Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) - News Poster

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Competition: Win ‘The Incredible Shrinking Man’ from Arrow Video!

To celebrate the Blu-ray release of The Incredible Shrinking Man, available on Blu-ray from 13th November, we have a copy of the film on Blu-ray up for grabs, courtesy of Arrow Video!

Based on the novel by the massively influential sci-fi and horror writer Richard Matheson (I Am Legend, The Martian Chronicles), with a script adapted by Matheson himself, and directed by Fifties sci-fi king Jack Arnold (Creature From The Black Lagoon), this is rightly regarded as being one of the finest science-fiction films of all time, a critically-acclaimed smash hit that currently has a 90 per cent score on Rotten Tomatoes. Genuinely thrilling, and, as Scott’s plight becomes more desperate, tense and gruelling, the film features superbly realised special effects that bely the era, and the setting Scott finds himself in – filled with oversized household objects that suddenly become threatening and dangerous – takes on a wonderfully surreal atmosphere.

This
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Giveaway – Win The Incredible Shrinking Man on Blu-ray

To celebrate the Blu-ray release of The Incredible Shrinking Man, available on Blu-ray from 13th November, we have a copy of the film on Blu-ray up for grabs, courtesy of Arrow Video!

Based on the novel by the massively influential sci-fi and horror writer Richard Matheson (I Am Legend, The Martian Chronicles), with a script adapted by Matheson himself, and directed by Fifties sci-fi king Jack Arnold (Creature From The Black Lagoon), this is rightly regarded as being one of the finest science-fiction films of all time, a critically-acclaimed smash hit that currently has a 90 per cent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

Genuinely thrilling, and, as Scott’s plight becomes more desperate, tense and gruelling, the film features superbly realised special effects that bely the era, and the setting Scott finds himself in – filled with oversized household objects that suddenly become threatening and dangerous – takes on a wonderfully surreal atmosphere.

This
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Shape of Water’ Red Band Trailer: Guillermo del Toro’s Latest Adult Fairytale

  • Slash Film
‘The Shape of Water’ Red Band Trailer: Guillermo del Toro’s Latest Adult Fairytale
The Shape of Water, one of the best films of the year, has revealed a new red band trailer for your enjoyment. Guillermo del Toro‘s beautiful, romantic adult fairytale focuses on the unlikely romance that blossoms between a mute janitor and a Creature From the Black Lagoon-like Fish Man. The Shape of Water red band trailer awaits you […]

The post ‘The Shape of Water’ Red Band Trailer: Guillermo del Toro’s Latest Adult Fairytale appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Ten Classic Scary Movies For Halloween

I have known for years, many people will not watch black and white movies, of any kind. It has to be color and no older than 10 years, preferably movies made this year, or last year. I have had people look at me with astonishment when I tell them I not only watch black and white movies regularly but even silent movies. I’ve had people admit they didn’t know movies were being made in 1927, much less 1915.

So for this Hallowe’en, when movie geeks thoughts turn to scary movies here is my personal and eclectic list of great, old, scary movies, filmed in glorious black and white.

10. Nosferatu 1922

The Great Grand Daddy of all Dracula movies, and the template for every vampire movie ever made, the first, one of the best and still creepy, even if you’ve seen it repeatedly. A silent masterpiece by Fw Murnau and with
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Lumière Festival: Guillermo del Toro on the Catholic Church, his Holy Trinity and Boris Karloff Epiphany

Lumière Festival: Guillermo del Toro on the Catholic Church, his Holy Trinity and Boris Karloff Epiphany
Lyon, France — In a wide-ranging discussion at Lyon’s Lumière Festival on Monday, Guillermo del Toro talked about the creative and disturbing influence of the Catholic Church, his own personal Holy Trinity, the unique aspects of cinema, his desire to work with Michael Mann and George Miller on a book project and his Boris Karloff-inspired epiphany.

Asked how he is able to translate nightmares into beautiful dreams, Del Toro quipped, “I had a f****d up childhood.”

The imagery of Mexico’s Catholic Church, which Del Toro described as second only to that of the Philippines in goriness and anatomical accurateness, was a main factor.

“There was a Christ in my church with an exposed bone fracture, and it was kind of green and purple, but his face looked like he was coming. And then they said, ‘The body of Christ,’ and I said, ‘No thank you.’

“In Guadalajara, of all f*****g cities,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10+ Years Later: Does The Creature From The Black Lagoon Sink or Swim?

Not many people know this, but the Creature from the Black Lagoon has my wedding ring. True story. Several years ago, fellow Screen Anarchist Dave Canfield, for whatever reason, mailed a box of various and sundry Creature from the Black Lagoon plastic figurines to my kids. They divvied it all up, leaving a six or seven inch tall glow-in-the-dark Creature figurine for me. I promptly placed him proudly on my dresser. There he stands, with his arm up-stretched, and literally keeping me up at night. My wife, bless her, thought to drop my wedding ring onto the Creatures' arm, for safe keeping, since I can't sleep with metal on my fingers. It's been a daily thing ever since. The kids had never seen The Creature...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Shape of Water Has a Shocking Human / Fish Monster Sex Scene

  • MovieWeb
Shape of Water Has a Shocking Human / Fish Monster Sex Scene
It is very early in the fall movie season, but that means we are starting to see some potential Oscar contenders emerge. A few movies have been getting a ton of awards season buzz on the festival circuit already, with Guillermo Del Toro's The Shape of Water being one of the most discussed and critically-praised movies making the rounds thus far. And it just so happens that the movie features a crazy sex scene.

Warning: spoilers ahead for The Shape of Water. While speaking with The Hollywood Reporter, Doug Jones, who plays the fish monster in question, spoke about The Shape of Water and the bizarre sex scene. Jones has worked with Guillermo Del Toro frequently in the past, portraying Abe Sapien in the Hellboy movies, in addition to having parts in Pan's Labyrinth and Crimson Peak. Despite their excellent established relationship, Del Toro was hesitant when it came
See full article at MovieWeb »

Shape of Water Red Band Trailer Unleashes R-Rated Monster Mayhem

  • MovieWeb
Shape of Water Red Band Trailer Unleashes R-Rated Monster Mayhem
Will a Fishman sweep the Oscars? That's the buzz around Hollywood as more and more people get a look at Guillermo Del Toro's The Shape of Water. A new R-rated red band trailer has arrived, and it unleashes the monster at the heart of this tale in its full glory. There is no mystery left in discovering what it looks like once you buy the ticket. Which is a shame, but that's the way these things work nowadays.

Some wondered why The Shape of Water needed to be R-Rated in the first place. There is a great scene between bad guy Michael Shannon and star Sally Hawkins that is suitable for open-minded families with a sense of humor, but goes just a little above the call of a PG-13 rating. It looks like a scene that will be cheered by crowds in a large theater, and it would have been shameful to cut.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Tiff 2017. Correspondences #8

  • MUBI
Dear Danny and Kelley,I like that that you use the word “traveling,” which marvelously evokes both the continuous physical wandering from one screen to the next, as well as the transporting experience of the cinematic rabbit-holes themselves. These travels can have a palpably elemental side, and this year’s Tiff has offered generous lashings of fire (mother!), air (The Florida Project), and crumbly earth (Let the Corpses Tan). Now comes the aquatic side with Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, a luxuriously fanciful rendering of an amphibious King Kong out of the primeval Amazon and into Baltimore circa 1962. A fairy tale, as stated in narration and visualized under the opening credits, in which the camera swims through a majestically submerged abode that’s gradually drained and revealed as the shabby apartment of the protagonist. Introduced as “the princess without a voice,” mute cleaning lady Elisa (Sally Hawkins
See full article at MUBI »

Guillermo del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Brings Tears, F-Bombs to Toronto

  • The Wrap
Guillermo del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Brings Tears, F-Bombs to Toronto
Two days after winning the top jury prize at the Venice Film Festival, Guillermo del Toro’s deliriously romantic creature feature “The Shape of Water” had its first public showing at the Toronto International Film Festival. And once again, the film enraptured an audience with its unlikely but spectacular love story between a lonely, mute woman and an aquatic creature that looks like a marginally friendlier version of the Creature From the Black Lagoon. On a ridiculously overcrowded night that also saw the Tiff public premieres of Andy Serkis’ “Breathe,” Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing,” Joe Wright’s “Darkest Hour,” Angelina Jolie’s “First They.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell

‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell
Artists create worlds that are extreme visions of our own. This fall, several films accomplish this with varying degrees of success; Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” is the most accomplished. Del Toro builds, brick by brick, an immersive fantasy world (shot in Toronto around the venerable Elgin Theatre) inspired by the ’60s melodramas of Douglas Sirk and the horror classic “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” that could only come from his prodigious imagination.

Cinephiles will fall happily into this fairy-tale romance that matches lonely mute laboratory cleaning woman Eliza Esposito (incandescent Sally Hawkins, who will be nominated for her sensual, powerful performance) with a well-muscled captive merman (Doug Jones). They see beauty and sensuality in each other where others see abhorrent aberration.

You can argue that Michael Shannon is typecast as the heartless government villain who tortures the gorgeous aquatic creature he calls “the asset,” but
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell

  • Indiewire
‘mother!’ and ‘The Shape of Water’: 2 Strong, Strange Oscar Movies, But One Will Be a Harder Sell
Artists create worlds that are extreme visions of our own. This fall, several films accomplish this with varying degrees of success; Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” is the most accomplished. Del Toro builds, brick by brick, an immersive fantasy world (shot in Toronto around the venerable Elgin Theatre) inspired by the ’60s melodramas of Douglas Sirk and the horror classic “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” that could only come from his prodigious imagination.

Cinephiles will fall happily into this fairy-tale romance that matches lonely mute laboratory cleaning woman Eliza Esposito (incandescent Sally Hawkins, who will be nominated for her sensual, powerful performance) with a well-muscled captive merman (Doug Jones). They see beauty and sensuality in each other where others see abhorrent aberration.

You can argue that Michael Shannon is typecast as the heartless government villain who tortures the gorgeous aquatic creature he calls “the asset,” but
See full article at Indiewire »

‘It’: The Six Most Important Differences Between the Film and Stephen King’s Book

  • Indiewire
‘It’: The Six Most Important Differences Between the Film and Stephen King’s Book
Clowns were always creepy, but then Stephen King came along. In 1986, King published “It,” which introduced the world to seven scrappy kids nicknamed The Losers Club, who faced off against a child-killing, shape-shifting clown named Pennywise, an evil entity that was infesting their hometown of Derry, Maine. Derry had popped up in several King novels before “It,” including “Pet Cemetery” and the novella “The Body,” which served as the source material for the film “Stand By Me,” but it wasn’t until “It” that King fans really got to know the dark history and evil lurking in the sewers of the fictional Maine town.

With King’s mammoth novel sitting around 1,138 pages, the bloody details of Derry’s darkest days are fleshed out across multiple time periods. But, as with so many film adaptations of classic novels, not everything in the book makes the final cut. Even 1990’s “It” TV mini-series,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Iconic Horror Movie Scene That Inspired ‘The Shape of Water’

The Iconic Horror Movie Scene That Inspired ‘The Shape of Water’
When we laid eyes on the trailer for Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, we couldn’t help but think of Creature from the Black Lagoon. The film looks to be Del Toro’s take on Universal’s 1954 classic, which is interesting because he was at one point attached to a remake. Not surprisingly, it was indeed […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Flipper Season One

Back in 1964 a lot of people still thought dolphins were fish, but by the time this TV show was finished, we all knew that our happy undersea friend was smarter than the average bear and lives in a world full of wonder. Ivan Tors’ grandly successful Florida-shot family show kept a lot of seagoing movie veterans in green seaweed, including both original ‘Creature’ Gill Men.

Flipper, Season One

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1964-65 / Color / 1:33 flat TV / 780 min. / Street Date August 29, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 39.95

Starring: Brian Kelly, Luke Halpin, Tommy Norden.

Cinematography: Clifford H. Poland Jr., Lamar Boren

Original Music: Henry Vars, song by

Written by: Jack Cowden, Ricou Browning, Peter L. Dixon, Laird Koenig, Stanley H. Silverman, Orville H. Hampton, Lee Erwin, Art Arthur, Jess Carneol, Key Lenard, Ivan Tors, Alan Caillou, Arthur Richards, Robert Sabaroff.

Produced by Ivan Tors, Ricou Browning, Leon Benson, Andrew Marton

Directed by: Ricou Browning,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Tobor The Great" (1954); Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Though heavyweights Columbia and Universal produced as many serials as Republic Pictures from 1929-1956, the latter studio is generally best known for its exciting sound-era chapter-plays. Universal and the less widely known Mascot Pictures were in the game the earliest; both studios began releasing their sound serials in 1929. Mascot would only last six years or so. Universal – choosing to concentrate exclusively on the production of feature films – effectively got out of the serial business in 1946. Republic and Columbia hung on to the production of chapter-plays the longest; they released their final serials in 1955 and 1956, respectively.

Republic wasn’t only a serials factory. The studio was in the low budget feature filmmaking business as well, busily churning out a dizzying array of westerns, adventure pictures, and mysteries. They would test the box-office potentials of the horror film market during the 1940s with limited success. As a second-tier “Poverty Row” studio,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

With ‘The Shape of Water,’ Guillermo del Toro Realizes a Lifelong Monster Dream

With ‘The Shape of Water,’ Guillermo del Toro Realizes a Lifelong Monster Dream
Guillermo del Toro is a hugger.

Not a facehugger, like those nasty creatures in Ridley Scott’s “Alien” — a film whose Lovecraftian monsters both scarred and inspired del Toro when he first saw it at age 14 — but a good old-fashioned bear hugger.

The first thing that strikes you on visiting his Bleak House mansion in Thousand Oaks, which is packed with movie and monster memorabilia, is the terrifying, life-size demon that appears to be lunging down the hallway and toward any would-be intruder (a memento from the first “Hellboy” movie). But a close second would be the big, bearded Mexican who emerges, Bilbo Baggins-like, to hug the latest visitor to his domain.

Del Toro’s actual home is the building next door to Bleak House, but the monster manor is where he does his best work, preferring to write in a room where simulated rain falls on the windows.

A warm embrace is not the greeting one
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Shape of Water review – Guillermo del Toro's fantasy has monster-sized heart

Sally Hawkins stars as a cleaner smitten with a scaly underwater beast in this cold war-era creature feature that melds ravishing romance with B-movie thrills

Guillermo del Toro’s new film is a ravishing 60s-set romance, sweet, sad and sexy. It’s about two lonely hearts who like to meet up during lunch break at work, passing food back and forth and listening to records on a portable turntable. Together, they overcome their impediments and start merrily bounding over all the hurdles in their path – such as the fact that lovelorn Elisa is mute, unable to speak since she was a child. Or that her boyfriend has fins and gills and lives underwater, like the Creature from the Black Lagoon. The course of true love was never meant to run smooth.

I confess that I’ve been agnostic about Del Toro in the past – filing the Mexican film-maker away as
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘The Shape of Water’ Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight

  • The Wrap
‘The Shape of Water’ Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight
In the opening sequence of “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro’s lovely genre-bending love story, there’s a fire at a chocolate factory, prompting a character to note that the smell of toasted cocoa in the air blends “horror and delight.” And while the line might be a tad on the nose, it’s a perfect prompt for the gorgeous and grotesque romance that del Toro (and co-writer Vanessa Taylor, “Hope Springs”) unspools. There are elements of “Beauty and the Beast,” “E.T.,” “Amélie” and “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” at play here, but as always, del Toro takes the stories.
See full article at The Wrap »

Tobor the Great

Robot roll call! This also-ran robotic fantasy from the 1950s is precisely the kind of movie one would expect from Republic, a two-fisted anti-Commie tract for juveniles. The studio comes up with an impressive robo-hero, but short-changes us when it come time for action thrills. Still, as pointed out in Richard Harland Smith’s new commentary, Tobor filled the the kiddie hunger for sci-fi matinees, at least until Robby the Robot came along.

Tobor the Great

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1954 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 77 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Charles Drake, Karin Booth, Billy Chapin, Taylor Holmes, Steven Geray, Hal Baylor, Alan Reynolds, Peter Brocco, Robert Shayne, Lyle Talbot, William Schallert

Cinematography: John L. Russell

Production Design: Gabriel Scognamillo

Special Effects: Howard and Theodore Lydecker

Film Editor: Basil Wrangell

Original Music: Howard Jackson

Written by Philip MacDonald, Carl Dudley

Produced by Richard Goldstone

Directed by Lee Sholem
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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