IMDb > Human Desire (1954)
Human Desire
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Human Desire (1954) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 16 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.2/10   2,155 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 15% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)
Émile Zola (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Human Desire on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 August 1954 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A rarity on the screen... a RAW slice of life! See more »
Plot:
A Korean War vet returns to his job as a railroad engineer and becomes involved in a sordid affair with a co-worker's wife and murder. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(16 articles)
Movie Poster of the Week: Nicholas Ray’s “In a Lonely Place”
 (From MUBI. 8 December 2012, 8:33 AM, PST)

Clip joint: Taking the train
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 15 August 2012, 9:49 AM, PDT)

Daily Briefing. Movie: A Journal of Film Criticism 3
 (From MUBI. 24 December 2011, 4:24 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
Slightly disappointing See more (38 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Glenn Ford ... Jeff Warren

Gloria Grahame ... Vicki Buckley

Broderick Crawford ... Carl Buckley

Edgar Buchanan ... Alec Simmons
Kathleen Case ... Ellen Simmons
Peggy Maley ... Jean
Diane DeLaire ... Vera Simmons
Grandon Rhodes ... John Owens
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Paul Brinegar ... Brakeman (uncredited)
Victor Hugo Greene ... Davidson (uncredited)
Don C. Harvey ... Yard Dispatcher (uncredited)
Carl Lee ... John Thurston (uncredited)
John Maxwell ... Chief of Police (uncredited)
John Pickard ... Matt Henley (uncredited)
Dan Riss ... Prosecutor Gruber (uncredited)
Dan Seymour ... Duggan - Bartender (uncredited)
Olan Soule ... Lewis (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Gruber's Assistant at Inquest (uncredited)
John Zaremba ... 'Russ' Russell, Train Conductor (uncredited)

Directed by
Fritz Lang 
 
Writing credits
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)

Émile Zola (novel "La Bête Humaine") (as Emile Zola)

Produced by
Lewis J. Rachmil .... producer
 
Original Music by
Daniele Amfitheatrof 
 
Cinematography by
Burnett Guffey (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Aaron Stell 
 
Art Direction by
Robert Peterson 
 
Set Decoration by
William Kiernan 
 
Costume Design by
Jean Louis (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
Clay Campbell .... makeup artist
Helen Hunt .... hair stylist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Milton Feldman .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
John P. Livadary .... recording supervisor (as John Livadary)
 
Music Department
Morris Stoloff .... conductor
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Spain:13 | Sweden:15 | UK:PG (2010) | UK:X (1954) | USA:Approved (PCA #16878, Adult Audience) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Upon his return from Japan after the Korean War, veteran Glenn Ford brings Kathleen Case a kimono and jokingly refers to "The Teashouse of the Rising Moon," a clear reference to the then-current Broadway hit "The Teahouse of the August Moon" (1953-1956). Ironically Ford would star in the 1956 screen version two years later.See more »
Goofs:
Errors in geography: The closing sequence shows the famous "Trenton Makes, The World Takes" bridge over the Delaware River and the NJ State Capitol out the side window of the locomotive over Jeff Warren's shoulder, meaning the train is headed south on the four-track Pennsylvania Railroad Northeast Corridor. The scene cuts to the front window and the train is on a single-line track in farmland passing a track gang. After Glen waves to the workers, the scene cuts back to a forward view of a three-track railroad passing an opposing steam train that was not visible in the previous shot.See more »
Quotes:
[First lines]
John Thurston:Good to see you back, Jeff.
Jeff Warren:Town looks great
John Thurston:80% better than Korea, I'll bet.
Jeff Warren:100%.
John Thurston:No medals?
Jeff Warren:They ran out of them.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Girl on the Late, Late Show (1974) (TV)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
20 out of 29 people found the following review useful.
Slightly disappointing, 17 September 2004
Author: guy-bellinger (guy.bellinger@wanadoo.fr) from Montigny-lès-Metz, France

Despite Lang's signature, I must admit I have been a bit let down. I say "a bit" because "Human Desire" is not a bad film in itself. Simply, it somewhat pales beside its admirable model, Jean Renoir's "La Bête humaine".

Here are a few shortcomings ( which will appear so only if we have seen the two versions ) : -To begin with, why this happy end, at least concerning Warren ( Lantier's American counterpart) ? It is downright unfaithful both to Zola's naturalism and Renoir's "poetic determinism". - More in keeping with the source material it was a commendable idea to make Warren a Korea War veteran ( war CAN unsettle individuals) but the character basically remains an all-American good guy erring a little.And if to err is "human" then it doesn't at all make the character a "human beast". - Glenn Ford's interpretation is undistiguished compared to Jean Gabin's formidable presence in the former film. - Something equally amazing is choosing usually picturesque Edgar Buchanan to replace Carette and give him nothing to do ! No one can forget Carette's gift of the gab and drawling accent hiding a deep feeling of helpless sympathy. Whoever will remember Edgar Buchanan in this dull part ? [ sigh of helpless sympathy ! ]

There are good points, however, in this film, notably the convincing portrayal of the "cursed couple" by always reliable Gloria Grahame and Broderick Crawford as well as the opening sequences of tracks,switches, metallic bridges... with no other sounds than the clanking of wheels ,conjuring up ( this time like in Renoir's "Human Beast" )the inexorable progress of fate.

On the whole I didn't really dislike "Human Desire" but I found it less atmospheric, more matter of fact than the original. In other words, I wish I hadn't seen "La Bête humaine"...yet.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (38 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Human Desire (1954)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Renoir's La Bte Humaine- similarities. philistine-985-817685
Gloria Grahame Agnelin
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Last Seduction Ossessione Notes on a Scandal Strangers on a Train Greed
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.