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Casanova's Big Night (1954)

6.8
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Ratings: 6.8/10 from 606 users  
Reviews: 14 user | 2 critic

A meek tailor thinks his wooing will be helped if he assumes the identity of the famous Casanova...who's deeply in debt.

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(written for the screen by), (written for the screen by), 1 more credit »
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Title: Casanova's Big Night (1954)

Casanova's Big Night (1954) on IMDb 6.8/10

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Pippo Popolino
...
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Elena Di Gambetta
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Lucio / Narrator
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Stefano Di Gambetta
Arnold Moss ...
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Foressi
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Maggiorin
Hope Emerson ...
Duchess of Castelbello
Robert Hutton ...
Raphael, Duc of Castelbello
...
Emo the Murderer (as Lon Chaney)
...
Frieda Inescort ...
Signora Di Gambetta
Primo Carnera ...
Corfa
Frank Puglia ...
Carabaccio
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Storyline

Italy, 1757. Lowly tailor Pippo Popolino disguises himself as the great Casanova in order to romance attractive widow Francesca. He little suspects what he's getting into: locked into the incongruous role by the desperation of the real Casanova's creditors, Pippo must journey to Venice on a delicate mission far beyond his capabilities. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 April 1954 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Mr. Casanova  »

Box Office

Gross:

$3,500,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When a tablecloth catches onto Pippo during his dance with Elena, all the far-end plates and glass goblets adhere to the tablecloth, obviously glued. It's much funnier this way than a floor covered realistically in broken glass. See more »

Goofs

Pippo is thrown off the balcony by Giacomo Casanova, and when he bounces on the cemented flagstones in the street, one of the flagstones bounces with him. See more »

Quotes

Lucio: [introducing Francesca on the fly] This is... his, um... um, his first cousin.
Pippo Popolino: First by a mile!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Casanova (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Tic-A-Tic-A-Tic
by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
Sung by Bob Hope (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Bob at his Best
7 January 2003 | by (Swindon, England) – See all my reviews

This is a great film for all Bob Hope fans and lovers of vintage comedy everywhere. The colour, as in a lot of these old movies, is very rich and is a real treat for the eyes. As pointed out by other reviewers, the theme is quite similar to that of Bob's earlier black and white film "Monsieur Beaucaire", but none the worse for it.

In order to save a group of merchants from bankruptcy, Bob, as Pippo Popolino, a miserable tailor's apprentice, agrees to impersonate the great lover "Casanova". As Casanova, he is engaged by a Duchess to test the love of her son's future bride and is promised a large sum of money if succeeding in the seduction. The jokes arrive thick and fast and as usual, Bob's delivery is masterful. Ironically though, for me, one of the funniest lines comes from Basil Rathbone who, playing Lucio, the former servant of Casanova sharing in the deception of the impersonation of his former master, declares to the hapless Pippo at a particularly frustrating moment "You'll never be anyone other than Pippo Popolino and I can't think of anything more insulting!". There are excellent supporting roles from the aforementioned Rathbone and Arnold Moss as the Doge, who our hero refers to as "a snake with a beard". There are some great visual jokes too with Bob remarking while dancing with his intended victim "I have a big following in Venice" at which point his sword drags a tablecloth loaded with crockery from a table, which he then trails behind him in the dance and tries to kick away nonchalantly. What really makes the film though is the pace and delivery of Bob's stream of one-liners.

Mr Hope at his very best!


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