Executive Suite (1954) - News Poster

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On this day: Annie Hall, Hot Fuzz, Jessica Lange

On this day (April 20th) in history as it relates to showbiz...

1893 Harold Lloyd, silent comedian of excellence, born in Nebraska

1889 Adolf Hitler born. The German Führer has been played in movies by literally hundreds of actors including in recent years Robert Carlyle, Udo Keir, Noah Taylor, and Bruno Ganz. On this awful subject let's consider it a shame that Jodie Foster never made that rumored Leni Reifenstahl (Triumph of the Will) biopic she was interested in doing. That would have made an interesting less covered piece of the ever-harrowing Nazi puzzle.

⇱ 1924 Oscar nominated actress Nina Foch (Executive Suite, An American in Paris, Spartacus) is born in The Netherlands. She was awesome.

1937 Modern gay hero George Takei born in Los Angeles. Becomes famous as Lt. Sulu in the Star Trek TV series in the 60s.
See full article at FilmExperience »

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

Broadway’s delightful — but wickedly accurate — satire of big business was brought to movie screens almost intact, with the story, the stars, the styles and dances kept as they were in the long-running show that won a Pulitzer Prize. This is the place to see Robert Morse and Michele Lee at their best — it’s one of the best, and least appreciated movie musicals of the 1960s.

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 121 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Robert Morse, Michele Lee, Rudy Vallee, Anthony Teague, Maureen Arthur, Sammy Smith, Robert Q. Lewis, Carol Worthington, Kathryn Reynolds, Ruth Kobart, George Fennemann, Tucker Smith, David Swift.

Cinematography: Burnett Guffey

Film Editor: Allan Jacobs, Ralph E. Winters

Original Music: Nelson Riddle

Art Direction: Robert Boyle

Visual Gags: Virgil Partch

From the play written by Frank Loesser, Abe Burrows,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

One of the Greatest Film Noir Stars of Them All? Four Crime Classics to Remember

Dana Andrews movies: Film noir actor excelled in both major and minor crime dramas. Dana Andrews movies: First-rate film noir actor excelled in both classics & minor fare One of the best-looking and most underrated actors of the studio era, Dana Andrews was a first-rate film noir/crime thriller star. Oftentimes dismissed as no more than a “dependable” or “reliable” leading man, in truth Andrews brought to life complex characters that never quite fit into the mold of Hollywood's standardized heroes – or rather, antiheroes. Unlike the cynical, tough-talking, and (albeit at times self-delusionally) self-confident characters played by the likes of Alan Ladd, Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and, however lazily, Robert Mitchum, Andrews created portrayals of tortured men at odds with their social standing, their sense of ethics, and even their romantic yearnings. Not infrequently, there was only a very fine line separating his (anti)heroes from most movie villains.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Producer Jud Kinberg, Father of Simon Kinberg, Dies at 91

Producer Jud Kinberg, Father of Simon Kinberg, Dies at 91
Jud Kinberg, father of Simon Kinberg and a producer of “Lust for Life” and “The Collector,” died on Nov. 2 at his home in New York City, according to a rep for his son. He was 91.

Kinberg was a Brooklyn native who attended the University of North Carolina. He served with the U.S Army in World War II and was awarded a Purple Heart and a Silver Star.

Kinberg began working in Hollywood under John Houseman, collaborating with him on films for MGM including “Julius Caesar,” starring Marlon Brando; “Executive Suite,” starring William Holden; “Her Twelve Men,” with Greer Garson and Robert Ryan; Vincente Minnelli’s “The Cobweb,” with Richard Widmark and Lauren Bacall; and “Lust for Life,” starring Kirk Douglas as Vincent Van Gogh.

Kinberg also produced the British psychological thriller “The Collector,” directed by William Wyler, and “The Magus,” starring Michael Caine.

Kinberg also worked for ABC, Embassy,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jud Kinberg, ‘Lust for Life’ and ‘Executive Suite’ Producer, Dies at 91

  • The Wrap
Jud Kinberg, the father of “X-Men” co-writer/producer and “Deadpool” producer Simon Kinberg, has died. He was 91. Jud Kinberg was best known for his own producing work on the 1956 Vincent van Gogh biopic “Lust for Life” starring Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn, and “Executive Suite” in 1954. In 1978, he was nominated for an Emmy for producing “Quincy M.E.,” the NBC drama starring Jack Klugman as a coroner who investigates suspicious deaths. Kinberg Sr. died Nov. 2 of natural causes at his home in New York City, his son told The Hollywood Reporter.
See full article at The Wrap »

Strategic Air Command

The biggest, most lavish hook-up between Hollywood and the Pentagon was this Anthony Mann-James Stewart collaboration, a morale & recruiting cheer for America's intercontinental bombing air force, the service that kept the peace by holding up our side of the balance of fear. Strategic Air Command Blu-ray Olive Films 1955 / Color / 1:66 widescreen (VistaVision) / 112 min. / Street Date October 16, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 Starring James Stewart, June Allyson, Frank Lovejoy, Barry Sullivan, Alex Nicol, Bruce Bennett, Jay C. Flippen, James Millican, James Bell, Rosemary DeCamp, Harry Morgan, William Hudson, Strother Martin, House Peters Jr. Cinematography William Daniels Film Editor Eda Warren Original Music Victor Young Written by Valentine Davies, Beirne Lay, Jr. Produced by Samuel J. Briskin Directed by Anthony Mann

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

In the 1950s America was spending its enormous military budget on a fantastic array of advanced weapons technology, the most expensive of which was
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Rod Serling’s ‘Patterns’

Is this Rod Serling's best teleplay ever? Van Heflin, Everett Sloane and Ed Begley are at the center of a business power squeeze. Is it all about staying competitive, or is it corporate murder? With terrific early performances from Elizabeth Wilson and Beatrice Straight. Patterns Blu-ray The Film Detective 1956 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 14.99 Starring Van Heflin, Everett Sloane, Ed Begley, Beatrice Straight, Elizabeth Wilson, Joanna Roos, Valerie Cossart, Eleni Kiamos, Ronnie Welsh, Shirley Standlee, Andrew Duggan, Jack Livesy, John Seymour, James Kelly, John Shelly, Victor Harrison, Sally Gracie, Sally Chamberlin, Edward Binns, Lauren Bacall, Ethel Britton, Michael Dreyfuss, Elaine Kaye, Adrienne Moore. Cinematography Boris Kaufman Film Editors Dave Kummis, Carl Lerner Art Direction Richard Sylbert Assistant Director Charles Maguire Written by Rod Serling Produced by Michael Myerberg Directed by Fielder Cook

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Let me roll off the titles of some 'fifties 'organization
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Spring Takes Time

Get yer terrific long-suppressed film history right here, folks -- this is what it takes to get your movie banned in East Germany in 1965: Günter Stahnke makes a drama revealing forbidden capitalist-style competitiveness and dastardly backstabbing in a state-run industry. Think any of those Party censors would object? Spring Takes Time DVD Defa Film Library 1965 / B&W / 1:37 flat / 76 min. / Der Frühling braucht Zeit / Street Date March 2016 / available through The Defa Film Library / 29.95 Starring Eberhard Mellies, Günther Simon, Doris Abesser, Karla Runkehl, Rolf Hoppe, Erik S. Klein, Friedrich Richter, Elfriede Née. Cinematography Lothar Erdmann, Eckhardt Hartkopf, Hans-Jürgen Sasse, Kurt Schütt Film Editor Erika Lehmphul Original Music Gerhard Siebholz; 'The Sputniks' Written by Hermann O. Lauterbach, Konrad Schwalbe, Günter Stahnke Produced by Defa Directed by Günter Stahnke

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

So you think artists over Here have it bad... Günter Stahnke experienced some late-career fame at the 1990 Berlinale film festival,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hollywood a ‘straight, white, boys' club’ says study

  • ScreenDaily
Hollywood a ‘straight, white, boys' club’ says study
A damning study released on Monday by the University Of Southern California has added fuel to the fire in the ongoing diversity furore, highlighting a paucity of opportunity for females, non-white ethnic groups and members of the Lgbt community.

Inclusion Or Invisibility?, a 27-page report by the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism’s Media, Diversity & Social Change Initiative, examined the status quo in front of and behind the camera in film, TV and digital platforms, and took the pulse of senior executives at 10 major companies.

The study analysed data from 2014 and found, among other things, that males accounted for 71.3% of all speaking roles in film, that only two directors from a pool of 407 were female and non-white, and that females over 40 were “largely invisible” in entertainment.

Furthermore an inclusivity scorecard of the six Us majors found that none passed the test, compared to more positive results by digital giants Amazon and Hulu.

The conclusion
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Report: Hollywood a ‘straight, white, boys' club’

  • ScreenDaily
Report: Hollywood a ‘straight, white, boys' club’
A damning study released on Monday by the University Of Southern California has added fuel to the fire in the ongoing diversity furore, highlighting a paucity of opportunity for females, non-white ethnic groups and members of the Lgbt community.

Inclusion Or Invisibility?, a 27-page report by the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism’s Media, Diversity & Social Change Initiative, examined the status quo in front of and behind the camera in film, TV and digital platforms, and took the pulse of senior executives at 10 major companies.

The study analysed data from 2014 and found, among other things, that males accounted for 71.3% of all speaking roles in film, that only two directors from a pool of 407 were female and non-white, and that females over 40 were “largely invisible” in entertainment.

Furthermore an inclusivity scorecard of the six Us majors found that none passed the test, compared to more positive results by digital giants Amazon and Hulu.

The conclusion
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The High Cost of Loving

José Ferrar stars in his second dramatic feature as director, teamed with newcomer Gena Rowlands as a married working couple. Ferrar's executive assistant isn't on the list of those invited to meet the new corporate bosses, which everyone knows means he's a dead employee walking. Things are looking darkest just as his loving wife is bringing news of a baby on the way. The show builds up a terrific critique of anxiety in the Rat Race, but then... The High Cost of Loving DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1958 / B&W / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 87 min. / Street Date July 16, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring José Ferrer, Gena Rowlands, Joanne Gilbert, Jim Backus, Bobby Troup, Philip Ober, Edward Platt, Charles Watts, Werner Klemperer, Malcolm Atterbury, Jeanne Baird, Nick Clooney, Abby Dalton, Richard Deacon, Nancy Kulp, Lucien Littlefield. Cinematography George J. Folsey Film Editor Ferris Webster Original Music Jeff Alexander Written by Rip Van Ronkel,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'Empire': Everything You Need to Know for Season 2

'Empire': Everything You Need to Know for Season 2
To say there's buzz around the return of Empire, Fox's ballsy King-Lear-meets-Mahogany hit that kicks off its sophomore season on September 23rd, is an understatement. (It's like observing that there's a few Gop hopefuls running for President.) All eyes are on the series to see if it can maintain the level of drama, glam and delightful camp that turned it into a ratings powerhouse and Twitter champ. The series hits every pleasure point for successful trashy TV: ludicrous plots, gleaming fashions, breakout performances, and a true gasp of it's own
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Smackdown Summer - Revamp Your Queues!

We're just 9 days away from the launch of another Smackdown Summer. Rather than announce piecemeal, we'll give you all five lineups in case you'd like more time to catch up with these films (some of them stone cold classics) over the hot months. Remember to cast your own ballots during each month for the reader-polling (your 1979 votes are due by June 4th). Your votes count toward the final Smackdown win so more of you should join in. 

These Oscar years were chosen after comment reading, dvd searching, handwringing, and desire-to-watch moods.  I wish we had time to squeeze in a dozen Smackdowns each summer! As it is there will be Two Smackdowns in June, a gift to you since this first episode was delayed.

Sunday June 7th

The Best Supporting Actresses of 1979

Meryl Streep won her first of three Oscars while taking her co-star Jane Alexander along for the Oscar ride in Kramer vs. Kramer.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Room Number: Where to Stay During the Tokyo Film Festival

Room Number: Where to Stay During the Tokyo Film Festival
In her column Room Number, travel expert Melissa Schwartz of Destination Happiness -- whose client roster ranges from Wme agent superstars to Wall Street titans -- reveals her favorite room in a different location on the entertainment industry travel circuit. The room of choice in Tokyo, where the Tokyo International Film Festival kicked off Thursday, is the very generous 800-square-foot Executive Suite Room 1708 in the Palace Hotel Tokyo (1-1-1 Marunouchi, Chiyoda). In a city where space itself is an extravagant luxury, this suite overlooks the regal gardens of the Imperial Palace, making it quite possibly like no

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Holden Has Two 'Wild' Movies Tonight

William Holden movies: ‘The Bridge on the River KwaiWilliam Holden is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" featured actor today, August 21, 2013. Throughout the day, TCM has been showing several William Holden movies made at Columbia, though his work at Paramount (e.g., I Wanted Wings, Dear Ruth, Streets of Laredo, Dear Wife) remains mostly off-limits. Right now, TCM is presenting David Lean’s 1957 Best Picture Academy Award winner and all-around blockbuster The Bridge on the River Kwai, the Anglo-American production that turned Lean into filmdom’s brainier Cecil B. DeMille. Until then a director of mostly small-scale dramas, Lean (quite literally) widened the scope of his movies with the widescreen-formatted Southeast Asian-set World War II drama, which clocks in at 161 minutes. Even though William Holden was The Bridge on the River Kwai‘s big box-office draw, the film actually belongs to Alec Guinness’ Pow British commander and to
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top Ten 1950s

This will be the last top ten off the top of my head whole decade thingies for a bit -- we need to get to real articles but I've been swamped off blog. But these discussions are fun, don't you agree? The 1950s were the first film decade I was obsessed with in that when I was first becoming interested in cinema in the mid 80s, the 50s somehow came to signify Mythic Classic Hollywood to me, though cinema obviously stretched much much further back. So I guess I'll always be kind of attached to this decade when the movies got literally bigger (I do so prefer rectangulars to squares) and the era's stars really defined (at least for me) the concept of "Movie Star". I mean it's hard to argue with Liz, Brando, Clift, Dean, Monroe in all caps.

Which is why Giant is such a perfect 1950s movie
See full article at FilmExperience »

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Jack Clayton, David Lean, Stanley Donen

Katharine Hepburn, Rossano Brazzi in Oscar nominee (but not DGA nominee) David Lean's Summertime DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1948-1952: Odd Men Out George Cukor, John Huston, Vincente Minnelli 1953 DGA (12) Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Above and Beyond Walter Lang, Call Me Madam Daniel Mann, Come Back, Little Sheba Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Julius Caesar Henry Koster, The Robe Jean Negulesco, Titanic George Sidney, Young Bess DGA/AMPAS George Stevens, Shane Charles Walters, Lili Billy Wilder, Stalag 17 William Wyler, Roman Holiday Fred Zinnemann, From Here to Eternity   1954 DGA (16) Edward Dmytryk, The Caine Mutiny Alfred Hitchcock, Dial M for Murder Robert Wise, Executive Suite Anthony Mann, The Glenn Miller Story Samuel Fuller, Hell and High Water Henry King, King of Khyber Rifles Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Knock on Wood Don Siegel, Riot in Cell Block 11 Stanley Donen, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers George Cukor, A Star Is Born Jean Negulesco,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Worth Remembering:  William Holden (1918-1981) and Glenn Ford (1916-2006) – Golden Boys

By most accounts, Harry Cohn was a royal son of a bitch.

For the uninformed, Harry Cohn was co-founder of Columbia Pictures, and the autocratic ruler of the studio from its founding in 1919 until his death in 1958. He was vulgar, crass, tyrannical, a screaming, foul-mouthed verbal bully i.e. a royal son of a bitch.

He was also a cheap son of a bitch.

Originally considered a “Poverty Row” studio, Cohn’s Columbia – at least at first – refused to build a roster of salaried stars as the other studios did. Cohn didn’t want the overhead or the headaches he saw saddling other studio chiefs with their contract talent. Cheaper and easier was to pay those studios a flat fee for the one-time use of their marquee value stars to give Columbia’s B-budgeted flicks an A-list shine. Columbia was considered such a nickel-and-dime outfit at the time that other
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Win It: A Peninsula Chicago Hotel Vacation!

Win It: A Peninsula Chicago Hotel Vacation!
The Peninsula Chicago is celebrating their 10th anniversary and they want you to be there!

"Extra" is giving away a phenomenal package, valued at $10,000, to one lucky friend and a guest. It includes:

--Roundtrip airfare for two to Chicago

--Two-night stay in a Peninsula Executive Suite

--Two 60-minute spa treatments at the Peninsula Spa by Espa

--Royal tea for two

--Chauffeured service in a cool Mini Cooper

Sign up to become an "Extra" friend and
See full article at Extra »

Worth Remembering: Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990):  The Dame from Brooklyn

A classy dame. A dynamite broad. A tough cookie. The language is definitely un-pc…and yet, it seems not only proper but singularly apt when talking about Barbara Stanwyck. It was the language of the day when her star soared off into the ascent, and it would remain so her over the course of a 60-year career on stage, film, and TV, it would be criminal to clean it up for politeness’ sake. It was the kind of language she unabashedly used herself in her later years, describing herself frankly, bluntly, and with characteristic modesty – as was her wont – as “…a tough old broad from Brooklyn.”

And, kiddo (as she’d probably say), she was. She had to be.

She was four-year-old Ruby Stevens when a drunk pushed her mother off a streetcar killing her, and her father, unable to cope, ran off. She bounced from one foster home to another,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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