IMDb > Tokyo Story (1953)
Tôkyô monogatari
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Tokyo Story (1953) More at IMDbPro »Tôkyô monogatari (original title)

Photos (See all 16 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
8.3/10   19,450 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 14% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Kôgo Noda (scenario) and
Yasujirô Ozu (scenario)
Contact:
View company contact information for Tokyo Story on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
13 March 1972 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
An old couple visit their children and grandchildren in the city; but the children have little time for them. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins See more »
NewsDesk:
(172 articles)
The Summer of Eyes Wide Shut
 (From MUBI. 18 July 2014, 6:47 AM, PDT)

Will Samuel L. Jackson Return for 'Die Hard 6'?
 (From MovieWeb. 14 April 2014, 6:46 PM, PDT)

Tsr Exclusive: ‘The Raid 2: Berandal’ Interview with Actor Iko Uwais
 (From Scorecard Review. 4 April 2014, 6:00 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Ozu's Quietly Brilliant Masterpiece Deserves Your Attention See more (109 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Chishû Ryû ... Shukishi Hirayama
Chieko Higashiyama ... Tomi Hirayama

Setsuko Hara ... Noriko Hirayama
Haruko Sugimura ... Shige Kaneko

Sô Yamamura ... Koichi Hirayama
Kuniko Miyake ... Fumiko Hirayama - his wife
Kyôko Kagawa ... Kyôko Hirayama
Eijirô Tôno ... Sanpei Numata
Nobuo Nakamura ... Kurazo Kaneko
Shirô Osaka ... Keizo Hirayama
Hisao Toake ... Osamu Hattori
Teruko Nagaoka ... Yone Hattori
Mutsuko Sakura ... Oden-ya no onna
Toyo Takahashi ... Rinka no saikun (as Toyoko Takahashi)
Tôru Abe ... Tetsudou-shokuin
Sachiko Mitani ... Aparto no onna
Zen Murase ... Minoru Hirayama - Koichi's son
Mitsuhiro Môri ... Isamu Hirayama - Koichi's son
Junko Anan ... Biyouin no joshu
Ryôko Mizuki ... Biyouin no kyaku
Yoshiko Togawa ... Biyouin no kyaku
Kazuhiro Itokawa ... Geshuku no seinen
Fumio Tooyama ... Kanka no otoko (as Fumio Toyama)
Keijirô Morozumi ... Junsa
Tsutomu Nijima ... Noriko's office boss
Shôzô Suzuki ... Jimuin
Yoshiko Tashiro ... Ryokan no jochuu
Haruko Chichibu ... Ryokan no jochuu
Takashi Miki ... Tuyauta-shi
Binnosuke Nagao ... Onomichi no ishi
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Yasujirô Ozu 
 
Writing credits
Kôgo Noda (scenario) and
Yasujirô Ozu (scenario)

Produced by
Takeshi Yamamoto .... producer
 
Original Music by
Takanobu Saito 
 
Cinematography by
Yûharu Atsuta 
 
Film Editing by
Yoshiyasu Hamamura 
 
Production Design by
Tatsuo Hamada 
 
Art Direction by
Tatsuo Hamada 
 
Costume Design by
Taizô Saitô 
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Osamu Takahashi .... assistant director
Kouzou Yamamoto .... assistant director
Shôhei Imamura .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Setsutarô Moriya .... set dresser
Toshio Takahashi .... set designer
 
Sound Department
Yoshiomi Hori .... sound assistant
Mitsuru Kaneko .... sound engineer
Yoshisaburô Senoo .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Takashi Kawamata .... assistant camera
Itsuo Takashita .... lighting technician
Takeshi Yakuwa .... lighting assistant
 
Editorial Department
Ryûji Hayashi .... colorist
 
Other crew
Tomiji Shimizu .... script supervisor
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Tôkyô monogatari" - Japan (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
136 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Voted #7 in Total Film's 100 Greatest Movies Of All Time list (November 2005).See more »
Quotes:
Kyoko:Isn't life disappointing?
Noriko:[smiles] Yes, it is.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Youth in Revolt (2009)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
93 out of 101 people found the following review useful.
Ozu's Quietly Brilliant Masterpiece Deserves Your Attention, 12 December 2005
Author: Ed Uyeshima from San Francisco, CA, USA

I think this movie is amazing for reasons I was not expecting. I had heard of Yasujiro Ozu's "Tokyo Story" for several years but never had an opportunity to see it until Criterion resuscitated it as part of their DVD collection. Over fifty years old, this wondrous 1953 film resonates just as deeply today. Those outside Japan rarely get to see a Japanese film classic that doesn't involve samurai warriors in medieval battles. This one, however, is a subtly observed family drama set in post-WWII Japan, and it is the quietude and lack of pretense of Ozu's film-making style that makes this among the most moving of films.

The plot centers on Shukishi and Tomi, an elderly couple, who traverse the country from their southern fishing village of Onomichi to visit their adult children, daughter Shige and son Koichi, in Tokyo. Leading their own busy lives, the children realize their obligation to entertain them and pack them off to Atami, a nearby resort targeted to weekend revelers. Returning to Tokyo unexpectedly, Tomi visits their kindly daughter-in-law, Noriko, the widow of second son Shoji, while Shukishi gets drunk with some old companions. The old couple realizes they have become a burden to their children and decide to return to Onomichi. They also have a younger daughter Kyoko, a schoolteacher who lives with them, and younger son Keizo works for the train company in Osaka. By now the children, except for Kyoko and the dutiful Noriko, have given up on their parents, even when Tomi takes ill in Osaka on the way back home. From this seemingly convoluted, trivial-sounding storyline, fraught with soap opera possibilities, Ozu has fashioned a heartfelt and ultimately ironic film that focuses on the details in people's lives rather than a single dramatic situation.

What fascinates me about Ozu's idiosyncratic style is how he relies on insinuation to carry his story forward. In fact, some of the more critical events happen off-camera because Ozu's simple, penetrating observations of these characters' lives remain powerfully insightful without being contrived. Ozu scholar David Desser, who provides insightful commentary on the alternate audio track, explains this concept as "narrative ellipses", Ozu's singularly effective means of providing emotional continuity to a story without providing all the predictable detail in between. Ozu also positions his camera low throughout his film to replicate the perspective of someone sitting on a tatami mat. It adds significantly to the humanity he evokes. There are no melodramatic confrontations among the characters, no masochistic showboating, and the dialogue is deceptively casual, as even the most off-hand remark bears weight into the story. The film condemns no one and its sense of inevitability carries with it only certain resigned sadness. What amazes me most is how the ending is so cathartic because the characters feel so real to me, not because there are manipulative plot developments, even death, which force me to feel for them.

I just love the performances, as they have a neo-realism that makes them all the more affecting. Chishu Ryu and Chieko Higashiyama are wonderfully authentic as Shukishi and Tomi, perfectly conveying the resignation they feel about their lives and their children without slipping into cheap sentimentality. Higashiyama effortlessly displays the sunny demeanor of a grandmother, so when sadness does take over in her life, it becomes all the more haunting. In particular, she has a beautiful scene where Tomi looks forlornly at her grandchild wondering what he will be when he grows up and whether she will live to see what happens. Even more heartbreaking is the scene where Shukishi and Tomi sit in Ueno Park realizing their children have no time for them and are resigned to the fact that they need to find a place to sleep for the night. The closest the film has to a villain is Shige, portrayed fearlessly by Haruko Sugimura, who is able to show respect, pettiness and conniving in a realistically mercurial fashion. Watch her as she complains about the expensive cakes her husband bought for her parents (as she selfishly eats them herself) or how she finagles Koichi to co-finance the trip to Atami or how she shows her frustration when her parents come home early from the spa. So Yamamura (familiar to later Western audiences as Admiral Yamamoto in "Tora! Tora! Tora!") displays the right amount of indifference as Koichi, and Kyoko Kagawa has a few sharp lines toward the end of the film as the disappointed Kyoko.

But the best performance comes from the legendary Setsuko Hara, a luminous actress whose beauty and sensitivity remind me of Olivia de Havilland during the same era. As Noriko, she is breathtaking in showing her character's modesty, her unforced generosity in spite of her downscale status and her constant smile as a mask for her pain. She has a number of deeply affecting moments, for instance, when Noriko explains to Shukishi and Tomi how she misses her husband, even though it is implied he was a brutalizing alcoholic; or the touching goodbye to Kyoko; or her pained embarrassment over the high esteem that Shukishi holds for her kindness. Don't expect fireworks or any shocking moments, just a powerfully emotional film in spite of its seemingly modest approach. The two-disc DVD set has the commentary from Desser on the first disc, as well as the trailer. On the second disc, there are two excellent documentaries. One is a comprehensive 1983, two-hour feature focused on Ozu's life and career, and the second is a 40-minute tribute from several international movie directors.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (109 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Tokyo Story (1953)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
The Godfather lynda618
Tokyo Story or Ikiru ltvx
What Criterions Do U Own webuiltthiscityonrockand
Bored me to death dubbayewdubbayew
imdb top 250 mjlangenbru
Blu Ray jaylucillo
See more »

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb Japan section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.