Magnificent Obsession (1954) - News Poster

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Gun Fury 3-D

Rock Hudson and Donna Reed star in a kidnapping-vengeance-pursuit western filmed in large part in gorgeous Sedona, Arizona, in 3-D and (originally) Technicolor. It’s another 3-D treasure from the 1950s boom years. The trailer is in 3-D too.

Gun Fury 3-D

3-D Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1953 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Rock Hudson, Donna Reed, Phil Carey, Roberta Haynes, Leo Gordon, Lee Marvin, Neville Brand.

Cinematography: Lester WhiteMusical Director (Stock Music): Mischa Bakaleinikoff

Written by Irving Wallace, Roy Huggins

Produced by Lewis Rachmil

Directed by Raoul Walsh

I have a new theory for why the 1950s 3-D craze only lasted about 2.5 years: they couldn’t find any more one-eyed directors to make them.

Gun Fury arrived at the end of 1953, in the thick of what would be called the ‘fad’ of 3-D. Columbia Pictures jumped into ‘depth pictures’ as if it were a gimmick,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

All That Hollywood Allows: Douglas Sirk’s Brilliant Melodramas

The European filmmaker directed a series of deceptively complex melodramas in the 1950s.“This is the dialectic — there is a very short distance between high art and trash, and trash that contains an element of craziness is by this very quality nearer to art” — Douglas Sirk

Douglas Sirk was born in Germany in 1900, and began his career in the early 1920s working in theater. In 1922, he directed his first production — an adaptation of Hermann Bossdorf’s Stationmaster Death, and from then on he became one of the most respected theater directors in Weimar Germany. Then, in 1934, he took a job as a film director at Ufa, the biggest studio in Germany at the time.

In 1941, Sirk left Germany and began working as a director in Hollywood. His early films, such as the WWII drama Hitler’s Madman (1942) have largely been forgotten. These early films varied in genre — he directed war films (Mystery Submarine), historical dramas (A Scandal in Paris), film
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Scott Reviews Too Late for Tears and Woman on the Run [Arrow Films Blu-ray]

There are two major sides to the film noir coin, as I see it – the psychological and the practical. Now, the practical noir is fairly straightforward; maybe a detective has to solve a crime, or someone gets themselves in over their head with some scheme gone wrong. There’s a problem to be solved, and the protagonist either overcomes or becomes consumed by it. Double Indemnity, Where the Sidewalk Ends, Night and the City, The Killing, and The Maltese Falcon fit into this section rather well. The psychological noir uses genre tropes to investigate someone’s soul, usually stemming from their nearness to sin and death. Scarlet Street, Laura, Female on the Beach, The Chase, Sunset Boulevard, and Kiss Me Deadly fit the bill. Obviously films in each use elements of the other to shade the characters or move the story along, but the texture and flavor is notably distinct,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Terence Davies Talks ‘Sunset Song,’ Being Drawn to Hardship, and the Simplicity of Great Stories

Terence Davies’ films deal with repressed desire, longing, and emotional pain that springs from the depths of his characters’ souls, and yet, in person, the great British auteur is undoubtedly the funniest person in the room. He is all smiles and jokes as we sit down to discuss his glorious Sunset Song, entering a limited release this week, and a retrospective of his work at the Museum of the Moving Image. It makes sense that he is joyful rather than somber, because it makes one feel a sort of relief knowing that levity was welcomed between takes on haunting dramas such as Distant Voices, Still Lives and The Deep Blue Sea. In Sunset Song, Davies takes on the first part of a trilogy written by Lewis Grassic Gibbons, in which we meet farm girl Chris Guthrie (a luminous Agyness Deyn) as she is forced to take on the reins of her life in pre-wwi Scotland.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Throne of Blood's Best Shots - A Visual Index

After realizing that we'd never featured an Akira Kurosawa on Hit Me With Your Best Shot, we obviously had to. Ran (1985) was tempting but it gets a lot of attention already. So we opted to watch his other Shakespeare inspired masterpiece, Throne of Blood (1957) which is still the best Macbeth movie even if its more Macbeth-inspired than traditionally adapted.

If you've never seen it, give it a shot. It's gorgeous and haunting and unlike most Shakespeare films grippingly compact at only 110 minutes.

Hit Me With Your Best Shot(s)

Throne of Blood (1957)

Director: Akira Kurosawa; Cinematographer: Asakazu Nakai 

Click on any of the 11 images to be taken to its accompanying article

Throne of Blood teaches us how to watch it. 

-Antagony & Ecstasy

The minute we see Isuzu Yamada as Lady Asaji in this cold spare room, we know exactly where things will go...

-Scopophiliac at the Cinema 

One of my
See full article at FilmExperience »

Visual Index: Best Shots from "Witness"

Hit Me With Your Best Shot revisited Witness (1985) this week to celebrate the continuing excellence of the Australian cinematographer John Seale. It was such an unexpected treat to see him doing ambitious ravishing and inspired work as a septugenarian (Mad Max Fury Road) that rivals anything he did in his 30s (Careful He Might Hear You), 40s (Rain Man) or 50s (The English Patient, The Talented Mr Ripley) and though he didn't win a second Oscar he did win our renewed ecstatic fandom. Seale's earliest Oscar nomination came for his work lensing the gorgeous moving cop drama Witness (1985). Here are the results of our "Best Shot" challenge from the participants. The more eyeballs the merrier so join us one of these weeks alright?

Witness (1985)

Directed by Peter Weir. Shot by John Seale

Click on any of the 12 images to be directed to the corresponding articles

(Nominated for 8 Academy Awards including
See full article at FilmExperience »

Hit Me With Daredevil Season 2's Best Shots

I asked Hit Me With Your Best Shot participants to choose an episode or multiple episodes from Daredevil's second season on Netflix -- however they wanted to do it -- and write up their choice for a Best Shot. Because the second season has been available for less than a week, we're eschewing the traditional Visual Index so you don't have anything spoiled for you. Read with caution and quit on the episodes you haven't yet seen.

9 heroic blogs

Blue Canary (S1) 

Awards Madness (S2. Episode 1)

The Film Experience (S2. Episodes 1-3)

Sorta That Guy (S2. Episodes 1-3)

Cinematic Corner (S2. Episodes 1-6) 

Magnificent Obsession (Entire Second Season)

I Want to Believe (Entire Second Season)

Wick's Picks (Entire Second Season + a little Jessica Jones

Movie Motorbreath (Entire Second Season) 

Next Tuesday:  We're a little early for April Fool's Day but we're still doing a notorious bad movie from a respected director,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Visual Index: Best Shots from Ghostbusters (1984)

With the new riff on the ol' Ghostbusters property nearly upon us, what better time to look back at the original comedy smash? While the film's comic tone and dialogue are well remembered its visuals are less often discussed. The film was shot by the Hungarian cinematographer László Kovács. He logged a lot of quality time in the romantic comedy genre (What's Up Doc?, My Best Friend's Wedding, Say Anything...) but made his name in the 70s on scrappy, famous and/or ambitious pictures like Five Easy Pieces, Shampoo, New York New York, and Paper Moon.

Without further ado, let's see what the Hit Me With Your Best Shot club thought of the look of this picture and what slimy memories this revisit stirred up...

Ghostbusters

Directed by Ivan Reitman. Cinematography by László Kovács.

Starring: (in order of billing) Bill Murray, Dan Ackroyd, Sigourney Weaver,

Harold Ramis, Rick Moranis, Annie Potts,
See full article at FilmExperience »

From the Terrace

This is as sexy as Hollywood pix got in 1960. John O'Hara's novel about class snobbery and the drive for success posits Paul Newman as a moody go-getter. In glossy soap opera fashion, his silver spoon-fed bride Joanne Woodward morphs into an unfaithful monster. Some adulterous relationships are excused and others not in this glossy, morally rigged melodrama. In other words, it's prime entertainment material. From the Terrace Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1960 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 144 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Myrna Loy, Ina Balin, Leon Ames, Elizabeth Allen, Barbara Eden, George Grizzard, Patrick O'Neal, Felix Aylmer. Cinematography Leo Tover Art Direction Maurice Ransford, Howard Richmond, Lyle R. Wheeler Film Editor Dorothy Spencer Original Music Elmer Bernstein Written by Ernest Lehman from the novel by John O'Hara Produced and directed by Mark Robson

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

1960 saw the release of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hitler’s Madman

Douglas Sirk's first American movie came out so well that Prc sold it to MGM, earning Sirk a promotion out of the Poverty Row studios. John Carradine is excellent - and underplays! -- as the Hangman of Prague who moonlights as a depraved sex criminal. But the context in this wartime propaganda movie is serious -- it commemorates the Nazi murder of an entire Czech town. Hitler's Madman DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1943 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 84 min. / Street Date December 1, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 18.95 Starring Patricia Morrison, John Carradine, Alan Curtis, Howard Freeman, Ralph Morgan, Ludwig Stössel, Edgar Kennedy, Al Shean, Elizabeth Russell, Jimmy Conlin, Ava Gardner, Natalie Draper, Victor Kilian, Otto Reichow, Peter van Eyck, Hans Heinrich von Twardowski, Blanch Yurka. Cinematography (Eugen Schüfftan, credited as Technical Advisor), Jack Greenhalgh Film Editor Dan Milner Second unit and uncredited production designer Edgar G. Ulmer Original Music
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Imitation of Life,’ ‘Being There,’ ‘Ghostbusters,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2004, they’ve now reached 675 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2015 list, which includes classics such as Douglas Sirk‘s melodrama Imitation of Life, Hal Ashby‘s Being There, and John Frankenheimer‘s Seconds. Perhaps the most popular picks, The Shawshank Redemption, Ghostbusters, Top Gun, and L.A. Confidential were also added. Check out the full list below.

Being There (1979)

Chance, a simple-minded gardener (Peter Sellers) whose only contact with the outside world is through television, becomes the toast of the town following a series of misunderstandings. Forced outside his protected environment by the death of his wealthy boss, Chance subsumes his late employer’s persona,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections

‘Ghostbusters,’ ‘Top Gun,’ ‘L.A. Confidential’ Among 2015 National Film Registry Selections
Ghostbusters,” “Top Gun,” “L.A. Confidential” and “Being There” are among the Library of Congress’ 2015 selections for the National Film Registry.

Each year, the Library of Congress adds 25 notable films to its permanent collection, ensuring that the titles will be preserved for generations to come. The 2015 class is typically eclectic, ranging from silent films to 1980s blockbusters, edgy indies to educational films such as the Disney-produced 1946 entry “The Story of Menstruation.”

“Selecting a film for the National Film Registry recognizes its importance to cinema and America’s cultural and artistic history,” said acting Librarian of Congress David Mao. “The registry is an invaluable way to advance public awareness of the richness, creativity and variety of our nation’s film heritage.”

The 2015 selections bring the number of titles in the registry to 675. The films are selected by Library of Congress staffers and the National Film Preservation Board, after reviewing nominations made
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Forgotten: Douglas Sirk's "A Scandal in Paris" (1946)

  • MUBI
Imitations of Life: The Films of Douglas Sirk (December 23 – January 6) at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York gathers a substantial number of the German auteur's classic films together with more obscure titles, some of which may deserve elevation into the higher ranks of his oeuvre. Already, in the past few years, There's Always Tomorrow (1956) has crept up the league table of Sirkian melodrama, mainly because it became easier to see and people recognized that it could stand comparison with All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Imitation of Life (1959), or nearly so.Some Sirk movies will, however, never be quite respectable, but in a way I love them for that. His period movies often dive headlong into Hollywood kitsch in a way that his once-despised weepies mainly avoid. There's a trio of movies playing with George Sanders which exemplify this in their different ways. Summer Storm (1944) was Hollywood's
See full article at MUBI »

The Forgotten: Douglas Sirk's "A Scandal in Paris" (1946)

  • MUBI
Imitations of Life: The Films of Douglas Sirk (December 23 – January 6) at the Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York gathers a substantial number of the German auteur's classic films together with more obscure titles, some of which may deserve elevation into the higher ranks of his oeuvre. Already, in the past few years, There's Always Tomorrow (1956) has crept up the league table of Sirkian melodrama, mainly because it became easier to see and people recognized that it could stand comparison with All That Heaven Allows (1955) and Imitation of Life (1959), or nearly so.Some Sirk movies will, however, never be quite respectable, but in a way I love them for that. His period movies often dive headlong into Hollywood kitsch in a way that his once-despised weepies mainly avoid. There's a trio of movies playing with George Sanders which exemplify this in their different ways. Summer Storm (1944) was Hollywood's
See full article at MUBI »

Rock Hudson’s Courage Paved the Way for Stars Suffering with HIV

Rock Hudson’s Courage Paved the Way for Stars Suffering with HIV
When Rock Hudson, who would have been 90 Tuesday, acknowledged in 1985 that he was suffering from AIDS, his publicist Dale Olson told the press that “it has been his desire that if he can do anything at all to help the rest of humanity by acknowledging that he has this disease, he will be happy to do that.”

He did. His confirmation, following a report by Variety‘s Army Archerd, helped elevate the urgency of the epidemic, even if it didn’t immediately end some of the hysteria and stigma surrounding AIDS. What it did do is usher in a greater focus on fundraising for AIDS charities and government funding for research.

And on Tuesday, right on Hudson’s would-be birthday, Charlie Sheen revealed in an interview with “Today” that he is HIV positive.

People magazine said in August 1985: “Until now, even in Hollywood, apathy about AIDS has proven surprisingly widespread.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch: Exclusive 'My Magnificent Obsession' Trailer Chronicles Terrifying Feats of Powerlifting Legend Ct Fletcher

  • Indiewire
Read More: Stranger Than Fiction: 16 Documentaries That Will Blow Your Mind A trailer for Vlad Yudin's new documentary, "Ct Fletcher: My Magnificent Obsession," gives a preview of the life of powerlifter Ct Fletcher and his journey from a difficult upbringing and personal struggles to success as a renowned bodybuilder and motivational speaker. Fletcher is known for his wickedly intense fitness regimen, something he had always wanted to bring to a gym he dreamed of opening. Yudin's documentary will chronicle Fletcher's unorthodox training methods, and how his extreme methods often contradicted many mainstream ones in the powerlifting world. The film will premiere on VOD through Vimeo Video On Demand, debuting during Las Vegas' Mr. Olympia weekend. Of the film, Vlad Yudin said, "I'm very excited to unveil Ct Fletcher's film to the world. His on screen presence is captivating; his story is intense and will grab your attention from the very.
See full article at Indiewire »

Daily | Louis Jourdan, Lizabeth Scott, Stewart Stern

"Louis Jourdan, a handsome, sad-eyed French actor who worked steadily in films and on television in Europe and the United States for better than five decades, as a romantic hero in movies like Gigi and later as a suave villain in movies like Octopussy, died on Friday at his home in Beverly Hills," reports Terrence Rafferty in the New York Times. We also remember Lizabeth Scott, star of films noir in the 1940s and 1950s; screenwriter Stewart Stern (Rebel Without a Cause, Rachel, Rachel and Sybil); media journalist David Carr; actor Bryant Crenshaw (Gummo); and writer and producer Robert Blees (Magnificent Obsession). » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Robert Blees, Writer of Sirk’s ‘Magnificent Obsession,’ Dies at 96

Robert Blees, a writer and producer for film and television who penned the screenplays for Douglas Sirk’s 1954 classic “Magnificent Obsession” and Joan Crawford film “Autumn Leaves,” died January 31 in Menlo Park, Calif. He was 96.

Over the course of a show business career lasting more than four decades, Blees amassed a considerable number of credits in television, from “Damon Runyon Theater,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Peter Gunn,” “Zane Grey Theater” and “Kraft Suspense Theater” to the 1985 TV movie “Gidget’s Summer Reunion.” He was a producer of series including “Combat,” “Bonanza” and “Cannon.”

Blees also served for decades on the board of the Motion Picture & Television Fund.

“While my tenure on Mptf’s board overlapped Bob Blees’ for only a few years, it didn’t take long to appreciate his grace and intellect as well as his compassion for the people of our industry,” said Mptf CEO Bob Beitcher. “Bob served
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Robert Blees, Writer of Sirk’s ‘Magnificent Obsession,’ Dies at 96

Robert Blees, a writer and producer for film and television who penned the screenplays for Douglas Sirk’s 1954 classic “Magnificent Obsession” and Joan Crawford film “Autumn Leaves,” died January 31 in Menlo Park, Calif. He was 96.

Over the course of a show business career lasting more than four decades, Blees amassed a considerable number of credits in television, from “Damon Runyon Theater,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Peter Gunn,” “Zane Grey Theater” and “Kraft Suspense Theater” to the 1985 TV movie “Gidget’s Summer Reunion.” He was a producer of series including “Combat,” “Bonanza” and “Cannon.”

Blees also served for decades on the board of the Motion Picture & Television Fund.

“While my tenure on Mptf’s board overlapped Bob Blees’ for only a few years, it didn’t take long to appreciate his grace and intellect as well as his compassion for the people of our industry,” said Mptf CEO Bob Beitcher. “Bob served
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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