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Robert Vaughn dies, aged 83

Tony Sokol Nov 12, 2016

Robert Vaughn, who played the suave spy Napoleon Solo on The Man from U.N.C.L.E., had died.

Sad news. Robert Vaughn died this morning, November 11, of acute leukemia at the age of 83, the veteran actor’s manager Matthew Sullivan announced through Variety. Vaughn died in New York “surrounded by his family,” Sullivan said.

Robert Vaughn is best known in his signature role as Napoleon Solo on The Man From U.N.C.L.E., but he is also the proud gunfighter who painfully scratches his nose against the slate wall in his last battle in The Magnificent Seven.

David McCallum, who played Vaughn’s Russian spy partner on The Man From Uncle, told TVLine.com he was "utterly devastated. … Robert and I worked together for many years and losing him is like losing a part of me. My deepest sympathies go out to Linda and the Vaughn family."

Vaughn was born in New York City.
See full article at Den of Geek »

R.I.P. Robert Vaughn (1932 – 2016)

American actor Robert Vaughn – best known for his role as Napoleon Solo in The Man from U.N.C.L.E. – has passed away aged 83 following a battle with leukemia.

Born in New York City, Vaughn made his acting debut in 1955 with a guest role in Medic, the first of over two hundred TV roles, which included the hit 60s spy series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., 1970s detective series The Protectors, and the 80s classic The A-Team. In more recent years, he appeared in the British drama Hustle, along with the soap opera Coronation Street.

In addition to his TV work, Vaughn also appeared in a number of notable feature films, including an Academy Award-nominated turn in The Young Philadelphians, as well as The Magnificent Seven, Bullitt, The Towering Inferno, S.O.B. and Superman III.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Reel Ink Number 1 Nov/Dec 2012: Part 2

  • HeyUGuys
The second part of the first Reel Ink round-up of recent books on film includes the biography of a sometime Hollywood rebel, the history of a now forgotten British studio, a look at a film that remains one of the most controversial ever made in the UK, and a hugely compelling history of cinema by the great David Thomson.

Time was against me so I haven’t been able to get through all the reading goodness I’ve acquired in the past eight weeks or so, but I’ll catch up in January. Happy New Year!

It’s official: Dennis Hopper was an unrepentant douchebag off screen as well as on. The predominant impression that Peter L. Winkler’s Dennis Hopper: The Wild Ride of A Hollywood Rebel (The Robson Press) leaves one with is that Hopper was a deluded, misogynistic gasbag, a moderate talent who likely suffered from
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Leading Actor Dennis Hopper is Dead

Dennis Hopper’s long film career began with the 1955 teen angst classic Rebel Without a Cause with James Dean, and he helped usher in Hollywood’s New Wave as director and star of the counterculture anthem Easy Rider in 1969. He later became a respected character actor, specializing in such off-beat villains as the drug-addicted, obscenity-spouting Frank Black in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet (1986), crazed bomber Howard Payne in the 1994 action-thriller Speed with Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock, and Deacon in Kevin Costner’s soggy post-apocalyptic saga Waterworld (1995).

Hopper was born in Dodge City, Kansas on May 17, 1936. He moved to San Diego, California with his family in the late 1940s, and began studying at the local Old Globe Theater while attending high school. He soon signed with Warner Brothers and was featured in a small role in 1955’s Rebel Without a Cause. He was later featured as Jordan Benedict III, the
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Hopper Dead At 74

Hopper Dead At 74
Screen legend Dennis Hopper has died at the age of 74.

The Easy Rider star revealed his fight with prostate cancer in October after being hospitalised for "severe flu-like symptoms", admitting he was first diagnosed with the disease in 2002.

Hopper underwent regular treatment sessions at the University of Southern California, but reports surfaced in early January suggesting he was facing his final days after learning the deadly disease had spread to his bones.

He passed away on Saturday morning at his home in Venice, California with his family and friends at his bedside.

Hopper's manager Sam Maydew confirmed the sad news in a statement to the Afp.

The statement reads, "Dennis Hopper died this morning at 8:15 am (15:15 pm GMT) from complications of metastasized prostate cancer. He died at home in Venice surrounded by family and friends."

Tributes to the actor have been pouring in, with Hopper's Easy Rider co-star Peter Fonda among the first to pay his respects.

He tells TMZ.com, "Dennis introduced me to the world of Pop Art and 'lost' films. We rode the highways of America and changed the way movies were made in Hollywood. I was blessed by his passion and friendship."

A number of stars have taken to Twitter.com to honour Hopper including rocker Slash, who writes, "You take the great ones for granted until they're gone. Rip Dennis Hopper," while British actor Simon Pegg, adds, "Just heard we lost Dennis Hopper at 74. Great actor, sad loss. 'Sometimes he goes too far. He's the first one to admit it. ' Apocalypse Now."

Born in Kansas in 1936, Hopper enjoyed a career as an artist, actor and director spanning 55 years. His family relocated to California when he was a child and, after developing an interest in acting, Hopper made his TV debut with a small role in U.S. series Medic in 1955.

He went on to land two roles alongside his idol James Dean - in 1950s releases Rebel Without a Cause and Giant - but Hopper was left devastated when the movie star was killed in a car accident in 1955, aged just 24.

After moving to the East Coast and completing a training course at New York's famous Actors Studio, Hopper's career began to pick up pace and he became a TV regular on U.S. shows such as The Defenders, Bonanza, The Legend of Jesse James and Combat!

Hopper made brief appearances in Paul Newman's Cool Hand Luke and alongside John Wayne in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965) and True Grit (1969), while his more recognised roles include Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), Out of the Blue (1980) and Rumble Fish (1983).

But Hopper will perhaps be best remembered for pulling double duty on 1969's Easy Rider, which he directed and starred in alongside Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

The movie earned Hopper critical acclaim, but his screen success was marred by trouble in his personal life - the star's eight-year marriage to first wife Brooke Hayward crumbled and he struggled with drug and alcohol abuse.

A year later, in 1970, Hopper rushed to wed Michelle Phillips - the disastrous union lasted just one week amid allegations of cocaine addiction and spousal abuse.

His private life hit the headlines again in the early 1980s when Hopper had a brush with death in an incident involving 17 sticks of dynamite near Houston, Texas, and it was only after finding himself stranded in a Mexican desert while drunk and on drugs that he checked himself into rehab in 1983.

Hopper kicked his addictions and marked his Hollywood comeback with critically acclaimed performances in 1986's Blue Velvet, with director David Lynch, Hoosiers, for which he earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination, and 1988's Colors.

He returned to TV on numerous occasions and in 2002 appeared in Kiefer Sutherland's hit show 24, as well as government drama E-Ring in 2005, and Crash in 2008 to 2009, a series based on the Oscar-winning movie of the same name.

Hopper went down in movie history when he was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in March, but his health had deteriorated so rapidly he was in a wheelchair for his red carpet appearance.

His marriage to fifth wife Victoria Duffy, who he wed in 1996, also deteriorated in his final months - the actor filed for divorce in January, citing irreconcilable differences. He obtained a restraining order against her after his doctor claimed she was "hampering his cancer care" and Hopper's personal assistant, Emily Davis, went on to accuse Duffy of "trying to kill" the ailing star - although no further details were released.

The estranged couple was subsequently ordered to resolve their differences for the sake of their daughter Galen, who was born in 2003, and in April Hopper was forced to pay Duffy $12,000 (£7,500)-a-month in spousal and child support.

Hopper is also survived by his three other children from previous marriages. The actor fathered Marin with first wife Hayward in 1962; Ruthanna with Daria Halprin in the early 1970s, and son Henry, born in 1990, with Katherine Lanasa.

Hopper Dead At 74

Hopper Dead At 74
Screen legend Dennis Hopper has died at the age of 74.

The Easy Rider star revealed his fight with prostate cancer in October after being hospitalised for "severe flu-like symptoms", admitting he was first diagnosed with the illness in 2002.

Hopper underwent regular treatment sessions at the University of Southern California, but reports surfaced in early January suggesting he was facing his final days after learning the deadly disease had spread to his bones.

He passed away on Saturday morning at his home in Venice, California with his family and friends at his bedside.

Hopper's manager Sam Maydew confirmed the sad news in a statement to the Afp.

The statement reads, "Dennis Hopper died this morning at 8:15 am (15:15 pm GMT) from complications of metastasized prostate cancer. He died at home in Venice surrounded by family and friends."

Tributes to the actor have been pouring in, with Hopper's Easy Rider co-star Peter Fonda among the first to pay his respects.

He tells TMZ.com, "Dennis introduced me to the world of Pop Art and 'lost' films. We rode the highways of America and changed the way movies were made in Hollywood. I was blessed by his passion and friendship."

A number of stars have taken to Twitter.com to honour Hopper including rocker Slash, who writes, "You take the great ones for granted until they're gone. Rip Dennis Hopper," while British actor Simon Pegg, adds, "Just heard we lost Dennis Hopper at 74. Great actor, sad loss. 'Sometimes he goes too far. He's the first one to admit it. ' Apocalypse Now."

Born in Kansas in 1936, Hopper enjoyed a career as an artist, actor and director spanning 55 years. His family relocated to California when he was a child and, after developing an interest in acting, Hopper made his TV debut with a small role in U.S. series Medic in 1955.

He went on to land two roles alongside his idol James Dean - in 1950s releases Rebel Without a Cause and Giant - but Hopper was left devastated when the movie star was killed in a car accident in 1955, aged just 24.

After moving to the East Coast and completing a training course at New York's famous Actors Studio, Hopper's career began to pick up pace and he became a TV regular on U.S. shows such as The Defenders, Bonanza, The Legend of Jesse James and Combat!

Hopper made brief appearances in Paul Newman's Cool Hand Luke and alongside John Wayne in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965) and True Grit (1969), while his more recognised roles include Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now (1979), Out of the Blue (1980) and Rumble Fish (1983).

But Hopper will perhaps be best remembered for pulling double duty on 1969's Easy Rider, which he directed and starred in alongside Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

The movie earned Hopper critical acclaim, but his screen success was marred by trouble in his personal life - the star's eight-year marriage to first wife Brooke Hayward crumbled and he struggled with drug and alcohol abuse.

A year later, in 1970, Hopper rushed to wed Michelle Phillips - the disastrous union lasted just one week amid allegations of cocaine addiction and spousal abuse.

His private life hit the headlines again in the early 1980s when Hopper had a brush with death in an incident involving 17 sticks of dynamite near Houston, Texas, and it was only after finding himself stranded in a Mexican desert while drunk and on drugs that he checked himself into rehab in 1983.

Hopper kicked his addictions and marked his Hollywood comeback with critically acclaimed performances in 1986's Blue Velvet, with director David Lynch, Hoosiers, for which he earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination, and 1988's Colors.

He returned to TV on numerous occasions and in 2002 appeared in Kiefer Sutherland's hit show 24, as well as government drama E-Ring in 2005, and Crash in 2008 to 2009, a series based on the Oscar-winning movie of the same name.

Hopper went down in movie history when he was honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in March, but his health had deteriorated so rapidly he was in a wheelchair for his red carpet appearance.

His marriage to fifth wife Victoria Duffy, who he wed in 1996, also deteriorated in his final months - the actor filed for divorce in January, citing irreconcilable differences. He obtained a restraining order against her after his doctor claimed she was "hampering his cancer care" and Hopper's personal assistant, Emily Davis, went on to accuse Duffy of "trying to kill" the ailing star - although no further details were released.

The estranged couple was subsequently ordered to resolve their differences for the sake of their daughter Galen, who was born in 2003, and in April Hopper was forced to pay Duffy $12,000 (£7,500)-a-month in spousal and child support.

Hopper is also survived by his three other children from previous marriages. The actor fathered Marin with first wife Hayward in 1962; Ruthanna with Daria Halprin in the early 1970s, and son Henry, born in 1990, with Katherine Lanasa.

Obituary: Dennis Hopper

Obituary: Dennis Hopper
Dennis Hopper was born on May 17, 1936 in Dodge City, Kansas. His career as an actor began in an episode of Richard Boone television series Medic in 1955, portraying a young epileptic. During the same year, he was cast with James Dean in Rebel Without A Cause, and a year later he worked alongside Dean again in Giant. He then played supporting roles in The Sons of Katie Elder and True Grit, which both starred John Wayne. Hopper's big break came when he co-wrote, directed and starred in cult movie Easy Rider in 1969, for which he received an Academy Award nomination for 'Best Original Screenplay'. After a quiet period during the 1970s, Hopper won attention for Apocalypse Now in 1979, and garnered another Oscar nomination for 'Best Supporting Actor' in 1986 basketball film Hoosiers. He then gave critically-acclaimed (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Dennis Hopper RIP

Dennis Hopper RIP
Hollywood has lost a real legend today with the passing of Dennis Lee Hopper at the age of 74. The man still best known for making Easy Rider enjoyed a long and varied career in the entertainment industry, appearing on screens big and small, as well as numerous stage productions. He was also a prolific artist, working with photography, sculpture and paint.Born in Dodge City, Kansas, Hopper developed an early fascination with acting, and, after his family moved to San Diego when he was 13, he began to perform in high school. He would go on to study at the Old Globe theatre in San Diego.His first proper credit came on TV, in an episode of the series Medic in 1955, and he was soon winning guest starring roles on a variety of shows, though that didn’t stop him from making the job to movies. Few actors can claim such
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Dennis Hopper dies at 74

Dennis Hopper dies at 74
Dennis Hopper, who personified Hollywood rebellion, both on screen and off, died Saturday at his home in Venice, Ca. after a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 74.

Having made his big screen debut in 1955's iconic "Rebel Without a Cause," opposite his friend James Dean, Hopper biked to fame as director/co-writer and finger-flashing cyclist, along with Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson, in 1969's "Easy Rider." That movie, which was embraced by the burgeoning youth culture, signaled a generational change in Hollywood and also earned Hopper a best original screenplay Oscar nomination, which he shared with Hopper and Terry Southern.

He was also nominated for an Oscar for his performance as an alcoholic high school basketball coach in 1986's "Hoosiers."

Hopper, like many of the characters he played early in his career, was known for his sometimes anarchic off-screen moves and drug use in the first half of his life.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Dennis Hopper Defeated by Prostate Cancer

Acting legend Dennis Hopper is losing his battle with prostate cancer after the deadly disease spread to his bones, according to a British report. The "Easy Rider" veteran revealed his struggle with the illness in October 2009, after he was admitted to hospital suffering from "severe flu-like symptoms."

He immediately underwent treatment at the University of Southern California, but doctors admit hopes for the 73 year old are fading after the cancer spread, according to Britain's News of the World newspaper. According to the publication, medics have informed Hopper - who has battled the disease since 2002 - that his cancer is incurable and that he may be facing his final days.

Dennis Hopper made his acting debut in 1955 when he portrayed a young epileptic in TV series called "Medic". Some other movies that the 74-year-old actor has played included "Legacy", "Land of the Dead", "Sleepwalking" and "An American Carol".
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Cinema Retro Presents Monte Hellman: The Lost Interview

  • CinemaRetro
As Cinema Retro 'regulars' know, we have occasionally been able to find unpublished or rarely-seen interviews with legendary film personalities and provide them for our readers. In issue #1 of the magazine, Steve Mori provided an unseen interview Steve McQueen from 1968 and in issue #15, Steve did the same with a fascinating 1974 discussion with Lee Marvin. Now contributing writer Kris Gilpin has been kind enough to share with us with a 1988 interview with director Monte Hellman, whose work is revered by some of the great directors of our time. Please keep in mind that the text and events that are discussed in this interview took place in 1988 and have not been amended. (This is part one of a two-part interview.)

Interview With Monte Hellman

By Kris Gilpin

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Born July 12th, 1932 in New York City, writer-director Monte Hellman’s work is miles above typical American
See full article at CinemaRetro »

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