Stalag 17
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Stalag 17 (1953) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 37 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Toy Story 3 Blu-ray Review

29 October 2010 8:45 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Every filmmaker stumbles from time to time. Even the greats like Hitchcock and Kubrick have a few boners in their pantheon, along with other movies that do the job and not much more. Part of the ballyhoo over Pixar stems from the fact that they alone seem to have avoided that trap. Everything they produce stands head and shoulders above its competitors, throwing off the filmmaking curve like a genius in remedial English class. At worst, their efforts are pretty good, and at best? Well, at best they produce movies like Toy Story 3. Hit the jump for my full review.

The original Toy Story set Pixar on its winning ways back in 1995, and the first sequel achieved that rare feat of surpassing the original in depth and quality. Toy Story 3 picks up after a ten-year break… rarely a good sign in any franchise. But John Lasseter’s boys »

- Rob Vaux

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Club Picks: Nosferatu, Trancers, and Stalag 17

23 June 2010 4:15 PM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Whether you're itching for a classic, or something you've never seen, the Movie Clubs have got you covered:

Brian Salisbury opted to go mega-classic for Horror Squad and tackled the iconic Nosferatu. New to the film, he raves about Murnau's tricks, noting: "I know it sounds ridiculous to label a film from 1922 as cutting edge, but given the limitations of the era, it really is. I'll start with the simplest example; so subtle it probably went unnoticed. Murnau actually uses transitions between shots. In the early days of filmmaking, this was nearly unheard of."

Meanwhile, over at SciFi Squad, Micah Matthews delved into the wonder of Trancers. He wrote: "The opening scenes, which were set in 2247, depicted the type of future that I really enjoy: one that is ugly and beaten down and based on current tech... but with just a splash of futuristic innovations."

Finally, I went Wilder and »

- Monika Bartyzel

Permalink | Report a problem


Cinematical Movie Club: Stalag 17

18 June 2010 7:48 PM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

I'd been meaning to see Stalag 17 for years. In my teens I'd inherited a behemoth laser disc player and a pile of discs that outlined my grandmother and grandfather's cinematic tastes. His pile was mostly war films; he'd been in Europe during the second World War, and had escape two camps himself, while his father spent the war in an Oflag. Due to my family's history, Stalag 17 was always my first choice disc to play. But the player was wonky and wouldn't play the sound properly, and I'd never gotten around to picking up a different copy of the film, until a fellow Twitter follower re-inspired my push to see it.

At first, I was nervous. Billy Wilder's comedy had been built up for years, references to it popping up everywhere -- even on Gilmore Girls. Could it live up to my ever-increasing expectations? Either way, the time had come. »

- Monika Bartyzel

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Club Picks: Vampires, Starship Troopers, and People Pies

15 June 2010 4:46 PM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

There's all sorts of horror in this week's gang of movie club picks, just waiting for your .02:

2002's Blade 2 brought Guillermo del Toro into the fold, and over at Horror Squad, Mike Moody writes that the filmmaker "f*cked with the formula of the first Blade movie just enough to create a fun, surprising, and endlessly gruesome action-horror mashup with Blade II. I recognize that this flick isn't nearly as good as most of the genre classics we like to celebrate here at Hs, but it's one of my favorite vampire action movies of all time. It's also one of del Toro's most sophisticated efforts, packing top of the line production values, makeup and special effects."

Meanwhile, Brad McHargue dipped into space bugs and tackled Starship Troopers for SciFi Squad. He writes: "Starship Troopers is widely considered to be a guilty pleasure among fans, though I don't really see »

- Monika Bartyzel

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review: Saving Private Ryan

31 May 2010 10:45 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

One of these days, when I've had more experience, I will have to sit down and make a list of top ten World War II films. Would Saving Private Ryan make the list? Before you answer take a look at this list of films: From Here to Eternity, Au Revoir, Les Enfants, The Thin Red Line, Schindler's List, Casablanca, Stalag 17, The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Dirty Dozen, Mrs. Miniver, Patton, The Big Red One, The Great Escape, Das Boot, The Train, The Best Years of Our Lives, The Guns of Navarone, The Longest Day, A Walk In the Sun, The Pianist, Europa, Europa, The Diary of Anne Frank and To Hell and Back.

Obviously, just asking whether or not Saving Private Ryan would make a top ten list of WWII films means it's pretty damned good and Paramount's Blu-ray release of the film serves to verify that. »

- Brad Brevet

Permalink | Report a problem


Did You Know? The Dark Knight

19 May 2010 2:37 PM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

Hey everyone, my name's Matt and I'm a new writer here at Film Junk. This is a new column that I'm going to be starting where every once in a while I'll give you a couple film facts that you probably never knew. Hopefully you'll find them interesting and it will spark discussion. This edition of Did You Know will feature the movie The Dark Knight. Fact #1: Remember in the movie those videos that the Joker sends to the Gcn? The first one was about the fake Batman and the second one was where Mike Engel reads the Joker's statement. Those were both directed by Heath Ledger. The first one Nolan supervised but for the second he gave Heath complete freedom. Discussion: Who knew Heath could direct? It's a shame he passed away so unexpectedly, perhaps in the future he could have tried his hand at directing a full feature length movie. »

- Matt

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Oscar-Winning ‘The Secret in Their Eyes’ Director Juan José Campanella

21 April 2010 10:10 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – And the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film goes to…”The Secret in Their Eyes,” Argentinian director Juan José Campanella’s complex, compelling and political treatise on facing the demons and ghosts of the past.

Set in Argentina, The Secret in Their Eyes stars Ricardo Darin as Benjamin, a retired public attorney whose last request from the office involves a file regarding an unsolved case from the 1970s. Told in flashback, it was Benjamin who was responsible for the prosecution in the murder of a innocent newlywed bride. A new minted attorney in his office at the time, Irene (Soledad Villamil), works on the investigation as well, and her relationship with Benjamin plays out both in the past and present. As the mystery begins to provide answers, the truth could cleanse the sins of the past.

Juan José Campanella, after a emigrating to New York City from Argentina, has »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


The Dawn Of Brando: Richard Erdman Remembers The Men

23 March 2010 12:34 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

(Actor Richard Erdman, left)

by Jon Zelazny

The craft of acting in the 20th century breaks neatly into two distinct phases: before Marlon Brando and after Marlon Brando. He first conquered Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire in 1947. Three years later—and sixty years ago—he made his first movie.

The Men (1950) is a grim drama set in a Va paraplegic ward. Brando is the bitter new arrival; Jack Webb and Richard Erdman play the patients who become his best buddies.

A native of Enid, Oklahoma, Erdman spent his teenage years in vaudeville, and began his Hollywood career in 1944. He most recently appeared on the NBC series "Community."

Richard Erdman: Brando and I went out to Birmingham General Hospital in Van Nuys, where all the war paraplegics were still being treated, and we stayed there a few days, learning how to use wheelchairs, and how to get in and »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


HeyUGuys IMDb250 Project Wk9 – War Films

22 March 2010 2:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The war film. One of the most common subjects for movies over the last century, and for good reason. Wars are very much a part of our history, and to understand and come to terms with such events, it is necessary to explore them fully.

It is no surprise then that there are numerous war movies in the IMDb250 list. They cover several different wars, looking at various elements such as soldier training, battles, prison camps, and the fallout after the war is over. Here are five war movies from the IMDb250 list, and by that definition five of the greatest war movies ever made.

Apocalypse Now (1979) – 8.6 No. 36

Francis Ford Coppola’s epic war film needs no introduction. Considered not just one of the greatest war movies of all time, but one of the greatest movies period. Its production was beleaguered by controversy, rumour, and an increasingly excessive budget. But »

- Barry Steele

Permalink | Report a problem


Peter Graves: 1926-2010

17 March 2010 12:39 PM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Actor Peter Graves was best known for his starring role as Jim Phelps, leader of the Impossible Mission Force, on the popular television drama series Mission: Impossible, from 1967 to 1973.  He took over as star of the series from Steven Hill with the second season. 

Graves was also a leading actor in science fiction films in the 1950s.  He spoke with bible-quoting Martians in the 1952 Cold War thriller Red Planet Mars, and battled bug-eyed aliens in Killers from Space in 1954.  He fended off a creepy Venusian invader in the Roger Corman cult classic It Conquered the World in 1956, and saved the country from gigantic grasshoppers in 1957’s Beginning of the End.

He was born Peter Aurness in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on March 18, 1926.  He served in the United States Army Air Force near the end of World War II. 

He followed his brother, actor and future Gunsmoke star Jim Arness, to Hollywood in the late 1940s, »

- Jesse

Permalink | Report a problem


Mission: Impossible: Peter Graves Dies at 83

16 March 2010 7:18 AM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Beloved actor Peter Graves passed away on Sunday from a heart attack. He had just returned home from having brunch with his family when he collapsed. He was four days shy of celebrating his 84th birthday.

Graves had an interest in performing from an early age and became a radio announcer in Minnesota while still in high school. Following two and a half years in the Air Force, he entered the University of Minnesota as a drama major and played in summer stock.

During his 20s, Graves made his living as a radio actor and then moved to Hollywood where he appeared in movies like Stalag 17, The Night of the Hunter, and The Long Gray Line. He later went on to parody his serious leading man persona in the popular Airplane! movies.

It was on television however that Graves »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Peter Graves' Death, iPad Artwork, And Voodoo Donuts In Today's Twitter Report

15 March 2010 1:01 PM, PDT | MTV Splash Page | See recent MTV Splash Page news »

Original "Mission: Impossible" star and "Airplane!" actor Peter Graves passed away Sunday, and he was beloved by comics and comics/movies tweeters alike. Edgar Wright, Alex Irvine and Jeff Katz, among others, poured out some posts to the first Jim Phelps.

In other chatter, you may be interested to know that not all of the Emerald City ComiCon action took place in Seattle. Though it sounds like an epic "Rock Band" competition was held by Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction, Brian Michael Bendis and Wil Wheaton, the convention was followed by some Voodoo Donut action in Portland. Check out who hit the place up after the jump along with iPad expectations from Jim Lee and Mitch Breiweiser and some micro-reviews of "The Pacific" on HBO.

It's all in the Twitter Report for March 15th, 2010.

Peter Graves pt. 1: @edgarwright R.I.P. Peter Graves; the original Jim Phelps in Mission Impossible »

- Brian Warmoth

Permalink | Report a problem


Peter Graves obituary

15 March 2010 11:14 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

American actor and star of television's Mission: Impossible who made fun of his image in Airplane!

Despite his long career as a serious actor in dozens of films and television shows, Peter Graves, who has died aged 83, might be most remembered for a role that lampooned his square-jawed, stolid screen persona. As the captain of a plane heading for disaster in the spoof movie Airplane! (1980), Graves got laughs by playing it as straight as his other roles. (Although his roles in a number of trashy, low-budget science fiction movies in the 1950s had produced unintentional laughs.)

Audiences around the world were also familiar with Graves as the tall, gruff, deep-voiced, silver-haired Jim Phelps, head of the Imf (Impossible Missions Force), an elite American espionage group, in the TV series Mission: Impossible (1967-73). He won a Golden Globe in the role in 1971.

The show famously opened with the words: "Your mission, »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


Peter Graves obituary

15 March 2010 11:14 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

American actor and star of television's Mission: Impossible who made fun of his image in Airplane!

Despite his long career as a serious actor in dozens of films and television shows, Peter Graves, who has died aged 83, might be most remembered for a role that lampooned his square-jawed, stolid screen persona. As the captain of a plane heading for disaster in the spoof movie Airplane! (1980), Graves got laughs by playing it as straight as his other roles. (Although his roles in a number of trashy, low-budget science fiction movies in the 1950s had produced unintentional laughs.)

Audiences around the world were also familiar with Graves as the tall, gruff, deep-voiced, silver-haired Jim Phelps, head of the Imf (Impossible Missions Force), an elite American espionage group, in the TV series Mission: Impossible (1967-73). He won a Golden Globe in the role in 1971.

The show famously opened with the words: "Your mission, »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


R.I.P. Peter Graves

15 March 2010 9:29 AM, PDT | ScreenRant.com | See recent Screen Rant news »

Oveur and out. Television and film actor Peter Graves died of a heart attack yesterday at the age of 83. He would have turned 84 this Thursday, and he was in fact celebrating his upcoming birthday with a special family brunch just prior to his death.

Reportedly, Graves collapsed in his driveway upon arriving home, and one of his daughters unsuccessfully attempted to revive him using CPR.

Graves will always be best remembered as the star of TV’s Mission: Impossible, long before Tom Cruise took over the franchise on the big screen. But for me — and many of my generation — the actor is first and foremost Clarence Oveur, captain of the troubled flight in the classic comedy Airplane! He also reprised his role for Airplane 2, but it’s the original film that gave us his most oft-quoted lines, such as the famous query to young Joey, “Have you ever been in a Turkish prison? »

- Christopher Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


Peter Graves, "Mission:impossible" Star, Dead At Age 84

15 March 2010 8:57 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Peter Graves, who became an icon of 1960s TV as the star of Mission:Impossible, collapsed and died at his house from an apparent heart attack yesterday. He was 83 years old. Graves toiled for years as a supporting actor in feature films, having made an impression as a German.spy among American Pows in the 1953 classic Stalag 17. Graves was the star of the popular 1950s TV western series Fury. Both he and his younger brother James Arness, who starred in Gunsmoke, found major success on CBS. Graves played agent Jim Phelps in the hit 1960s spy show Mission: Impossible and the opening of every episode, in which a tape self-destructs after reading him his assignment, remains an iconic aspect of TV history.The role won him a Golden Globe award.  Graves was generally cast as stalwart heroic types, but in the 1980 big screen comedy Airplane! he displayed a deft flair »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Mission: Impossible star Peter Graves dies

15 March 2010 7:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Veteran actor also known for roles in Airplane! and a string of other movies believed to have had heart attack at the age of 83

Peter Graves, best known for his role in the 60s TV spy drama Mission: Impossible as well as the Airplane! films, has died.

Graves passed away on Sunday, just a few days before his 84th birthday, outside his home in Los Angeles, his publicist, Sandy Brokaw, said. Graves was returning from brunch with his wife of nearly 60 years and his family when he had what Graves's doctor believed was a heart attack, Brokaw said.

Graves first gained attention with the 1950s TV series Fury, but remained best known for the role of Jim Phelps, leader of a gang of special agents who battled evil conspirators in TV's Mission: Impossible.

Graves appeared in dozens of films and a handful of television shows in a career of nearly 60 years. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Mission: Impossible star Peter Graves dies

15 March 2010 7:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Peter Graves, best known for his role in the 60s TV spy drama Mission: Impossible as well as the Airplane! films, has died.

Graves passed away on Sunday, just a few days before his 84th birthday, outside his home in Los Angeles, his publicist, Sandy Brokaw, said. Graves was returning from brunch with his wife of nearly 60 years and his family when he had what Graves's doctor believed was a heart attack, Brokaw said.

Graves first gained attention with the 1950s TV series Fury, but remained best known for the role of Jim Phelps, leader of a gang of special agents who battled evil conspirators in TV's Mission: Impossible.

Graves appeared in dozens of films and a handful of television shows in a career of nearly 60 years. »

Permalink | Report a problem


New Shorts: March 15th 2010

15 March 2010 7:11 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

New posters for Toy Story 3, Kick Ass, Predators, Skateland and Just Wright.

Director Antoine Fuqua and Ethan Hawke discuss how the ending to "Brooklyn's Finest" changed between the Sundance premiere last year and the theatrical release version the other week over on MTV News.

"Peter Graves, the original Jim Phelps in both incarnations of the TV series "Mission: Impossible", died of natural causes in Pacific Palisades on Sunday. He was 83. Graves also had memorable roles as a German spy in "Stalag 17" and the rather strangely wired pilot in comedy classic "Airplane"...." ( full details)

"A representative for Joaquin Phoenix has denied a recent claim by "Slumdog Millionaire" sound designer Resul Pookutty that Phoenix will come out of cinematic retirement to star in a film adaptation of Daniel Stashower 's Poe-inspired novel "The Beautiful Cigar Girl"..." ( full details)

"Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life" looks to be getting a release »

- Garth Franklin

Permalink | Report a problem


RIP, Peter Graves

15 March 2010 7:01 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Peter Graves has passed away at the age of 83, just shy of his 84th birthday. According to The Hollywood Reporter, he went out to brunch on Sunday with his wife and kids, and upon returning to the house, collapsed before he could get inside, passing away from an apparent heart attack.

Graves' career started in 1942, with an uncredited role as a bombardier in the Oscar-nominated documentary short Winning Your Wings. And that was only the beginning. Over the next 68 years, he acted in 130 more projects, ending with voice work on this year's video game, Darkstar. His first memorable role came in 1953, when he played Price in the war comedy Stalag 17, but it was his iconic role 14 years later that made him a star -- Imf leader Jim Phelps in Mission: Impossible. But of course, for some of us, there's no better memory of Graves' work than remembering the irreplaceable 1980 spoof Airplane! »

- Monika Bartyzel

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 37 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners