On the Waterfront
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 39 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Toronto Spotlight: ‘The Drop’ Scribe Dennis Lehane On Using Small Time Crime To Trigger Big Time Characters

6 September 2014 4:03 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Dennis Lehane has had a more charmed run that most authors, watching his superb novels Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone and Shutter Island get turned into fine movies. Now he’s adapted one of his short stories into the Fox Searchlight drama The Drop, with Bullhead helmer Michael R. Roskam launching the film at Toronto last night and a cast led by Tom Hardy, James Gandolfini, Noomi Rapace, Bullhead‘s Matthias Schoenarts and John Ortiz. Here, Lehane discusses what it’s like to have his dialogue made better by great actors, and what Hollywood owes authors in turning their books into films.

Deadline: You have this gift for creating memorably desperate tough guy characters on the fringes of the criminal world. Where did the inspiration for Animal Rescue come from?

Lehane: It started just with an image. A guy walking in the snow, down a street, and he hears a noise. »

- Mike Fleming Jr

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Academy's Special 2014 Honorees: Veterans Belafonte, Carrière, Miyazaki and - Finally - O'Hara

29 August 2014 4:02 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Honorary Oscars 2014: Hayao Miyazaki, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Maureen O’Hara; Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award goes to Harry Belafonte

One good thing about the creation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Governors Awards — an expedient way to remove the time-consuming presentation of the (nearly) annual Honorary Oscar from the TV ratings-obsessed, increasingly youth-oriented Oscar show — is that each year up to four individuals can be named Honorary Oscar recipients, thus giving a better chance for the Academy to honor film industry veterans while they’re still on Planet Earth. (See at the bottom of this post a partial list of those who have gone to the Great Beyond, without having ever received a single Oscar statuette.) In 2014, the Academy’s Board of Governors has selected a formidable trio of honorees: Japanese artist and filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki, 73; French screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière, 82; and Irish-born Hollywood actress Maureen O’Hara, »

- Andre Soares

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James Gandolfini, Tom Hardy tangle with real tough guys in 'The Drop'

27 August 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

In The Drop, Tom Hardy and James Gandolfini play two Brooklyn cousins trying to make ends meet on the fringe of gangster life without sticking their necks out too far. Gandolfini, in what is his final onscreen performance, plays Cousin Marv, the manager of the seedy bar who once was respected and feared in the neighborhood but now settles for something less. Hardy plays Bob, the detached bartender who sees and hears nothing while he makes the nightly money drops that keep the business alive.

But when Bob finds an abandoned puppy and meets a pretty woman (Noomi Rapace), his »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Movies This Week: August 8-14, 2014

8 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

The Austin Film Society kicks off a brand new series featuring classic films from Roger Corman (Jette's preview) with a related documentary called That Guy Dick Miller, about the famed character actor. Tonight's screening will feature a post-film Q&A with Mr. Miller via Skype. It will be followed by a 35mm screening of Corman's 1959 feature A Bucket Of Blood, which features a great lead performance by Dick Miller. The film will also play again on Sunday afternoon.

On Wednesday, Whitey: The United States Of America V. James J. Bulger (from Joe Berlinger, the director of Paradise Lost) will be featured for Doc Nights (Elizabeth's preview), and this month's Essential Cinema series with the incredible Barbara Stanwyck (Elizabeth's preview) finds her on Thursday night starring in a 1937 drama called Internes Can't Take Money, screening in a rare 35mm print. 

At the Paramount's Summer Classic Film Series, you can catch a »

- Matt Shiverdecker

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Gorilla at Large

5 August 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Talk about descriptive titles! This generic little indie, set in a Long Beach amusement park terrorized by an escaped gorilla, was one of only three 3-D productions released by 20th Century-Fox in the fifties. It benefits from an unusually good cast including Oscar nominee Lee J. Cobb (the same year he made On the Waterfront!) and contract player Anne Bancroft, who probably didn't include this one on her resume. George Barrows fills out the ape suit a year after playing the diving helmet-headed gorilla in Robot Monster.

The post Gorilla at Large appeared first on Trailers From Hell.

»

- TFH Team

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Robert De Niro's 10 best performances: Deer Hunter, Raging Bull

2 August 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

In 1995 and 1997, Robert Anthony De Niro Jr. had Heat and Jackie Brown released into cinemas. Not his best films or his best performances, perhaps, but mesmerising work in excellent pictures directed by master filmmakers: the former saw him convince for Michael Mann as the cool, meticulous leader of a gang of career criminals; the latter had Quentin Tarantino give viewers a dim crim whose uncontrollable anger contributes to the unravelling of a heist.

For a whole generation of moviegoers who have grown up since, however, the adulation that's universally showered upon De Niro must be perplexing. Occasionally he summons up a portion of his old intensity – his turns in What Just Happened, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle are the (slim) picks of the last 15 years – but for anyone who got into movies from the late '90s on, he's the funny guy in Analyze This and Meet The Parents, »

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Happy Birthday 'On The Waterfront'! Watch Visual Essay On Aspect Ratio Plus The Film's Most Famous Scene

28 July 2014 11:54 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It had class, it was a contender, and sixty years ago today, it all started when Elia Kazan's "On The Waterfront" opened in theatres across the country. The film about squandered ambition, love, corruption and basic human decency has gone down as one of the finest American dramas ever produced, winning eight Oscars (including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Best Supporting Actress) and has, to this day, a single sequence that has some of the greatest screen acting you'll ever see. And so, with Comic-Con in the rearview, maybe it's a good time for a palette cleanser. Below you can check out The Criterion Collection's visual essay on the aspect ratio of the film (it was presented in a couple of formats upon release as they'll explain, and the boutique label offers a couple of options in their release of the movie). And after that, the scene »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Lip Service: The Top 10 Movie Catchphrases

11 July 2014 5:46 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The obligatory movie catchphrase…memorable golden dialogue for the cinematic soul. What film fan does not enjoy reciting and repeating their favorite movie quotes? After all, there are countless catchphrases in films–some are famous, some are familiar, some are obscure. Still, paraphrasing movie quips has become an art onto itself?

So what are your all-time movie catchphrases? Perhaps it is Jimmy Cagney’s “You dirt rat…you killed my brother?”. Maybe it is Cary Grant’s “Judy, Judy, Judy”? Or how about Lauren Bacall’s “You know how to whistle, don’t you? Just blow…” Whatever movie catchphrases catches your fancy is fine so long as it brings up memories of the film or film characters tat have made a big impression on your cinema experiences.

The Lip Service: The Top 10 Movie Catchphrases selections are: (in alphabetical order according to film title):

1.) “Fasten your seat belts, it »

- Frank Ochieng

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Best Criterion Titles to Buy During Barnes & Noble's 50% Off Sale

30 June 2014 3:54 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Barnes & Noble has just kicked off their 50% off Criterion sale and while it's impossible to suggest titles that will suit everyone looking to beef up their collection at this perfect time of year, I will do my best to offer some suggestions. Let's get to it... My Absolute First Pick I am almost done going through this collection and it was a collection I got for Christmas under these exact circumstances. Typically priced at $224.99, you can now get this amazing set of 25 Zatoichi films for only $112. Box sets, in my opinion, are what sales like this were made for. Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman Next Ten Recommendations It isn't easy so this is a collection of just some of my favorite films (of all-time and within the collection) and a little variety, though pretty much my standard, go to Criterion first picks, especially if you are just starting out. Persona Breathless »

- Brad Brevet

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Trouble With a Cause: The Top 10 Movie Rebels

28 June 2014 6:17 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Now what would the movies be like if everybody on the big screen was a conformist and blandly played by the rules? Every now and then it can be quite therapeutic to have a bad apple shape our rigid outlook with a dosage of cynicism in cinema. Whether intentionally unruly or merely questioning the status quo movie rebels can be compellingly entertaining for various reasons.

So who are your choice big screen rabble-rousers that like to stir the pot and cause dissension in the name of justice or just plain anti-establishment? In Trouble With a Cause: The Top 10 Movie Rebels let us take a look at some of the on-screen troublemakers with a taste for colorful turmoil, shall we?

The selections for Trouble With a Cause: The Top 10 Movie Rebels are (in alphabetical order according to the film titles):

1.) Brad Whitewood, Jr. from At Close Range (1986)

In director James Foley »

- Frank Ochieng

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Brotherly love: 5 must-see movies that show blood is thicker than water

27 June 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Mistaken for Strangers, the documentary about The National frontman Matt Berninger and his wayward filmmaker brother Tom, arrives in UK cinemas today (June 27), and is a reminder that siblings can sometimes make for great cinema.

Whether it's the constant squabbling of Will Ferrell and John C Reilly in Step Brothers, the epic Corleone rivalry in The Godfather or Marlon Brando and Rod Steiger in On the Waterfront, brothers can make for highly-charged drama.

The National: Matt, Tom Berninger on their rock doc Mistaken for Strangers

The National to release "huge bonus version" of Mistaken for Strangers doc

Digital Spy takes a look back at 5 movies about brothers - from entirely different genres - that are essential viewing for film fans.

Dead Ringers (1988)

A typically ambitious psychological thriller from David Cronenberg, Dead Ringers saw Jeremy Irons take on the role of Beverly and Elliot Mantle, identical twin brothers who work as »

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List Mania

25 June 2014 7:21 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Two interesting lists came out in the past couple of days which are worth discussing / poring over / loving deeply / fuming at for various reasons.

Three Lgbt Films I'm Always Wishing More People Had Seen. Paris is Burning (#3), Lilies (#64), and Show Me Love (#168)

• The Advocate crowd-sourced the 175 Essential Lgbt Movies list which is a mix of non gay movies that gays love and actual queer films. Brokeback Mountain (2005) tops the list and the top ten is really cool and varied though it's obviously skewing toward historically important cinematic breakthroughs (regardless of quality) which I suppose explains the high ranking of Philadelphia (1993) which is not a good movie and so so timid and Making Love (1982), just outside the top ten which is interesting and way less timid than many movies which came after it (how's that for an odd turn of events) but it's also stiffly made. I've seen all but 34 of »

- NATHANIEL R

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Tom Hanks: The Top 25 (Best Actor)

23 June 2014 12:57 PM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Yes, this time around I’ll be tackling one of the biggest of the big eight categories in an effort not to save them all for very last, much like with last week. This one is arguably the second biggest of them all…the Best Actor field. This is as prestigious a category as there is ladies and gentlemen. I could go on and on in preparation right now, but at this point I know how the game works here. You all mostly just want to see the lists that I do anyhow, so I have no problem obliging you good people there in that particular regard once again. All you have to do is just be patient over the next paragraph or so and you’ll get the goods front and center… This time around, I’m once again going with the ever popular overview route for the discussion as you might have guessed. »

- Joey Magidson

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Movie Poster of the Week: Jean Grémillon’s “Daïnah la métisse” and Christie’s Vintage Film Posters auction

21 June 2014 8:43 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

This week, Christie’s, the world’s largest fine arts auction house, is hosting an inaugural online-only sale of what are billed as Vintage Film Posters, though it is an eclectic collection of old and new. There are plenty of familiar faces, like Reynold Brown’s Attack of the 50Ft. Woman, Saul Bass’s The Man With the Golden Arm, Giorgio Olivetti’s La Dolce Vita, Bob Peak’s My Fair Lady, and Philip Castle’s Clockwork Orange, but what is interesting in terms of the auction market is the inclusion of a number of recent Mondo posters by Tyler Stout, Todd Slater and Laurent Durieux. The auction also includes La Boca’s already-classic, four-year-old set of silkscreen teasers for Black Swan.

The poster that really caught my eye, however, and one I’d never seen before, is this stunning Deco design by one Ram Richman for Jean Grémillon’s »

- Adrian Curry

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Steven Spielberg: The Top 25 (Best Director)

16 June 2014 9:43 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Here we go again folks with another Top 25 article today, and it’s one of the big ones. Yes, this time around I’ll be tackling one of the biggest of the big eight categories in an effort not to save them all for very last. This one is the Best Director field. This is another category that usually has a rather big tie in with Best Picture, as you’ll see below to some degree once again. As always, I have a few specific titles I’ll be citing in detail later on in this piece, but by now I know how the game works here. You all mostly just want to see the lists I do anyhow, so I have no problem obliging you good folks there in that particular regard once again. All you have to do is just be patient over the next paragraph or so »

- Joey Magidson

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Leviathan | 2014 Cannes Review

2 June 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

On the Waterfront: Zvyagintsev’s Sprawling Opus of a Modern, Devouring Regime

Back with his fourth feature, Leviathan, Russian auteur Andrey Zvyagintsev succeeds in cinematic sublimity with this multilayered and operatic exploration of the crushing corruption of an unchecked regime. While each of his films have taken home prestigious awards (The Return won the Golden Lion at Venice in 2003, The Banishment snagged Best Actor at Cannes in 2007 while 2011’s Elena roped the Special Jury Prize for Un Certain Regard), this latest feature should solidify his unparalleled ascension as the most important auteur to rise out of Russia since Andrey Tarkovsky. Time may prove his to be the more potent title, a damning examination of the turpitude bred by an archaic and untoward establishment.

Living in the home that he’s built with his own hands on the waterfront of the Barents Sea, Kolya (Alexei Serebryakov), has recently been notified »

- Nicholas Bell

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One of Earliest Surviving Academy Award Nominees in Acting Categories Dead at 88

1 June 2014 2:41 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Joan Lorring, 1945 Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee, dead at 88: One of the earliest surviving Academy Award nominees in the acting categories, Lorring was best known for holding her own against Bette Davis in ‘The Corn Is Green’ (photo: Joan Lorring in ‘Three Strangers’) Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee Joan Lorring, who stole the 1945 film version of The Corn Is Green from none other than Warner Bros. reigning queen Bette Davis, died Friday, May 30, 2014, in the New York City suburb of Sleepy Hollow. So far, online obits haven’t mentioned the cause of death. Lorring, one of the earliest surviving Oscar nominees in the acting categories, was 88. Directed by Irving Rapper, who had also handled one of Bette Davis’ biggest hits, the 1942 sudsy soap opera Now, Voyager, Warners’ The Corn Is Green was a decent if uninspired film version of Emlyn Williams’ semi-autobiographical 1938 hit play about an English schoolteacher, »

- Andre Soares

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Elia Kazan's Private Letters: Sleeping With Marilyn, Chastising Beatty and Discovering Newman

10 April 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This story first appeared in the April 18 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. Director Elia Kazan remains one of Hollywood's most polarizing figures. He directed such classics as A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), On the Waterfront (1954), East of Eden (1955) and Splendor in the Grass (1961). The native New Yorker's career began on the stage and, as such, Kazan was an actor's director; he discovered Marlon Brando, James Dean and Warren Beatty. He also loved writers and proved a nimble collaborator for such icons as Tennessee Williams and John Steinbeck. But when he testified before the House Un-

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- Andy Lewis

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: The Pawnbroker

4 April 2014 2:29 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 22, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Rod Steiger is The Pawnbroker.

Rod Steiger (On the Waterfront) earned a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his performance in the classic 1964 drama The Pawnbroker, directed by the great Sidney Lumet (12 Angry Men, Network).

Steiger plays Sol Nazerman, a survivor of a WWII Nazi death camp where his wife, parents and children were murdered. His soul robbed of hope, he takes refuge in misery and a bitter condemnation of humanity while managing a Harlem pawnshop subjected to an endless parade of prostitutes, pimps and thieves.

The film co-stars Geraldine Fitzgerald (Wuthering Heights), Brock Peters (To Kill a Mockingbird), Raymond St. Jacques (Cotton Comes to Harlem) and.Jamie Sanchez (The Wild Bunch).

Shot in gorgeous black-and-white by respected cinematographer Boris Kaufman (On the Waterfront) and featuring a memorably evocative trumpet score by Quincy Jones, The Pawnbroker is making its Blu-ray »

- Laurence

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

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