The Caine Mutiny (1954) - News Poster

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Battle Cry

Move over James JonesLeon Uris clobbers the big screen with a sprawling adaptation of his WW2 combat novel, loaded down with roles for promising young actors. This is the one where twice as much time is spent on love affairs than fighting. War may be hell, but if Mona Freeman, Nancy Olson, Dorothy Malone and Allyn McLerie are going to be there for comfort, sign me up.

Battle Cry

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 148 min. / Street Date , 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Van Heflin, Aldo Ray, Mona Freeman, Nancy Olson, James Whitmore, Raymond Massey, Tab Hunter, Dorothy Malone, Anne Francis, William Campbell, Fess Parker, Justus E. McQueen (L.Q. Jones), Perry Lopez, Jonas Applegarth, Tommy Cook, Felix Noriego, Susan Morrow, Carleton Young, Rhys Williams, Allyn Ann McLerie, Gregory Walcott, Frank Ferguson, Sarah Selby, Willis Bouchey, Victor Milian.

Cinematography: Sidney Hickox

Film Editor: William H. Zeigler

Original Music: Max Steiner
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Rare Conversation With Pulitzer Prize.Winning Writer Herman Wouk

  • Vulture
Herman Wouk has never been one for half-measures. His two-volume World War II saga, The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, ran to nearly 2,000 pages and was adapted into a corresponding pair of TV miniseries. His third novel, The Caine Mutiny, won a Pulitzer, spawned a Broadway play, and gave Humphrey Bogart a defining role of his career. Wouk’s meaty, breezy fiction (on the Navy, the Holocaust, Israel, Nixon, a starry-eyed Jewish girl who called herself Marjorie Morningstar) earned him millions of readers but precious few glowing reviews. Still, even as he aged out of both the cultural center and the typical human lifespan, the strict Orthodox Jew kept on writing. Last week, at the age of 100, he finally published a memoir — of sorts. Sailor and Fiddler skims his life story in two parts: “Sailor,” devoted to work and show business, and “Fiddler,” on Israel and
See full article at Vulture »

Broken Lance | Blu-ray Review

Director Edward Dmytryk, one of the infamous Hollywood Ten blacklisted by McCarthy and his goons in 1947 Hollywood, debuted the most famous title in his filmography seven years later with war drama The Caine Mutiny. That very same year, in fact, only about a month later, he would premiere another title, a robust 1880s set Western starring Spencer Tracy, a title which would also win Oscar glory. Overshadowed by the popularity of Caine, however, the film seems to have disappeared from contemporary discussions of Dmytryk’s work (never able to divorce himself from his eventual testimony in front of Huac), a shame considering it’s a gripping, framed familial saga of intergenerational misunderstandings, racial hang-ups, and eventually even a court-room drama.

Young Joe Devereaux (Robert Wagner) is released from serving a three year prison sentence and immediately returns to his abandoned familial homestead to wreak vengeance on those who wronged him.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Today is Boris Karloff’s Birthday – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

No other actor in the long history of horror has been so closely identified with the genre as Boris Karloff, yet he was as famous for his gentle heart and kindness as he was for his screen persona. William Henry Pratt was born on November 23, 1887, in Camberwell, London, England. He studied at London University in anticipation of a diplomatic career; however, he moved to Canada in 1909 and joined a theater company where he was bit by the acting bug. It was there that he adopted the stage name of “Boris Karloff.” He toured back and forth across the USA for over ten years in a variety of low-budget Theater shows and eventually ended up in Hollywood. Needing cash to support himself, Karloff landed roles in silent films making his on-screen debut in Chapter 2 of the 1919 serial The Masked Rider. His big
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

DVD Review: "Callaway Went Thataway" (1951) Starring Fred MacMurray, Dorothy McGuire And Howard Keel; Warner Archives Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

The Warner Archive has released the 1951 comedy Callaway Went Thataway. The film is a low-key but delightful tale that has more than a wisp of Frank Capra in its story line. The movie opens with a montage of scenes showing young boys and girls glued to their television sets as they watch the adventures of singing cowboy Smoky Callaway (Howard Keel). They don't realize they are actually viewing old "B" movies from the 1930s. Not that it matters. Callaway has found a new audience with a younger generation and they have made him America's favorite TV hero in these early days of the medium.(Since so many households did not have televisions in 1951, the film shows a common sight during this era: people crowded around department store windows to watch TV broadcasts). Network brass and sponsors immediately want to keep the gold train rolling by initiating more new films starring Smoky.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Mel Gibson: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

Mel Gibson, whom I interviewed for Venice Magazine in late 2000, was my first real childhood hero I sat down with. If you were a Gen-x male, Mel Gibson was the closest thing we had to Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Sean Connery: a guy's guy whom guys wanted to emulate and women wanted to copulate. If you were a guy who liked girls, the math in the previous equation was pretty simple: be like Mel. Sadly, Gibson's life has taken a very public turn for the worse in the last decade, since his personal legal and troubles stemming from a 2006 DUI arrest in Malibu were made public, one from which his image has yet to fully recover. It was an unfortunate fall from grace for a guy who literally had Hollywood, and the world, in the palm of his hand after sweeping the 1995 Oscars with his box office smash "Braveheart.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

'Dukes of Hazzard' Star James Best Dead at 88

'Dukes of Hazzard' Star James Best Dead at 88
Actor James Best, who played hapless Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane for six seasons on the hit CBS series The Dukes of Hazzard, died Monday, April 6th, in hospice care in Hickory, North Carolina. According to the Charlotte Observer, Best died from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

Best was born Jules Guy in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, the youngest of nine children. His mother, who died when he was three, was the sister of Ike Everly, the father of music duo the Everly Brothers. After her death, the child was adopted and raised in Indiana.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Sentinel (1977) Blu-ray Announced by Scream Factory

You can't choose your neighbors in an apartment complex, and sometimes you get stuck next to a noisy, mean-spirited soul who makes you want to look in the classified ads before you even finish unpacking. Alison Parker has some rowdy neighbors around her new Brooklyn apartment, but what disturbs her the most is that nobody else lives on her floor. And that's only one of many creepy elements to be found in 1977's The Sentinel, and fans of the cult classic fright film should be excited to hear that Scream Factory has announced they will release The Sentinel on Blu-ray this summer.

From Scream Factory: "We are beyond thrilled today to report that we will be bringing the 1977 cult classic chiller The Sentinel to Blu-ray for the first time in the U.S. and Canada!

Planned release is for August. This often underrated, overlooked and shocking film from Director Michael Winner
See full article at DailyDead »

James Garner has passed away at age 86

  • JoBlo
James Garner, acclaimed actor of both TV and film, passed away on Saturday from natural causes at age 86. Born James Scott Bumgarner, he dropped out of high school at age 16 to join the United States Merchant Marines, eventually going on to receive 2 Purple Hearts during the Korean War. His first acting opportunity came in the form of a non-speaking role in the Broadway stage play The Caine Mutiny Court Martial in 1954. Working bit parts in television and film, Garner eventually landed the...
See full article at JoBlo »

Maverick, The Rockford Files: James Garner Dies at 86

Television legend James Garner has died at the age of 86. He reportedly passed away late last night.

Garner began his career with a non-speaking role in The Caine Mutiny Court Martial on Broadway after helping actor Lloyd Nolan learn his lines. He then landed a regular role in the touring production.

From there, he moved on to small roles in movies and television. While he found success starring in more than 50 films over the course of his career -- including The Thrill of It All, The Americanization of Emily, Victor/Victoria, Murphy's Romance, Support Your Local Sheriff!, and The Notebook -- Garner really made his mark on the small screen.

He starred in a comedic Western, Maverick, in 1957 on ABC. Garner's Bret Maverick character sought out high-stakes poker games and rarely stayed in one place for very long. Unlike
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Actor James Garner Dead at 86

©2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved

Oscar-nominated actor James Garner has passed away at the age of 86.

From AP:

Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western “Maverick” led to a stellar career in TV and films such as “The Rockford Files” and his Oscar-nominated “Murphy’s Romance,” was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday.

Police responded to a call around 8 p.m. Pdt and confirmed Garner’s identity from family members, Iniquez told The Associated Press.

There was no immediate word on a more specific cause of death. Garner had suffered a stroke in May 2008, just weeks after his 80th birthday.

Although he was adept at drama and action, Garner was best known for his low-key, wisecracking style, especially with his hit TV series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

James Garner Dies

James Garner Dies
James Garner, for more than 50 years one of Hollywood's most likable leading men on the big screen and on TV, died at his Los Angeles home Saturday night, reports TMZ. He was 86. The star, best known for the Maverick and The Rockford Files TV series, had suffered what had been described as a minor stroke in 2008. Besides his popular work on the small screen, Garner also appeared opposite Julie Andrews in two critically acclaimed movies, 1964's The Americanization of Emily and 1982's Victor/Victoria. In addition, he costarred opposite Doris Day in The Thrill of It All and Move Over,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

James Garner Dies

James Garner Dies
James Garner, for more than 50 years one of Hollywood's most likable leading men on the big screen and on TV, died at his Los Angeles home Saturday night, reports TMZ. He was 86. The star, best known for the Maverick and The Rockford Files TV series, had suffered what had been described as a minor stroke in 2008. Besides his popular work on the small screen, Garner also appeared opposite Julie Andrews in two critically acclaimed movies, 1964's The Americanization of Emily and 1982's Victor/Victoria. He also costarred opposite Doris Day in The Thrill of It All and Move Over, Darling
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files’ Dies at 86

James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files’ Dies at 86
Amiable actor James Garner, whose moderately successful film career was eclipsed by two extraordinarily popular television series, “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files,” has died, according to reports. He was 86.

Like many popular leading men of Hollywood’s heyday, Garner boasted all-American good looks and a winning personality that carried him through comedy and drama alike. He was one of the first of TV’s leading men to cross over into films in the ’60s with such popular movies as “The Thrill of It All” and “The Americanization of Emily.” But he had his greatest impact in television, first on “Maverick” in the ’50s and then in the ’70s on “The Rockford Files,” for which he won an Emmy in 1977. He later appeared in several quality telepics including “Promise,” “My Name Is Bill W.” and “Barbarians at the Gate,” as well as the occasional strong feature such as “Victor/Victoria” and “Murphy’s Romance,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files,’ Dies at 86

James Garner of ‘Maverick,’ ‘Rockford Files,’ Dies at 86
Amiable film and television actor James Garner, who starred in popular television series “Maverick” and “The Rockford Files,” died Saturday at his home in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles. He was 86.

Like many popular leading men of Hollywood’s heyday, Garner boasted all-American good looks and a winning personality that carried him through comedy and drama alike. Garner won two Emmys and racked up a total of 15 nominations. He had his greatest impact in television, first on “Maverick” in the ’50s and then in the ’70s on “The Rockford Files,” for which he won an Emmy in 1977. He later appeared in several quality telepics including “Promise,” “My Name Is Bill W.” and “Barbarians at the Gate,” as well as the occasional strong feature such as “Victor/Victoria” and “Murphy’s Romance,” for which he captured his sole Oscar nomination for lead actor.

Appreciation: James Garner Gracefully Bore the Weight
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Jessup & Queeg, 'Men' and a 'Mutiny'

As Turner Classic Movies continues to play the Oscar hits all month long, last night I watched The Caine Mutiny and Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolfc. The latter I'd seen before and love, but this was my first visit with the former and while I'm sure it has been said before, the comparisons to Aaron Sorkin's screenplay for A Few Good Men are bountiful once you get to the third act court-martial of Lieutenant Steve Maryk (Van Johnson) and Ensign Keith (Robert Francis), charged with conspiring to mutiny. The charges aren't the same as those facing the two U.S. Marines in A Few Good Men and this is obviously the Navy we're dealing with, not the Marines, but the structure of the trial and in particular, the questioning of Humphrey Bogart's Lieutenant Commander Queeg is so similar it's impossible to miss. Before he begins his questioning of Queeg,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

A Story of Love and Hate: The Night of the Hunter’s Journey from Failure to American Classic

  • HeyUGuys
Director Charles Laughton’s and screenwriter James Agee’s adaptation of the novel The Night of the Hunter has become a reverently admired and extremely influential film in the 60 years since the ‘failure’ of its initial release. The film has placed very highly in many international critical polls, including Cahier du Cinema’s 2007 listing of the ‘100 Most Beautiful Films’, where it sits at #2. Many filmmakers have cited it as a key inspiration, and Steven Spielberg showed it to the crew of E.T. in order to help them understand the child’s perspective from which he wanted the film to be told. It was even re-made as a virtually unwatchable 1991 TV movie with Richard Chamberlain as Harry Powell, and a musical stage version was created in the late ‘90s for which a soundtrack CD is available.

Perhaps the most important indication of the esteem in which the film is now held
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Fred MacMurray: The Perfect Heel

  • CinemaRetro
MacMurray was brilliant in Billy Wilder's 1960 classic The Apartment, playing the philandering married boss of Shirley MacLaine.

For the baby boomer generation, Fred MacMurray was primarily known as the affable widowed dad on My Three Sons and the star of numerous Walt Disney films. However, as Movie Morlocks writer Greg Ferrara points out, MacMurray once excelled at playing charismatic creeps, giving brilliant performances in films such as Double Indemnity, The Caine Mutiny and The Apartment. Click here to appreciate the dark side of MacMurray's talents.  
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Breaking Bad' from H to Uuo: 118 elements of the series

'Breaking Bad' from H to Uuo: 118 elements of the series
On Aug. 11, Breaking Bad returns for its final eight-episode run. Before the second half of season 5 premieres, refresh your memory with this handy guide to the series — presented, naturally, in the form of the periodic table.

1. H — Hank: Schrader, Walt’s brother-in-law — a DEA agent who’s the Javert to Heisenberg’s Valjean

2. He — Heisenberg: Walt’s criminal alter-ego, named for Werner Heisenberg — a German theoretical physicist best known for his eponymous “uncertainty principle”

3. Li — Lily of the Valley: A pretty flowering plant found in cool, temperate environments and New Mexican backyards — and what Walt uses to poison Jesse
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »
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