IMDb > Human Desire (1954)
Human Desire
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Human Desire (1954) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
7.2/10   2,078 votes »
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MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 78% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)
Émile Zola (novel)
Contact:
View company contact information for Human Desire on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 August 1954 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A rarity on the screen... a RAW slice of life! See more »
Plot:
A Korean War vet returns to his job as a railroad engineer and becomes involved in a sordid affair with a co-worker's wife and murder. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(16 articles)
Movie Poster of the Week: Nicholas Ray’s “In a Lonely Place”
 (From MUBI. 8 December 2012, 8:33 AM, PST)

Clip joint: Taking the train
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 15 August 2012, 9:49 AM, PDT)

Daily Briefing. Movie: A Journal of Film Criticism 3
 (From MUBI. 24 December 2011, 4:24 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
Lang's gloomy remake of Renoir's "La bete humaine" See more (35 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Glenn Ford ... Jeff Warren

Gloria Grahame ... Vicki Buckley

Broderick Crawford ... Carl Buckley

Edgar Buchanan ... Alec Simmons
Kathleen Case ... Ellen Simmons
Peggy Maley ... Jean
Diane DeLaire ... Vera Simmons
Grandon Rhodes ... John Owens
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Paul Brinegar ... Brakeman (uncredited)
Victor Hugo Greene ... Davidson (uncredited)
Don C. Harvey ... Yard Dispatcher (uncredited)
Carl Lee ... John Thurston (uncredited)
John Maxwell ... Chief of Police (uncredited)
John Pickard ... Matt Henley (uncredited)
Dan Riss ... Prosecutor Gruber (uncredited)
Dan Seymour ... Duggan - Bartender (uncredited)
Olan Soule ... Lewis (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Gruber's Assistant at Inquest (uncredited)
John Zaremba ... 'Russ' Russell, Train Conductor (uncredited)
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Directed by
Fritz Lang 
 
Writing credits
Alfred Hayes (screenplay)

Émile Zola (novel "La Bête Humaine") (as Emile Zola)

Produced by
Lewis J. Rachmil .... producer
 
Original Music by
Daniele Amfitheatrof 
 
Cinematography by
Burnett Guffey (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Aaron Stell 
 
Art Direction by
Robert Peterson 
 
Set Decoration by
William Kiernan 
 
Costume Design by
Jean Louis (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
Clay Campbell .... makeup artist
Helen Hunt .... hair stylist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Milton Feldman .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
John P. Livadary .... recording supervisor (as John Livadary)
 
Music Department
Morris Stoloff .... conductor
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Spain:13 | Sweden:15 | UK:PG (2010) | UK:X (1954) | USA:Approved (PCA #16878, Adult Audience) | West Germany:16 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The "Central National" Railroad was portrayed by equipment and properties of the Southern Pacific Railroad. The locomotive and yard scenes were filled on the Rock Island Railroad in El Reno, Oklahoma. RI Alco FA-1 #153 had the lettering covered on the side and a red panel added over the low nose herald. The "Yard Office" is actually the building housing the offices for the car repair facility in El Reno. The view after that is in the car repair shed north of the diesel shop in El Reno. The north side of the diesel shop is in the background. No. 717 that almost runs them over is RI Alco S-2 that was assigned to El Reno at least through the mid-60s.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the opening scene, the train as seen from a high shot, is being pulled by a Baltimore and Ohio locomotive manufactured by Electro Motive. The locomotive Jeff Warren climbs down from is an ALCO manufactured locomotive lettered for Central National Railroad. While such a change of locomotives was certainly possible, the same engineer would never be operating it for two different railroads.See more »
Quotes:
[First lines]
John Thurston:Good to see you back, Jeff.
Jeff Warren:Town looks great
John Thurston:80% better than Korea, I'll bet.
Jeff Warren:100%.
John Thurston:No medals?
Jeff Warren:They ran out of them.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The Girl on the Late, Late Show (1974) (TV)See more »

FAQ

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30 out of 36 people found the following review useful.
Lang's gloomy remake of Renoir's "La bete humaine", 4 May 2003
Author: Kalaman from Ottawa

"Human Desire" is NOT one of Fritz Lang's masterpieces. Though it has its moments, it ultimately comes off as a second-rate work. A remake of Jean Renoir's 1938 "La bete Humaine" starring Jean Gabin, "Human Desire" is less successful than Renoir's adaptation of the Zola novel, but when all things considered, it is not bad, and is filled with some interesting geometric images & visuals. The film turns out to be gloomy, often bleak melodrama that has a striking affinity with Billy Wilder's "Double Indemnity" in its plot, dealing with a married woman (Gloria Grahame) trying to get rid of her bland husband (Broderick Crawford) through the help of a train engineer (Glenn Ford). If you stop concentrating on the melodramatic plot and focus on Lang's lovely architectural compositions, "Human Desire" becomes quite engrossing picture, on par with "The Big Heat", Lang's previous film noir with Grahame & Ford. From the first image to the last, the scenes of railroad tracks are masterfully handled: we see a series of precise lines and converging tracks moving forward. Moreover, Grahame and Crawford's rooms in their working class house are characterized by a series of squares, boxes, rectangles to conjure up a nightmarish vision of fate and destiny.

Also, it is worth noting that in the same house we see the appearance of television for the first time in Lang's films. Lang will later explore the dangers of media manipulation in his last two American films: "While the City Sleeps" and "Beyond a Reasonable Doubt".

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Renoir's La Bte Humaine- similarities. philistine-985-817685
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