6.9/10
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48 user 38 critic

Carmen Jones (1954)

Approved | | Drama, Musical, Romance | 28 October 1954 (USA)
Contemporary version of the Bizet opera, with new lyrics and an African-American cast.

Director:

Writers:

(book) (as Oscar Hammerstein 2nd), (screenplay)
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ON DISC
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Joe
...
...
Frankie
Olga James ...
Cindy Lou
Joe Adams ...
...
Sergeant Brown (as Broc Peters)
Roy Glenn ...
Rum Daniels
Nick Stewart ...
...
LeVern Hutcherson ...
Joe (voice) (as Le Vern Hutcherson)
Marilyn Horne ...
Carmen Jones (voice) (as Marilynn Horne)
Marvin Hayes ...
Husky Miller (voice)
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Storyline

At an all-black army camp, civilian parachute maker and "hot bundle" Carmen Jones is desired by many of the men. Naturally, she wants Joe, who's engaged to sweet Cindy Lou and about to go into pilot training for the Korean War. Going after him, she succeeds only in getting him into the stockade. While she awaits his release, trouble approaches for both of them. Songs from the Bizet opera with modernized lyrics. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 October 1954 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Oscar Hammerstein's Carmen Jones  »

Box Office

Budget:

$750,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording) (magnetic prints)| (optical prints)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Filming commenced on 30 June 1954 and wrapped up in early August. The soundtrack for the film was recorded at 20th Century Fox Studios beginning on 18 June 1954 and continuing for several weeks. See more »

Goofs

Reflected in a window as Carmen is walking through town. See more »

Quotes

Joe: Thanks, but I don't drink.
Carmen Jones: Boy, if the army was made up of nothin' but soldiers like you, war wouldn't do nobody no good.
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Connections

Version of Carmen (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

STRING ME HIGH ON A TREE
Music by Georges Bizet
Lyrics Oscar Hammerstein II
Based on "Duet and Final Chorus"
Performed by Harry Belafonte (dubbed by LeVern Hutcherson (as Le Vern Hutcherson)) and Dorothy Dandridge (dubbed by Marilyn Horne (as Marilynn Horne))
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User Reviews

 
Wonderful musical melodrama
20 January 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

An all-black version of "Carmen". It's updated to the 1950s with wild and incredibly sexy Carmen (Dorothy Dandridge) falling for honest, nice serviceman Joe (Harry Belafonte)...and destroying him and his life.

All the singing (except for Pearl Bailey) was dubbed. Dandridge and Belafonte could definitely sing but they didn't have the voices to carry off operatic songs. This seems kind of a strange way to do "Carmen" (I mean by updating it to the 1950s) but it still works. It's colorful, full of life and never dull. BTW I HATE opera but I loved this! The dubbing seems strange (and obvious) at first but you eventually get used to it.

The acting varies. The minor roles are all well played but Belafonte seems off as Joe. He looks miserable and even though he's a tall and very handsome guy he seems no match for Dandridge. His soft voice works against him. Pearl Bailey has a small role but she's great. She dominates the screen every time she's on camera. But this is Dandridge's movie all the way. She's just great--VERY sexy and one hell of an actress. She was also the first black actress to ever be nominated as Best Actress (she didn't win). There was a LOT of infighting on the set--director Otto Preminger was known to be a dictator and he was on this movie. He had frequent screaming matches with Pearl Bailey! And Bailey HATED Dandridge--it's a credit to both of them that it doesn't show in the movie. WELL worth catching even if you hate opera. I heard some people hate this because it's done by an all black cast. That's silly---and racist.

Look for the scene on the street where Dandridge is on the street in front of a glass window--you can see the entire camera crew reflected!


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