shop Owner
Hiroshi Hayashi ... Weak Ronin
Sachio Sakai ... 2nd Coolie
Sôkichi Maki ... Strong-Looking Samurai
Ichirô Chiba ... Buddhist Priest
Noriko Sengoku ... Wife of Gono Family
Noriko Honma ... Woman Farmer
Masanobu Ôkubo ... Samurai
Etsurô Saijô ... Bandit
Minoru Itô ... Samurai
Haruya Sakamoto ... Samurai
Gorô Sakurai ... Samurai
Hideo Shibuya ... Bandit
Kiyoshi Kamoda ... Samurai
Senkichi Ômura ... Bandit Who Escapes
Takashi Narita ... Bandit Who Escapes
Shôichi Hirose ... Bandit
Kôji Uno ... Bandit
Masaaki Tachibana ... Bandit
Kamayuki Tsubono ... Bandit
Taiji Naka ... Bandit
Chindanji Miyagawa ... Bandit
Shigemi Sunagawa ... Bandit
Akira Tani ... Bandit
Akio Kusama ... Bandit
Ryûtarô Amami ... Bandit
Jun Mikami ... Bandit

Haruo Nakajima ... Bandit
Sanpei Mine ... Farmer
Masahide Matsushita ... Samurai
Kaneo Ikeda ... Samurai
Takuzô Kumagaya ... Gisaku's Son (as Jirô Kumagaya)
Ippei Kawagoe ... Farmer
Jirô Suzukawa ... Farmer
Junpei Natsuki ... Farmer
Kyôichi Kamiyama ... Farmer
Haruo Suzuki ... Farmer
Gorô Amano ... Farmer
Akira Kitchôji ... Farmer (as Hikaru Kitchôji)
Kôji Iwamoto ... Farmer
Hiroshi Akitsu ... Gono Husband
Akira Yamada ... Farmer
Kazuo Imai ... Farmer
Eisuke Nakanishi ... Farmer
Toku Ihara ... Farmer
Hideo Ôtsuka ... Farmer
Shû Ôe ... Farmer
Yasuhisa Tsutsumi ... Farmer in Front of Gono
Yasumasa Ônishi ... Farmer (as Yasuo Ônishi)
Tsuneo Katagiri ... Farmer in Front of Gono
Megeru Shimoda ... Farmer
Masayoshi Kawabe ... Farmer
Shigeo Katô ... Farmer
Yoshikazu Kawamata ... Farmer
Takeshi Seki ... 3rd Coolie
Haruko Toyama ... Gisaku's Daughter-in-Law
Tsuruko Mano ... Woman Farmer in Front of Gono
Matsue Ono ... Woman Farmer
Tsurue Ichimanji ... Woman Farmer (as Tazue Ichimanji)
Masako Ôshiro ... Woman Farmer
Kyôko Ozawa ... Woman Farmer
Michiko Kadono ... Farmer's Wife
Toshiko Nakano ... Farmer's Wife
Shizuko Azuma ... Farmer's Wife
Keiko Mori ... Farmer's Wife
Michiko Kawabe ... Farmer's Wife
Yûko Togawa ... Farmer's Wife
Yayoko Kitano ... Farmer's Wife
Misao Suyama ... Woman Farmer
Toriko Takahara ... Woman Farmer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Takeshi Katô ... Samurai Wandering Through Town (uncredited)

Tatsuya Nakadai ... Samurai Wandering Through Town (uncredited)
Ken Utsui ... Samurai Wandering Through Town (uncredited)
Ren Yamamoto ... Farmer (uncredited)

Directed by
Akira Kurosawa 
 
Writing credits
Akira Kurosawa (screenplay) &
Shinobu Hashimoto (screenplay) &
Hideo Oguni (screenplay)

Produced by
Sôjirô Motoki .... producer (as Sojiro Motoki)
 
Original Music by
Fumio Hayasaka (music)
 
Cinematography by
Asakazu Nakai (photography) (as Asaichi Nakai)
 
Film Editing by
Akira Kurosawa 
 
Production Design by
Takashi Matsuyama 
 
Art Direction by
Sô Matsuyama (art direction) (as So Matsuyama)
 
Costume Design by
Kôhei Ezaki 
Mieko Yamaguchi 
 
Makeup Department
Midori Nakajo .... hair stylist
Junjirô Yamada .... hair
Junjirô Yamada .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Hiroshi Nezu .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Sakae Hirosawa .... assistant director
Hiromichi Horikawa .... assistant director
Toshi Kaneko .... assistant director
Masaya Shimizu .... assistant director
Yasuyoshi Tajitsu .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Kôhei Ezaki .... art consultant
Kôichi Hamamura .... property master
Yoshirô Muraki .... assistant art director
 
Sound Department
Ichirô Minawa .... sound effects editor
Masanao Uehara .... sound assistant
Fumio Yanoguchi .... recording
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Masao Fukuda .... still photographer
Mitsuo Kaneko .... assistant lighting technician
Shigeru Mori .... lighting
Takao Saitô .... assistant camera
 
Editorial Department
Hiroshi Nezu .... editing manager
 
Music Department
Masaru Satô .... assistant to composer
 
Other crew
Shigeru Endo .... archery
Kôhei Ezaki .... folklore researcher (as Kohei Ezaki)
Yuji Hamada .... accountant
Ienori Kaneko .... archery
Toshio Nakane .... acting office
Teruyo Nogami .... script supervisor
Takeharu Shimada .... production assistant
Yoshio Sugino .... fencing
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Shichinin no samurai" - Japan (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
207 min | 160 min (international version) | Argentina:163 min | Sweden:202 min (2002 re-release) | UK:150 min (original version) | UK:190 min (1991 re-release) | USA:158 min (original version) (cut) | USA:203 min (re-release) | USA:207 min (restored version) | Spain:202 min (DVD edition)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono | Stereo (re-release prints)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:PG | Australia:M (VHS version) | Brazil:10 | Canada:PG | Canada:G (Quebec) | Czech Republic:U | Denmark:15 | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:12 | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | South Korea:15 | Spain:T | Sweden:15 (original rating) | Sweden:11 (re-rating) (2002) | Switzerland:14 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1991) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:16
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This was the first film on which Akira Kurosawa used multiple cameras, so he wouldn't interrupt the flow of the scenes and could edit the film together as he pleased in post-production. He used the multiple camera set-up on every subsequent film.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: During the first scene when the people in the village are discussing what to do with the bandits, it's visible that they are wearing bald-wigs.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Bandit second-in-command:We'll take this place next.
Bandit Chief:We took it last autumn. They haven't got anything worth taking yet. Let's wait.
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

Who is the best Samurai?
Why don't the Bandits just leave them alone? The village was clearly well defended and armed.
Is 'Seven Samurai' based on a book?
See more »
100 out of 103 people found the following review useful.
Arguably, the best samurai film ever made, 25 May 2010

Though its biblical connotation is not the happiest one ("Seven Deadly Sins") number seven, omnipresent in our (7 days a) weekly cycles, seems to have been a lucky number in the world of cinema. Several very solid and some great movies have this number in their title, starting with gag-wise incredibly inventive Seven Chances (1925) from genius of silent era Buster Keaton, Frank Borzage's silent version of classic melodrama 7th Heaven (1927), Walt Disney's first feature-length animated movie, Snowhite and Seven Dwarfs (1940), recognized as an instant classic and remained so ever after, Stanley Donen's ear-pleasing, eye-riveting musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), staged in western milieu, with an outstanding dance sequence, Ingmar Bergman's literally Death-defying, answers-to-reasons-for-human-misfortune-seeking masterpiece, Det sjunde inseglet ("The Seventh Seal") (1957), Billy Wilder's Seven Year Itch (1957), a clever and amusing first collaboration with incomparable Marilyn Monroe (a worm-up for their second, bigger if not decisive step in taboos-of-the-motion-picture-production-code-breaking, brilliant comedy Some Like It Hot (1959)), up to newer examples like David Fincher's disturbing drama Se7en (1995), one of the finest Hollywood movies of the 90's, as well as Tsui Hark's Chat Gim ("Seven Swords") (2005), a stunner in the department of action sequences from the often under-appreciated genre Wuxia, originating from Chinese literature.

However, even among such illustrious examples of movie-making par excellence, one movie holds a special place, Shichinin no samurai ("Seven Samurai") (1954) from the legendary Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. This movie doesn't seem to lack anything that an avid movie consumer, in particular samurai genre admirer, might be wishing for.

It is not easy to say anything new about the one of the most analyzed and scrutinized movies of the film history. Nevertheless, and despite being eventually only repeated, it shall be mentioned that movie has a simple but very engaging story - a group of peasants, representing a village, periodically stormed by gang of bandits, looting their crops and other possessions, hires several wandering ronins (masterless samurai) to help them protect the village - not without lucid observations on the possibility of social interaction between members of different classes during the almost seven centuries long feudal history (1185–1868) of Japan.

Characterization is excellent, and though having clear stand-outs in samurai's true leader, Kambei (Takashi Shimura), a wise tactician of the exceptional valor, as well as in the exuberantly uncontrollable Kikuchiyo (Toshiro Mifune), messy in its appearance and blustering in its manner, yet, a peasant descendant himself, making for a perfect link between the samurai and their employers, all other samurai are memorable, as well, sporting wide variety of personality traits. In joining the village protection campaign, hired for nothing more than a regular meal for as long as providing a service, thus primarily hoping to finally fill their starving stomachs, each one of them was driven by different additional motives, whether they were challenged to test their bravery, fighting skills and tactics, seeking for excitement and recognition, trying to regain pride and glory of the past days, just reaching out for that human touch (cross-class communication, even mere courtship promising relationship) they have been deprived of, or simply interested in its noble cause.

Together with true highlights in realistically choreographed battle scenes, showing all the pain and misery of excessive violence on the reverse of heroism, that even defenders cannot avoid resorting to, sadly announcing inevitable decline of the samurai and their ways exposed to new artless technology, unbecomingly dying ambushed by distant shots from the muskets, while ingloriously stuck in the village muds... it all makes for a compelling narrative.

Though triumphant in their common task to protect the village, unlikely alliance between samurai and peasants is ultimately doomed to fail. In the short run, it gives expected results, but in the long run, does not stand the chance. That is so loudly, although in fact silently, expressed at the end, when peasants don't even care to join the surviving samurai in their mourning over the fallen ones, not even giving the last well deserved respect to those who have helped them withstand fierce attacks, prevail and ultimately defeat bandits, and, in doing so, most of them given their lives. Peasants simply continue with their daily chores, while surviving samurai have to leave the village, like they have never existed, sadly symbolizing their ultimate destiny: slowly but surely stepping off the future pages of the history books.

Seven Samurai, the movie, is rightfully considered as the one that has redefined samurai film in its contemporary perception, and dawned almost two decades long string of successes, instantly becoming the brightest example of thus revived, uniquely provocative and entertaining sub-genre, unknown as such in the country of its origin, classified there within a broader genre, jidaigeki (a period drama, often describing events from pre-modern era of the Edo period, marking the governance of Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1868), relatively peaceful times for Japan's long history of civil wars, as opposed to gendaigeki, films treating contemporary matters), and by IMDb standards, as an action drama, occasionally historical, when based on real events.

Originating in the Edo-era Far East, it has inspired equally successful, star-studded (Y. Brynner, S. McQueen, C. Bronson, J. Coburn, E. Wallach, R. Vaughn, H. Buchholz, B. Dexter) Hollywood remake, The Magnificent Seven (1960), conveniently situated in the U.S. West of 19th century, as well as three lesser sequels, Return of... (1966), Guns of... (1969), and ...Ride! (1972).

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