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Brigadoon (1954) Poster

(1954)

Trivia

Star Gene Kelly and director Vincente Minnelli both wanted to film scenes on location in Scotland but the studio bosses at MGM insisted the film be shot entirely at the studio. When the movie was released critics noted the staged studio feel of the movie.
To get the effect of Brigadoon emerging from the mist, Vincente Minnelli filmed the sets with the fog being pumped in, then reversed the shot to show the mist moving away.
The long-horned cow was scary for Gene Kelly. For his scene with the animal, he ordered that it be blindfolded and chained to the floor. Plastic eyes were attached to the blindfold.
Although one of the greatest female dancers in the history of the movie musical, Cyd Charisse was not a good singer and her singing was almost always dubbed (by Carol Richards in this film).
Cyd Charisse said that, of the several films she made with Gene Kelly, this was her favorite.
The highland backdrops were over 600 feet long, and 60 feet high, and cost $382,280.
Most of the heather used in the film was really sumac spray-painted purple.
The Breen office wouldn't allow the use of the two songs the Meg Brockie character sang in the stage version, "The Love of My Life" and "My Mother's Wedding Day" as the lyrics were too risqué.
Howard Keel and Jane Powell were originally slated to play the leads. When commitments on other films left them unavailable, Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse were cast instead, and dancing subsequently emphasized over singing.
The background set was so realistic that some birds from outside flew into it.
As with The Robe (1953), Seven Brides For Seven Brothers (1954) and Oklahoma! (1955), two completely disparate versions of this film were shot simultaneously, requiring separate takes. One version was in the 2.55:1 CinemaScope ratio, the other in a less-severe 1.75:1 widescreen ratio. On the 1.75:1 prints of each of these films, the picture information on the far left and right of the screen was often expendable so that exhibitors could project the 1.75:1 prints in a standard 1.33:1 academy ratio as needed. This is especially noticeable in the main title credits.
Michael Maule, a featured dancer with The New York City Ballet, was originally cast as Charlie Dalrymple, with his songs to be dubbed by John Gustafson. Before filming began he was replaced by Jimmy Thompson but the pre-recordings by Gustafson were kept.
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Gene Kelly wanted Moira Shearer to play the role of Fiona; however, Shearer declined in favor of performing on the classical stage.
Four of the show's musical numbers--"Come to Me, Bend to Me", "There But For You Go I", "From This Day On", and "The Sword Dance"--were filmed and/or recorded but eliminated before the film's release. The sound and picture for three of them are included as extras on the Warner DVD release, but only the audio for "There But For You Go I" has been included.
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In March 1951, Kathryn Grayson was announced in the role eventually played by Cyd Charisse.
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Average Shot Length (ASL) = 32 seconds - about three times as long as most films made during the classical Hollywood era.
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James Mitchell, who originated the role of Harry Beaton on Broadway, was initially scheduled to repeat the part on film; he ultimately chose instead to tour with the Agnes de Mille Dance Theatre.
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"Brigadoon" opened at the Ziegfeld Theater on March 13, 1947, and ran for 581 performances.
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