Les diaboliques
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Diabolique (1955) More at IMDbPro »Les diaboliques (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

12 items from 2013


31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: #20-11

13 October 2013 9:18 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time around for one reason: that is, the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. Enjoy!

Special Mention:

Outer Space

Written and directed by Peter Tscherkassky

Austria, 2000

Outer Space has gained a reputation over the years as being a key experimental film alongside the works of such legends as Stan Brakhage and Michael Snow. Horror buffs will recognise the actress in the short as Oscar nominee Barbara Hershey. »

- Ricky da Conceição

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31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: #10-1

11 October 2013 9:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time around for one simple reason: that is, the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. Enjoy!

Special Mention:

Un chien andalou

Directed by Luis Buñuel

Written by Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel

France, 1929

The dream – or nightmare – has been a staple of horror cinema for decades. In 1929, Luis Bunuel joined forces with Salvador Dali to create Un chien andalou, an experimental and unforgettable 17-minute surrealist masterpiece. »

- Ricky da Conceição

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Top 10 action movies

10 October 2013 12:27 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Yippee-ki-yay! It's action-movie time! From Die Hard to Deliverance, here's what the Guardian and Observer's critics think are the 10 best ever made. Let us know what you think in the comments below

• Top 10 romantic movies

Peter Bradshaw on action movies

In some ways, it should be the quintessential cinema genre. After all, what does the director shout at the beginning of a take? Action – at times a euphemism for violence and machismo – evolved into a recognisable genre in the 80s. Gunplay and athleticism resurfaced in a sweatier and more explicitly violent form, with movies such as Sylvester Stallone's First Blood. The hardware was all-important, and the metallic sheen of the guns was something to be savoured alongside the musculature of the heroes. The genre spawned the action hero. These were not pretty-boys there to melt female hearts: they were there to get a roar of approval from the guys. »

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'Eyes Without a Face' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

8 October 2013 3:32 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I hadn't heard of Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face until last year, following a screening of Holy Motors in Cannes when someone noted how Edith Scob was wearing a similar white mask (see here) to the one she wore throughout all but a few minutes of Eyes, where she plays the scarred daughter of a high profile Paris surgeon (Pierre Brasseur). Come to learn, the film's influence is more widespread than that, including films such as Pedro Almodovar's Skin I Live In, the mask for Michael Myers in John Carpenter's Halloween and even Tim Burton's Batman as Jerry Hall wears a mask to cover her face playing The Joker's secret lover, Alicia Hunt. Little did Alicia know, her plunge out the window was decided almost 30 years earlier. Described as a horror, the adjectives "lyrical" and poetic are also associated with this film and both are incredibly appropriate. »

- Brad Brevet

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Blu-ray, DVD Release: La Cage aux Folles

19 June 2013 1:42 PM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Sept. 10, 2013

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Ugo Tognazzi (l.) and Michel Serrault take it as it comes in La Cage aux Folles.

A modest French comedy that became a breakout art-house smash in America, Edouard Molinaro’s 1978 film La Cage aux Folles inspired a major Broadway musical and the blockbuster remake The Birdcage.

Renato (La grande bouffe’s Ugo Tognazzi) and Albin (Diabolique’s Michel Serrault)—a middle-aged gay couple who are the manager and star performer at a glitzy drag club in St. Tropez—agree to hide their sexual identities, along with their flamboyant personalities and home decor, when the ultraconservative parents of Renato’s son’s fiancée come for a visit. This elegant comic scenario kicks off a wild and warmhearted farce about the importance of nonconformity and the beauty of being true to oneself.

Filled with period color, hilarious performances and ahead-of-its-time social message, »

- Laurence

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Massive, 50% Off Criterion Collection Blu-ray Sale at Amazon

6 June 2013 8:45 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Amazon is having a massive sale on Criterion Collection titles, virtually all of them listed at 50% off and I have included more than 115 of the available titles directly below along with a selection of ten I consider must owns. Titles beyond my top ten include Amarcord, Christopher Nolan's Following, David Fincher's The Game, Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory and The Killing, Roman Polansk's Rosemary's Baby, Wes Anderson's The Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore and The Darjeeling Limited and plenty of Terrence Malick. All the links lead directly to the Amazon website, so click on through with confidence. Small Note: By buying through the links below you help support RopeofSilicon.com as I get a small commission for the sales made through using these links. Thanks for reading and I appreciate your support. Top Ten Must Owns 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) 12 Angry Men (dir. Sidney Lumet) The 400 Blows (dir. »

- Brad Brevet

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Massive, 50% Off Criterion Collection Blu-ray Sale at Amazon

6 June 2013 8:45 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Amazon is having a massive sale on Criterion Collection titles, virtually all of them listed at 50% off and I have included more than 115 of the available titles directly below along with a selection of ten I consider must owns. Titles beyond my top ten include Amarcord, Christopher Nolan's Following, David Fincher's The Game, Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory and The Killing, Roman Polansk's Rosemary's Baby, Wes Anderson's The Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore and The Darjeeling Limited and plenty of Terrence Malick. All the links lead directly to the Amazon website, so click on through with confidence. Small Note: By buying through the links below you help support RopeofSilicon.com as I get a small commission for the sales made through using these links. Thanks for reading and I appreciate your support. Top Ten Must Owns 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) 12 Angry Men (dir. Sidney Lumet) The 400 Blows (dir. »

- Brad Brevet

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The Blu-ray/DVD Column: ‘The Burning,’ ‘The ABCs of Death,’ ‘Beautiful Creatures,’ ‘The Last Stand’ and More

21 May 2013 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. The Murderer Lives at 21 (UK release) A murderer is stalking the streets of Paris, and his only calling card is a literal calling card bearing the name “Monsieur Durand.” The police are getting nowhere fast, but when a petty criminal offers evidence that the killer resides in a local boarding house a top detective goes in undercover to ferret the murderer out for arrest. Hilarity ensues. I’m not kidding about it being hilarious either. Director Henri-Georges Clouzot would go on to make Wages of Fear, Diabolique and others, but his debut film shows an assured hand with both the visual style and a fantastic tonal balance between the mystery and the laughs. The dialogue moves at a ’40s screwball comedy pace, and it’s loaded with wit, smarts »

- Rob Hunter

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Learning from the Masters of Cinema: Henri-Georges Clouzot's The Murderer Lives At 21

20 May 2013 2:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

While Henri-Georges Clouzot is best remembered for many of his later films, including The Wages of Fear and Diabolique, the French filmmaker's 1942 debut has gone largely unseen by Western audiences until now. The Murderer Lives at 21 (L'Assassin Habite au 21), based on the novel by Belgian author Stanislas-Andre Steeman, is in fact a sequel to Georges Lacombe's The Last of Six, released a year earlier. That film also starred Pierre Fresnay and Suzy Delair, and was adapted by Clouzot for the screen. In fact, it was his dissatisfaction with the way his script was directed that inspired Clouzot to become a director himself. At the time of the film's production, World War II was in full swing and France was under the occupation of...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Blu-ray Review: 'Black Sabbath' (rerelease)

14 May 2013 3:28 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Mario Bava's playful portmanteau piece Black Sabbath (1963) is reissued by Arrow Video this week in a comprehensive two-disc set. Featuring three horrific tales of varying effectiveness, each introduced by the legendary Boris Karloff in tongue-in-cheek vignettes, the film owes a great deal to Alfred Hitchcock Presents. It also serves a great showcase for Bava's talents, all shorts being of a different tone and tackling different genre with assurance. Up first is The Drop of Water, a creepy piece focusing on Nurse Helen (Jacqueline Pierreux), called to tend the body of a recently deceased medium by her distraught maid.

While dressing the corpse for burial, Helen can't resist pilfering the old dear's ring, only to be haunted by the eerie sound of dripping and some unexpected visions upon returning home. Comprised of gorgeous sound and lighting design (deep reds, greens and purples glaze the screen throughout), this is atmospheric, unsettling »

- CineVue UK

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Top Ten Tuesday – The Best of the French

30 April 2013 11:00 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The French film industry has always been among the worlds most important……at least to film studies professors.  Most French movies are either funded by the French government or made with the support of government-linked media companies. Filmmakers face little market pressure in the creative process. That helps explain why they’re so boring!

Starbuck opens this weekend so we here at We Are Movie Geeks have decided to post this article about our favorite French films. Okay, so Starbuck is technically a Canadian film shot in Quebec, but its French language so, in our eyes that makes it French! The Hollywood remake is already in the can. It stars Vince Vaughn. The remake was originally tilted Dickie Donor but they’ve changed it to Delivery Man, so you just know they’ve screwed it up bad. This list may not line up with that of your typical French Cinema scholar. »

- Movie Geeks

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6 Great Hitchcockian Films Not Directed By Alfred Hitchcock

24 March 2013 1:50 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Steven Soderbergh’s recently released Side Effects brought this article to fruition. Although the film will probably be wiped out of everyone’s minds in a few months, you cannot help but feel the essence of one of the greatest directors of all time channeled through Soderbergh’s cinematic eye.  The very first shot in Soderbergh’s film is a clearcut and obvious homage to Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, and countless other nods to the master of suspense can be spotted elsewhere by eagle-eyed fans.

One cannot deny that no matter the filmmaker, Hitchcock’s influence lives on and is as pivotal to film directors today as it was back in the day – even for those who do not specialize with thrillers. As you can probably notice by now, Alfred Hitchcock is one of those names that any film enthusiast should get tattooed across their chest someday. Okay, not really, »

- Alex Aagaard

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

12 items from 2013


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