7.7/10
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Little Fugitive (1953)

Not Rated | | Drama, Family | 16 December 1953 (France)
A young boy fears that he shot his older brother, who is only faking. He then runs away to Coney Island, a crowded beach area, and gets money by returning soda bottles for their deposits.

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Richard Brewster ...
Winifred Cushing ...
Jay Williams ...
Will Lee ...
Charlie Moss ...
Tommy DeCanio ...
...
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Storyline

Joey, a young boy, runs away to Coney Island after he is tricked into believing he has killed his older brother. Joey collects glass bottles and turns them into money, which he uses to ride the rides. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

boy | beach | f rated | child | pony | See All (12) »

Taglines:

Morris Engel's all-American classic. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Family

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 December 1953 (France)  »

Also Known As:

The Coney Island Kid  »

Box Office

Budget:

$30,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$9,040 (USA) (1 February 2013)

Gross:

$27,373 (USA) (10 January 2014)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Eddie Manson, a professional harmonica player provided the background music. See more »

Quotes

Harry: Ya shot him Joey. Ya shot your brother!
Charley: Yeah... you shot him Joey
Joey: I didn't! I didn't!
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Connections

Featured in Ruth Orkin: Frames of Life (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

L'estudiantina
(1912) (uncredited)
Music by Emil Waldteufel
Played during the merry-go-round sequence
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User Reviews

 
A Pleasant Little Film
26 December 2005 | by (Syracuse, New York, USA) – See all my reviews

Little Fugitive is a pleasant little film set in a more innocent time. The children that play Joey and Lennie act naturally and are light-years away from the gee-whiz-freckle-faced "kids" that usually inhabit films. There is a documentary, unjudgemental feel to the film, with not an ounce of condescension in the whole film. There are very few adults in the film, and when there are adults, they are presented as slight irritations to the children.

The story concerns two brothers who are forced to spend a weekend together because their single mom has to go an care for her mother. Lennie, the older boy, has to look after little Joey, despite the fact that he wanted to spend his Saturday at Coney Island. Early in the film, Lennie and his friends trick Joey into thinking that he killed his big brother, just to get rid of him. Joey, panic-stricken, runs off and hops on a subway (think 1953--Way Safer) and goes off to Coney Island. It is at this point that the film flexes its creative muscles. great b&w photography, interesting angles, wistful harmonica soundtrack, and a episodic, poetic narrative. Watch this film. its a keeper.


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