4.9/10
93
11 user 1 critic

Jesse James' Women (1954)

Passed | | Western | 4 September 1954 (USA)
Jesse James keeps so busy skirt-chasing that his outlaw career starts to suffer.

Director:

(as Donald Barry)

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Jesse James / J. Woodsen (as Don Barry)
...
Waco Gans
...
Frank James
...
Delta
Joyce Barrett ...
Caprice Clark (as Joyce Rhed)
Betty Brueck ...
Cattle Kate Kennedy
Laura Lea ...
Angel Botts
Sam Keller ...
Cole Younger
T.V. Garraway ...
Preacher (as Tom Garraway)
...
Bob Ford (as Mike Carr)
Alton Hillman ...
Champ O'Toole
Curtis Dossett ...
Banker Clark (as Curtiss Dossett)
Jimmie Hammons ...
Sheriff Clem Botts
Mac McAllister ...
Ace - O'Toole's Manager
Frank Cunningham ...
Pete
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Storyline

Jesse James leaves Missouri for Mississippi, and immediately charms all the women in Mississippi out of their bloomers and garters. His first conquest is the banker's daughter who helps him loot the bank in exchange for a promise of marriage; he wanders over to the saloon and runs the crooked partner of the proprietress out of town, takes all of his-and-her money and leaves her, between kisses, hounding him for her share; the third one, the saloon singer, actually makes a mark out of him as she cons him into a boxing match against a professional fighter and he loses the fight and his money, but he holds the singer and the fighter up as they leave town and gets his money back; and then he romances and swindles Cattle Kate, a replay of what he had done somewhere before to Kate and the "gotcha-again" Kate even ends up behind bars. But no film that contains a cat-fight between Peggie Castle and Lita Baron can be called a complete waste of time. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Battle of the Sexes and the Sixes Rages across the Lusty West! Women WANTED him... more than the Law! See more »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 September 1954 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le amanti di Jesse il bandito  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.75 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Referenced in Contempt (1963) See more »

Soundtracks

In the Shadows of My Heart
Written by Stan Jones
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User Reviews

 
Low-budget doesn't always mean bad, but in this case it most certainly does
17 May 2017 | by See all my reviews

Donald Barry stars in, co-wrote, co-produced, directed and probably did the catering, landscaping and janitorial work on this cheesy, badly shot, ineptly written, amateurishly acted and poorly made low-budget-- VERY low-budget--western purporting to be about infamous western outlaw Jesse James. If you're going to make a movie about a real person, it would probably help if you stuck at least a few actual facts in it, and that's what you get in this stinker--few actual facts. Other than showing that Jesse had a brother Frank and that he and fellow outlaw Bob Ford didn't get along, there isn't much about this movie that has any basis in fact. The short and paunchy Barry wrote Jesse as being completely irresistible to women--and makes sure that his henchmen mention that fact every so often--and plays him like a Vegas lounge-lizard in the vein of Wayne Newton (but even smarmier) who has scads of beautiful women just throwing themselves at him. To give Barry credit he did pick some absolutely gorgeous women like Peggie Castle, Lita Baron and Joyce Barrett to fight over him, but whatever efforts they try to make at giving this film some kind of professional touch are ruined by the juvenile and pedestrian script and Barry's completely botched attempt at directing. He smirks his way through the picture and doesn't really have much chemistry with his cast, most of whom are amateurs whose "performances" consist of haltingly reciting their lines and trying to stay on their marks (a few of them even have trouble trying to stay on their horses). The whole project reeks of someone getting a little money together and telling his friends, "Let's make a movie!". Castle and Betty Brueck have a rather long catfight in a saloon, which is actually done fairly well, and there's a sequence with Barry engaged in a boxing match with a traveling prizefighter that is handled tongue-in-cheek and is mildly amusing, but other than those small pluses Barry, Castle (who is far and away the best thing about this picture) and Baron have done far better work, and I wouldn't doubt that at least those two women didn't bring up this picture in any discussion of their careers, as well they shouldn't have.


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