It Should Happen to You (1954) - News Poster

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Biopic About Oscar-Winning Actress Who Fought Sexual Harassment in the Works

Judy Holliday in “It Should Happen to You

With stories about workplace harassers breaking every day, it’s important to remember the women who helped pave the way to this current moment by standing up to sexist, entitled bullies. Oscar-winning actress Judy Holliday is one of them. And, according to The Hollywood Reporter, a biopic about Holliday and the abuse she withstood from mega-producer Darryl F. Zanuck (“All About Eve”) is in the works. The film is entitled “Smart Blonde,” a reference to Holliday’s Iq of 172.

According to the project’s screenwriter Willy Holtzman, Holliday refused Zanuck’s “aggressive sexual overtures” when she was 22. “Her agent scheduled her for the notorious ‘4 o’clock meeting’ and ordered her to stuff her bra,” Holtzman said. When they met, Zanuck locked the door, unzipped his pants, and forced Holliday on the couch. “He said, ‘You belong to me.’ Judy reached into her blouse,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Second-Hand Illusion: Notes on Cukor

  • MUBI
The following is an essay featured in the anthology George Cukor - On/Off Hollywood (Capricci, Paris, 2013), for sale at www.capricci.fr.

The Film Society of Lincoln Center will be running a complete retrospective on the director, "The Discreet Charm of George Cukor," in New York December 13, 2013 - January 7, 2014. Many thanks to David Phelps, Fernando Ganzo, and Camille Pollas for their generous permission.

The Second-hand Illusion:

Notes on Cukor

Above: The Chapman Report (1962), A Life of Her Own (1950)

“There’s always something about them that you don’t know that you’d like to know. Spencer Tracy had that. In fact, they do all have that – all the big ones have it. You feel very close to them but there is the ultimate thing withheld from you – and you want to find out.” —George Cukor1

“Can you tell what a woman’s like by just looking at her?” —The Chapman Report
See full article at MUBI »

Locarno 2013. Mubi Coverage Roundup

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Below you will find an index for all of our 66th Locarno Film Festival coverage by Adam Cook, Marie-Pierre Duhamel, and Celluloid Liberation Front.

Films

What Now? Remind Me by Joaquim Pinto (x two)

When Evening Falls on Bucharest or Metabolism by Corneliu Poromboiu

Short Term 12 by Destin Cretton

Manakamana by Stephanie Spray & Pacho Velez

Une autre vie by Emmanuel Mouret

Les grandes ondes (à l'ouest) by Lionel Baier

A Masque of Madness (Notes on Film 06-b, Monologue 02) by Norbert Pfaffenbilcher

On Death Row II by Werner Herzog

It Should Happen to You by George Cukor

Interviews

Abel Ferrara

Ben Rivers & Ben Russell
See full article at MUBI »

Locarno 2013. True or False: George Cukor's "It Should Happen To You"

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“A kind of banalization of celebrity has occurred: we are now offered an instant, ready-to-mix fame as nutritious as packet soup. In the post-Warhol era a single gesture such as uncrossing one's legs has more significance than all the pages in War and Peace.”

- Jg Ballard

The darker side of fame and the sinister aftertaste of success are recurring features in many of Cukor’s films, from What Price Hollywood? (1932) to Rich and Famous (1981); the American director often hinted at the anguishing emptiness lurking behind stardom. In It Should Happen to You (1954) Cukor pushes even further with his reflections on the elusive matter of celebrity and the role that mono-dimensional images play in projecting the illusion of limelight. Gladys Glover (Judy Holliday), an aspiring bigwig of nondescript qualities, meets Pete Sheppard (Jack Lemmon) in Central Park, where he is busy capturing “real things and real people” with his hand-held
See full article at MUBI »

Top Ten 1950s

This will be the last top ten off the top of my head whole decade thingies for a bit -- we need to get to real articles but I've been swamped off blog. But these discussions are fun, don't you agree? The 1950s were the first film decade I was obsessed with in that when I was first becoming interested in cinema in the mid 80s, the 50s somehow came to signify Mythic Classic Hollywood to me, though cinema obviously stretched much much further back. So I guess I'll always be kind of attached to this decade when the movies got literally bigger (I do so prefer rectangulars to squares) and the era's stars really defined (at least for me) the concept of "Movie Star". I mean it's hard to argue with Liz, Brando, Clift, Dean, Monroe in all caps.

Which is why Giant is such a perfect 1950s movie
See full article at FilmExperience »

It Should Happen to You

With the meaning of celebrity becoming ever more ambiguous, and Andy Warhol’s notorious prediction coming true that eventually everybody will be famous for fifteen minutes, the touching and delightful 1954 George Cukor-Garson Kanin-Judy Holliday-Jack Lemmon satirical New York comedy about fame, It Should Happen to You (available on DVD), seems now not only still most relevant but also downright prescient. Kanin, who wrote the original screenplay, initially called the picture (far more appropriately) A Name for Herself, but the studio thought it could do better and didn’t. (Columbia was the studio, which had become a major because of It Happened…
See full article at Blogdanovich »

It Should Happen to You

With the meaning of celebrity becoming ever more ambiguous, and Andy Warhol’s notorious prediction coming true that eventually everybody will be famous for fifteen minutes, the touching and delightful 1954 George Cukor-Garson Kanin-Judy Holliday-Jack Lemmon satirical New York comedy about fame, It Should Happen to You (available on DVD), seems now not only still most relevant but also downright prescient. Kanin, who wrote the original screenplay, initially called the picture (far more appropriately) A Name for Herself, but the studio thought it could do better and didn’t. (Columbia was the studio, which had become a major because of It Happened One Night, so maybe they figured there was magic in the words “it” and “happen”; they would later make It Happened to Jane.) Jack Lemmon, whose beguiling debut in pictures this was, always blamed the movie’s lackluster box office on its meaninglessly general title.
See full article at Blogdanovich »

Pitch of the Day: 'The Emperor's New iClothes'

Pitch of the Day: 'The Emperor's New iClothes'
Last year, The Onion published an article satirizing Apple with fake news about an iPhone that can only be seen by the company's most loyal customers. It should have been reprinted this week in honor of the latest Apple pep rally held in San Franciso today. Before the event began, millions of people were not only curious, but already desired the rumored-to-be-unveiled iSlate or Apple Tablet or whatever it's actually called (yes, I've heard all the jokes), despite the fact that nobody really knew what it was (see Engadget's excellent rumor timeline). This madness has inspired today's pitch idea. Mainly due to the photographs in the Onion story, I'm obviously reminded of a little Hans Christian Anderson tale, the name of which would be altered slightly to ...

The Emperor's New iClothes

The satirical comedy (which probably couldn't legally get away with the "i" in the title) would be an adaptation
See full article at Cinematical »

See also

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