IMDb > 20000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)
20000 Leagues Under the Sea
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20000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954) More at IMDbPro »

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20000 Leagues Under the Sea -- Clip: Giant squid, post
20000 Leagues Under the Sea -- Clip: Permission granted, post
20000 Leagues Under the Sea -- Clip: Under water, post
20000 Leagues Under the Sea -- Clip: Ship attacked, post

Overview

User Rating:
7.2/10   18,964 votes »
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Up 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Earl Felton (screenplay)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for 20000 Leagues Under the Sea on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
23 December 1954 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Walt Disney's Mighty, Magnificent, Memorable 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea! See more »
Plot:
A ship sent to investigate a wave of mysterious sinkings encounters the advanced submarine, the Nautilus, commanded by Captain Nemo. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won 2 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 4 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(3 articles)
Fincher diving into '20,000 Leagues'
 (From The Hollywood Reporter. 15 May 2010, 7:00 AM, PDT)

Filmmaker Richard Fleischer Dies
 (From WENN. 27 March 2006)

Director Richard Fleischer Dies at 89
 (From WENN. 24 March 2006)

User Reviews:
Production Designer Harper Goff See more (104 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Kirk Douglas ... Ned Land

James Mason ... Captain Nemo

Paul Lukas ... Prof. Pierre Aronnax

Peter Lorre ... Conseil

Robert J. Wilke ... First Mate of the Nautilus

Ted de Corsia ... Capt. Farragut
Carleton Young ... John Howard
J.M. Kerrigan ... Old Billy
Percy Helton ... Coach Driver
Ted Cooper ... Mate on 'Lincoln'
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Chet Brandenburg ... Sailor (uncredited)
John Daheim ... Nautilus Seaman (uncredited)
Jack Gargan ... Reporter from The Post (uncredited)
Harper Goff ... Minister in San Francisco Steam Packet office (uncredited)
Fred Graham ... Casey Moore (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Ticket Agent (uncredited)
Ray Linn Jr. ... Bass-Singing Sailor (uncredited)
Dayton Lummis ... Reporter from The Bulletin (uncredited)
Eddie Marr ... Shipping Agent (uncredited)
Laurie Mitchell ... One of Ned's Girlfriends (uncredited)
T. Monaghan ... Crewman (uncredited)

Ron Nyman ... Sailor (uncredited)

Gloria Pall ... Blonde Girlfriend (uncredited)
Jack Pennick ... Cannon Mate Carson (uncredited)
Robert Robinson ... Sailor (uncredited)
Jack Stoney ... Police Detective (uncredited)
S. Tarnell ... Crewman (uncredited)
Herb Vigran ... Reporter for the Globe (uncredited)
Sailor Vincent ... Sailor (uncredited)

Directed by
Richard Fleischer 
 
Writing credits
Earl Felton (screenplay)

Jules Verne  novel (uncredited)

Produced by
Walt Disney .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Paul J. Smith  (as Paul Smith)
 
Cinematography by
Franz Planer (photographed by)
 
Film Editing by
Elmo Williams 
 
Production Design by
Harper Goff (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
John Meehan 
Harper Goff (uncredited)
 
Set Decoration by
Emile Kuri 
 
Makeup Department
Louis Hippe .... hairdresser (as Lou Hippe)
Louis Hippe .... makeup artist (as Lou Hippe)
Emmy Eckhardt .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Dan Greenway .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
Gustaf Norin .... makeup supervisor (uncredited)
Lillian Rader .... hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Fred Leahy .... production manager
Frederic Leahy .... production supervisor (uncredited)
Ed Ralph .... assistant production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tom Connors Jr. .... assistant director
James Curtis Havens .... second unit director (as James Havens)
Russ Haverick .... assistant director
J. Matane .... second unit director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Bruce Bushman .... sketch artist
Adam John Backauskas .... property maker (uncredited)
Art Cole .... property master: second unit (uncredited)
Arden Cripe .... property master (uncredited)
J.C. Delaney .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Juan Esquinta .... painter (uncredited)
Sandy Grace .... lead man (uncredited)
Juan Haquinta .... stand-by painter (uncredited)
John Harris .... stand-by painter (uncredited)
John Hench .... production illustrator (uncredited)
Roland Hill .... interior design consultant: Nautilus (uncredited)
De Nunsic .... painter (uncredited)
James Owens .... assistant property master (uncredited)
Russell Ray .... laborer (uncredited)
Freddie Stoos .... production illustrator (uncredited)
Art Sweet .... laborer (uncredited)
Karl Wiebach .... submarine interior (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Robert O. Cook .... sound recordist
C.O. Slyfield .... sound director
G.R. Danner .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
John Hench .... special effects
Joshua Meador .... special effects (as Josh Meador)
Jim Donnelly .... special effects assistant (uncredited)
Lou Gray .... special effects technician (uncredited)
Robert A. Mattey .... special effects director (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Peter Ellenshaw .... matte artist
Ralph Hammeras .... effects photographer
Ub Iwerks .... special processes
Charles Bovel .... director of photography: visual effects unit (uncredited)
Marcel Delgado .... miniatures (uncredited)
Warren Wray Hamilton .... miniature technician (uncredited)
Andy Lane .... back projection supervisor (uncredited)
Chris Mueller .... model sculptor (uncredited)
Fred Sersen .... visual effects supervisor: second unit (uncredited)
Albert Whitlock .... titles designer (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Norman Bishop .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Ricou Browning .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Joe Canutt .... stunts (uncredited)
John Daheim .... stunt double: James Mason (uncredited)
F. Donahue .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Alfred Hanson .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Stubby Kruger .... stunts (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Carey Loftin .... stunts (uncredited)
Frank McGrath .... stunts (uncredited)
Frank McMann .... stunt double: James Mason (uncredited)
Eddie Parker .... stunt double: Robert J. Wilke (uncredited)
Gil Parker .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Harvey Parry .... stunts (uncredited)
Robert Paulson .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Gil Perkins .... stunt double: Kirk Douglas (uncredited)
Charles Regan .... stunt diver (uncredited)
George Robotham .... stunts (uncredited)
D. Rochlen .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Ed Stepner .... stunts (uncredited)
Jack Sterling .... stunts (uncredited)
Bill Stropahl .... stunt diver (uncredited)
Louis Tomei .... stunts (uncredited)
Dale Van Sickel .... stunts (uncredited)
Carl Vernell .... stunt double: Kirk Douglas (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunt double: Kirk Douglas (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunts (uncredited)
Terry Wilson .... stunts (uncredited)
Fred Zendar .... stunt diver (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Til Gabani .... underwater photographer (as Till Gabbani)
Charles P. Boyle .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Edward Colman .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Tom Eddy .... electrician (uncredited)
John Farrell .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Jim Grady .... electrician (uncredited)
Hadley .... camera grip (uncredited)
Paul Hill .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
Dick Johnson .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Kauffman .... camera technician (uncredited)
James V. King .... camera operator: second unit (uncredited)
F. Bud Mautino .... camera operator (uncredited)
Morris Rosen .... key grip (uncredited)
Charles Russell .... grip (uncredited)
Don Stott .... chief lighting technician (uncredited)
Hal Swanson .... assistant chief lighting technician (uncredited)
Anthony Ugrin .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Norman Martien .... costumer
Harrington .... costume assistant (uncredited)
Herman .... costume assistant (uncredited)
Robert Martien .... wardrobe supervisor (uncredited)
Robert Olivas .... costume assistant (uncredited)
Ottras .... costume assistant (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Joseph Dubin .... orchestrator (as Joseph S. Dubin)
 
Other crew
Walt Disney .... presenter
Harper Goff .... production developer
Morgan Padelford .... Technicolor consultant
Fred Zendar .... diving master
Dick Anderson .... dive equipment master (uncredited)
Elliott Barns .... wrangler (uncredited)
Art Black .... first aid (uncredited)
Dr. Bryan .... first aid (uncredited)
Howard Davis .... assistant production coordinator (uncredited)
Thomas Michael Dyers .... technical advisor (uncredited)
W.F. Fitzgerald .... production coordinator (uncredited)
Hazel George .... first aid (uncredited)
William Hunter .... life guard (uncredited)
Howard Lightbourn .... liaison: Bahamas locations (uncredited)
Howard Lydecker .... consultant (uncredited)
Theodore Lydecker .... consultant (uncredited)
Jack Peterson .... production assistant (uncredited)
Robertson .... liaison: Jamaica (uncredited)
Marvin Weldon .... script supervisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Jules Verne's 20000 Leagues Under the Sea" - UK (complete title), USA (complete title)
"Walt Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" - USA (poster title)
See more »
Runtime:
127 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
4-Track Stereo (RCA Sound Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:PG | Canada:G (Manitoba/Nova Scotia/Quebec) | Canada:F (Ontario) | Canada:G (video rating) | Finland:K-8 (1976) | Finland:K-12 (1955) | France:U | Iceland:L | New Zealand:G | Norway:11 | Peru:PT | Portugal:M/6 | Spain:T | Sweden:15 (original rating) | Sweden:11 (cut) (1966) | Sweden:Btl (cut) (1955) | UK:U (passed with cuts) | UK:U (video rating) (1985) (2002) | USA:Approved (PCA #18972) | USA:G (re-rating) (1970) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This production was so large that Disney had to use facilities at other studios. This included Universal International (exterior sets redressed for the opening scenes) and 20th Century Fox (large exterior tank for the larger models).See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When Captain Nemo and the Professor return from the mines, the skiff is heading in one direction and the sea moves in the opposite direction.See more »
Quotes:
Conseil:Don't forget the cannibals.
Ned Land:Oh, belay the cannibals. He said that to scare us.
See more »
Soundtrack:
Toccata and Fugue in D MinorSee more »

FAQ

Is this the best adaptation on film of a story by Jules Verne?
See more »
24 out of 28 people found the following review useful.
Production Designer Harper Goff, 8 September 1999
Author: Corfman from Antioch, California

Below is a transcript of a hand written letter from Harper Goff in 1974 of which I have a copy which I think might be of interest. This is an unusual comment entry, but I hope you will find this letter a fasinating rare glimpse into the process of creation, and will give a better appreciation of the artistry of the design of the Disney 'Nautilus'. Harper Goff was responsible for the 'look' of the submarine in the Disney Production, along with much of the film's set designs. Enjoy!

Harper Goff writes....

I was assigned the task of getting together a 'true-life' adventure film using some exceptional underwater footage shot in a laboratory aquarium, by Dr. McGinnity of Cal-Tech's Marine Biology lab in Carona Del Mar. Walt (Disney) thought inasmuch as "20,000 L.U.T.S." was in public domain we might do worse than use the title for a current True-Life adventure short subject. Walt went to England and I stayed in Burbank and made a story-board of a live action version of the classic using McGinnity's footage as a sort of ballet episode where Nemo shows Aronax the wonders of the deep. Walt liked the story-board well enough to have me give an 'A.R.I.' (Audience Reaction Inquiry) to a group of exhibitors who were in town. They were enthusiastic and the rest is history.

In motion pictures, the text of a classic like this subject is sacrosanct like the Bible! The 'word' of Jules Verne is not to be made light of, so the duty of the production designer like myself is to take the sometimes arbitary discriptions of the Nautilus as recorded by 'J.V.' and "make it work".

a. Jules Verne while foreseeing brilliantly the atomic submarine of today, did not at that time invent the periscope, the torpedo tube, or sonar. He did not prophesy closed curcut television. According to Verne, if Nemo wanted to see what was going on the surface, he simply poked the glass ports of the conning tower out of the depths and took a direct look. He risked his vessel, himself, and his crew by ramming the enemy at frightening speed. If he wanted to study the marvels of life under the surface, he reclined in his elegent bay window lounge, and passed the hours studying the marine life outside the amazing pressure proof window of his luxurious salon. These items dictated much of the direction of my production designs.

b. Nemo is quoted by Verne as telling Aronax that "I need no coal for my bunkers. I have instead harnessed the very building blocks of the material universe to heat my boilers and drive this craft". No one can doubt Verne meant Atomic Power.

c. It is not sound economics to study and design obviously unnesscessary parts of the Nautilus if it will not appear on screen. The crews quarters were thus unaccounted for. In Verne's original text Nemo from time to time leaves the chart room and steps directly into other diversified areas of the submarine. Directors do not like to slow down the action and clutter up a dramatic moment by showing actors leave a room, lift a hatch, enter another room.

d. At the time Captain Nemo constructed Nautilus on Mysterious Island, the iron riveted ship was the last word in marine construction. I have always thought rivet patterns were beautiful. I wanted no slick shelled moonship to transport Nemo thru the emerald deep and so fought and somehow got my way. On Mysterious Island Nemo had the white hot heat of a volcano to help him build his dreamship, but I am sure that flat iron plates profusely riveted would have been his way. His stock pile of material was always the countless sunken ships uniquely available to him alone. Even the Greek amphora and the works of art that graced his great salon was salvaged from wrecks.

e. The free diving suits - (self-contained) were developed by myself with the assistance of Fred Zender, and exceptionally able underwater man. The helmets were souped-up Japanese pearl diving helmets. We masked the scuba gear, let water into the the helmet, put a breathing tube in our mouth, the clamps on our nose and one night in 1952 Freddie and I walked slowly from the shallow end to the deep end of the Santa Monica pool. Lead around our middle and 16 lbs. shoes...it worked! Many had predicted failure. This formed the basis of the suits that appeared in the film. We spent 9 hrs. a day, 7 days a week for 8 weeks at Lyford Key in the Bahamas, underwater! Never lost a man, Fred was in charge of safety.

f. 20,000 Leagues was the second cinemascope picture to go into production. Fox had the worldrights to the anamorphic lenses developed by a French inventor named Cretien. This lense "squeezes" the horizontal dimensions of a scene into half the normal area on a cinema frame. If projected thru an anamorphic projection lense it "unsqueezes" this image and the resulting image is widescreen. Fox had only one lense to lease and this meant that Disney could not shoot miniture set ups while the main action sequences were before the cameras. I hit upon the idea of having the prop miniature shop build a "squeezed" Nautilus miniature. The model was built half as wide and half as long, but just as high. Even the rivets were "squeezed". This one miniature was shot with a normal lense. If care was taken to insure the Nautilus remained on an even keel, the resulting footage was more than adequate. When "unsqueezed" by anamorphic projection, the image of the Nautilus was stretched to normal proportions. Of course the bubbles looked strange, but no one seemed to mind. The success of this experiment made it possible for the special effects department to make its necessary footage of many of the underwater miniatures simultaniously with principal photography of the actors.

g. My idea has always been that the shark and the aligator were the most terrifying monsters living in the water. I there for combined the scary eyes of the aligator that can watch you even when it is nearly submerged....with the dangerous pointed nose and menacing dorsal fin - its sleek streamlining and its distinctive tail. The discusting rough skin of the aligator is well simulated by the rivets. As Verne insists that the Nautilus drove its way clean threw it's victim, I designed a protective sawtooth spline that started forward at the bulb of the ram and slid around all outjutting structures of the hull. These included the conning tower, the diving planes, and the great helical propellor at the stern.

Sincerely,

Harper Goff

Artist and Production Designer Harper Goff's film credits include 'Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, 'Fantastic Voyage', 'The Vikings', 'The Great Locomotive Chase', and Disney's '20,000 Leagues Under the Sea'. Mr Goff died March 3, 1993 at his home in Palm Springs at the age of 81.

Corfman

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They should remake it... bdunlap-2
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