Gate of Hell (1953) - News Poster

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Lone Wolf & Cub: the best comic book movie franchise ever?

Craig Lines Apr 5, 2017

Marvel? DC? They have their moments, but how about Shogun Assassin, and in turn, the Lone Wolf & Cub movies?

Like most western viewers, I came to the Lone Wolf & Cub series via Shogun Assassin – a recut/mash-up of the first two movies, trimmed to 90 minutes and dubbed into English by a pair of enterprising Andy Warhol acolytes. It was one of the original 'video nasties' in the UK, banned for years, so highly desirable to a kid like me. And it didn’t disappoint. In fact, it was probably the goriest movie on the list.

While it may seem criminal now to butcher a pair of bona fide Japanese classics and completely change their meaning and tone, Shogun Assassin got away with it by being so vibrant and hyperactive. The inappropriate score is a joyful synthesiser meltdown and the spirited dub goes full-pelt, even if what they
See full article at Den of Geek »

The South-East Asian Individuals that won an Oscar

After the films from the area that won an Oscar, it is time to present the individual awards. As you will see, the winners are many since they have begun netting the golden statue since 1954.

Haing S. Ngor from Cambodia won in 1984 the Oscar for Actor in a Supporting Role, for “The Killing Fields

Miyoshi Umeki from Japan won in 1957 the Oscar for Actress in a Supporting Role, for “Sayonara”.

Ang Lee from Taiwan won twice the Oscar for Best Director, in 2005 for “Brokeback Mountain” and in 2012 for Life of Pi. He was the first Asian to win in this particular category.

Peter Pau from Hong Kong won in 2000 the Oscar for Best Cinematography, for “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”.

Timmy Yip from Hong Kong won in 2000 the Oscar for Best Art Direction, for “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”.

Sanjo Wada from Japan won in 1954 the Oscar for Best Costume Design, for
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The South East-Asian films that won an Oscar

The first successes of Asian films in the Oscars occured during the 50’s, when the award for Foreign-Language Film was not yet introduced and the Academy presented Special/Honorary awards to the best foreign language films released in the United States. Three Japanese productions received these awards during this decade.

1951. Rashomon, by Akira Kurosawa. A priest, a woodcutter and another man are taking refuge from a rainstorm in the shell of a former gatehouse called Rashômon. The priest and the woodcutter are recounting the story of a murdered samurai whose body the woodcutter discovered three days earlier in a forest grove. Both were summoned to testify at the murder trial, the priest who ran into the samurai and his wife traveling through the forest just before the murder occurred.

Three other people who testified at the trial are supposedly the only direct witnesses: a notorious bandit named Tajômaru, who allegedly
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

David Reviews Nagisa Oshima’s Death By Hanging [Criterion Blu-Ray Review]

  • CriterionCast
With the exception of several crowd-pleasing samurai epics (like Zatoichi and Three Outlaw Samurai) and a few bargain-priced historical costume dramas (such as The Ballad of Narayama and Gate of Hell), the flow of newly released Japanese art films by the Criterion Collection has slowed to a trickle over the past five years or so. (And for the sake of politeness and avoiding pointless controversy, I won’t invoke Jellyfish Eyes in this argument either.) We’ve obviously enjoyed a steady stream of chanbara, Ozu and especially Kurosawa Blu-ray upgrades during this past half-decade, and there have been several outstanding Japanese sets recently issued as part of the Eclipse Series as well, but we really haven’t seen much else along these lines in the main lineup since Kaneto Shindo’s Kuroneko came out in the fall of 2011. That’s over 200 spine numbers ago! But I’m happy to report
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Picks on Fandor: Directing in Color

  • CriterionCast
Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on nine films where some of the most famous directors in the Criterion Collection first directed a feature in color.

Saturate yourself in the vivid stylings of some of our favorite directors, wielding a whole new spectrum of expression for the very first time.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

Dodes’ka-den, the Japanese Drama by Akira Kurosawa

The unforgettable Dodes’Ka-den was made at a tumultuous moment in Kurosawa’s life. And all of his hopes, fears and artistic passion are on fervent display in this, his gloriously shot first color film.

Equinox Flower, the Japanese Drama by Yasujirô Ozu

Later in his career, Yasujiro Ozu started becoming
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Forgotten: Spirit Over Substance

  • MUBI
Teinosuke Kinugasa is best-known in the West for Gate of Hell (1953), with its court intrigues in luminous color, and for A Page of Madness (a.k.a. A Page out of Order, 1926), which can be considered as the Japanese Caligari, only with dynamic and disturbing camera movement thrown into the mix, making it seem much more modern and involving that Robert Weine's expressionist classic.

But Kinugasa directed 109 movies by the IMDb's count, and while no doubt many of the silents are now lost, it's a great shame so few of the survivors have had any kind of release outside of their homeland (or even inside their homeland).

Yoso (a.k.a. Bronze Magician, 1963) was Kinugasa's penultimate film, and shows his powers undimmed. In fact, in some sense they could be considered condensed and purified. Japanese cinema takes seriously the principle that each film should exist as a beautiful art object:
See full article at MUBI »

Orc Wars (2013) Movie Trailer: Marine fights Monsters at Gate of Hell

  • Film-Book
Orc Wars Trailer. Kohl GlassOrc Wars (2013) movie trailer, a film co-produced by Mem Ferda, stars Rusty Joiner, Masiela Lusha, Wesley John, Isaac C. Singleton Jr., and Maclain Nelson. Orc Wars‘ plot synopsis: “Orc Wars tells the story of a Marine (John Norton) who buys a ranch in remote [...]

Continue reading: Orc Wars (2013) Movie Trailer: Marine fights Monsters at Gate of Hell
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John D Wilson obituary

Innovative animator whose credits include Lady and the Tramp, Petroushka and Grease

The pioneering animator John David Wilson, who has died aged 93, launched his studio, Fine Arts Films, in 1955 and found success with his first short subject, an adaptation of a Japanese folk tale, Tara the Stonecutter, which was screened in America with Teinosuke Kinugasa's Oscar-winning samurai drama Jigokumon (Gate of Hell, 1953). Next came Petroushka (1956), for which Igor Stravinsky (despite negative feelings towards animation following Disney's Fantasia) was persuaded by Wilson to prepare a shortened score for the film and conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic for the soundtrack. Petroushka won several festival awards and was the first animated film to be accepted by the Venice film festival.

Wilson's diverse productions ranged from innovative TV commercials for Instant Butter-Nut Coffee, made with the actor and humorist Stan Freberg, to a groundbreaking 15-minute film, Journey to the Stars, for the United
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Massive, 50% Off Criterion Collection Blu-ray Sale at Amazon

Amazon is having a massive sale on Criterion Collection titles, virtually all of them listed at 50% off and I have included more than 115 of the available titles directly below along with a selection of ten I consider must owns. Titles beyond my top ten include Amarcord, Christopher Nolan's Following, David Fincher's The Game, Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory and The Killing, Roman Polansk's Rosemary's Baby, Wes Anderson's The Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore and The Darjeeling Limited and plenty of Terrence Malick. All the links lead directly to the Amazon website, so click on through with confidence. Small Note: By buying through the links below you help support RopeofSilicon.com as I get a small commission for the sales made through using these links. Thanks for reading and I appreciate your support. Top Ten Must Owns 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) 12 Angry Men (dir. Sidney Lumet) The 400 Blows (dir.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Massive, 50% Off Criterion Collection Blu-ray Sale at Amazon

Amazon is having a massive sale on Criterion Collection titles, virtually all of them listed at 50% off and I have included more than 115 of the available titles directly below along with a selection of ten I consider must owns. Titles beyond my top ten include Amarcord, Christopher Nolan's Following, David Fincher's The Game, Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory and The Killing, Roman Polansk's Rosemary's Baby, Wes Anderson's The Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore and The Darjeeling Limited and plenty of Terrence Malick. All the links lead directly to the Amazon website, so click on through with confidence. Small Note: By buying through the links below you help support RopeofSilicon.com as I get a small commission for the sales made through using these links. Thanks for reading and I appreciate your support. Top Ten Must Owns 8 1/2 (dir. Federico Fellini) 12 Angry Men (dir. Sidney Lumet) The 400 Blows (dir.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

DVD Review: ‘Gate of Hell’ Gets Extra-Free Criterion Release

Chicago – Beneath every honorable warrior is a cold-hearted opportunist hell-bent on dominating his victimized prey at all costs. That’s a theory indelibly illustrated by Teinosuke Kinugasa’s revered 1953 classic, “Gate of Hell,” a melodrama populated by such frustrating characters that it nearly loses the viewer’s interest before its admittedly splendid finale, when the tale takes on grand dimensions of Greek tragedy.

The real—and, regrettably, only—reason to seek out Criterion’s new release of this long-forgotten landmark is to marvel at the new digital master of a 2011 2K restoration that brought Kôhei Sugiyama’s vibrant color photography back to life. This was not only one of the first color pictures in Japanese cinema, but one of the first films to utilize color with the arresting vibrance of a truly painterly eye. The golds, reds and blues pop with such potency that they would’ve felt right at
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Criterion Collection: Gate of Hell | Blu-ray review

  • ioncinema
Teinosuke Kinugasa’s glorious and vibrant masterpiece, Gate of Hell, excitingly receives a Criterion digital remastering this month, a certifiable occasion because this not only recreates the film’s initial visual beauties, but the first time it will be widely available stateside (cinephiles were only previously privy to Eureka Entertainment’s UK Blu-ray release). Winner of the top prize at Cannes, as well as the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and Costume Design, Martin Scorsese names the film among one of the most beautiful color films of all time.

Based on the play Kesa’s Husband by Ken Kikuchi, the setting is 1159 Ad, known as the Heiji Era, and a rebellion has been staged against the royal family. Under siege, it is decided that a decoy must be used to distract the rebel army, and Lady Kesa (Machiko Kyo) assumes the responsibility, carted away by a group of samurais.
See full article at ioncinema »

'Hyde Park on Hudson' and Cronenberg's 'Naked Lunch' on DVD and Blu-ray This Week

When Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha Fluffy, whatever that is, is the top-selling new release at Amazon out of all the new releases this week you know it's not exactly a stellar line-up. That said, here's the small crop of titles the week has to offer. Naked Lunch (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray I have actually never seen David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch so I can't tell you anymore than the following synopsis: In this adaptation of William S. Burroughs's hallucinatory, once-thought-unfilmable novel Naked Lunch, directed by David Cronenberg, a part-time exterminator and full-time drug addict named Bill Lee (Peter Weller) plunges into the nightmarish Interzone, a netherworld of sinister cabals and giant talking bugs. Alternately humorous and grotesque--and always surreal-the film mingles aspects of Burroughs's novel with incidents from the writer's own life, resulting in an evocative paranoid fantasy and a self-reflexive investigation into the mysteries of the creative process. This has
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

In April, Criterion Has a Naked Lunch with Richard III, Repo Man & Pierre Etaix at the Gate of Hell

Every month the folks at Criterion Collection select a number of classic and contemporary films deemed culturally and/or artistically significant and then take great pains to remaster them for a Blu-ray transfer to help preserve them for another generation of cinephiles. If you love film, then you can appreciate the public service Criterion Collection does for the medium when it offers us HD remasters of cinematic classics like 1984's Repo Man (starring Harry Dean Stanton and Emilio Estevez), the Teinosuke Kinugasa's samurai tale Gate of Hell, Laurence Olivier's take on Shakespeare's Richard III, and David Cronenberg's adaptation of William S. Burrough's drugged out head trip novel Naked Lunch led by Peter Weller. Additionally, this April, Criterion Collection has assembled a collection of 5 films by French filmmaker Pierre Etaix. For details on all of this month's releases, just keep reading.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

New on DVD and Blu-ray: 'Hyde Park on Hudson' and More

  • NextMovie
This week: Bill Murray as President Franklin D. Roosevelt is the highlight of "Hyde Park on Hudson," which should in no way be considered a historically accurate account of Fdr's meeting with the King and Queen of England in 1939.

Also new this week are two Criterion Collection Blu-ray debuts: Laurence Olivier's "Richard III" ("My kingdom for a horse!") and David Cronenberg's "Naked Lunch" ("Exterminate all rational thought").

'Hyde Park on Hudson'

Box Office: $6.4 million

Rotten Tomatoes: 38% Rotten

Storyline: Based on the private journals and diaries of Margaret 'Daisy' Suckley (Laura Linney) that were found after her death, this biographical comedy drama takes a look at the events surrounding a pivotal historical meeting in upstate New York between President Franklin D. Roosevelt (Bill Murray) and the King and Queen of England on the eve of World War II. The British royals walk into an awkward domestic situation as Fdr's wife,
See full article at NextMovie »

New DVD Blu-Ray: 'Naked Lunch' Criterion, 'Hyde Park on Hudson'

  • Moviefone
Moviefone's Blu-ray of the Week "Naked Lunch" Criterion Collection What's It About? William S. Borroughs's landmark ode to drug use was never going to be coherently adapted for the big screen, so visionary sci-fi director David Cronenberg did the next best thing with a surreal, meta take on the writer's own hallucination-filled life. See It Because: It's probably one of the most underrated movies of the 1990s and visually on-par with the weirdness of "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas"; the Criterion Collection upgrades the movie's rich color palette, and packs this edition with looks at the movie's unsettling special effects and its real-life inspiration. New on DVD & Blu-ray "Down the Shore" What's It About? James Gandolfini stars in a New Jersey-set drama about small-town lives, that sat on the shelf for years before finally finding its way on DVD; if you watch it, you'll see why. In or Out?
See full article at Moviefone »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Gate of Hell

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 9, 2013

Price: DVD $19.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Criterion

The winner of two Oscars and the Grand Prix Prize at Cannes, Teinosuke Kinugasa’s (A Page of Madness) 1953 historical drama-romance Gate of Hell is a visually sumptuous, psychologically penetrating work.

In the midst of epic, violent intrigue in twelfth-century Japan, an imperial warrior falls for a lady-in-waiting. Even after he discovers she is married, he goes to extreme lengths to win her love. Nothing good can come of this…

A tragic story of obsession and unrequited passion, Kinugasa’s film was an early triumph of color cinematography in Japan. In fact, it’s reportedly the first Japanese film to employ a Western color process.

Presented in Japanese with English subtitles, the Criterion Blu-ray and DVD includes the following features:

• New high-definition digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition

• New English subtitle translation

• A booklet featuring an
See full article at Disc Dish »

News Shorts: January 16th 2013

  • Dark Horizons
Photos for Fast Six, The Wolverine, Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, and the cast of Mortal Kombat: Legacy 2.

Posters for The Sweeney, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Mood Indigo, Jack the Giant Slayer, Gambit, The Host, The End of Love, Epic, and the final episode of Fringe.

DC Comics has revealed a new 1:6 scale "Man of Steel" statue which offers a closer look at Henry Cavill's Superman costume. Click here to check out the statue.

"Criterion's April slate includes Alex Cox's 'Repo Man,' Laurence Olivier's 'Richard III,' Teinosuke Kinugasa's 'Gate of Hell,' a box-set featuring five films by French comedy filmmaker Pierre Etaix, and a Blu-ray version of David Cronenberg's 'Naked Lunch'…" (full details)

"'The Da Vinci Code' and 'Angels and Demons' author Dan Brown has announced 'Inferno,' his fourth novel featuring Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

'The Tenant,' 'Eraserhead,' 'Scanners' & More Teased From The Criterion Collection For 2013

  • The Playlist
One of the many pleasures of the Criterion Collection comes in the form of their monthly newsletters, in which they make good on a series of crude drawings hinting at upcoming releases (which in 2012 gave us a Robert Downey Sr. retrospective, “Quadrophenia,” and “Harold and Maude” among many others). It's a fun, collaborative peek into the months ahead, and in their fourth-annual Mega-Clue drawing for 2013, the folks over at CriterionCast have parsed out what looks to be a promising year indeed. While much clearer and more stripped down than last year's installment, the New Years Hint still holds a number of contentious clues within. However, there are some near certainties, such as the candy-loving woman seen in Mike Leigh's film “Life is Sweet,” the flames of Teinosuke Kinugasa's samurai film “Gate of Hell,” the Pink Pearl giveaway of David Lynch's “Eraserhead,” and the huge clock's indication...
See full article at The Playlist »

DVD Review: 'Gate of Hell' (Masters of Cinema rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ Winner of two Oscars and the Grand Prix Prize at Cannes, Teinosuke Kinugasa's arresting 1953 effort Gate of Hell was the first Japanese film to employ a Western colour process. Now, thanks to the hard work of the always reliable Masters of Cinema strand, Kinugasa's sumptuous hues and diverse palette have been gloriously reissued on Blu-ray, once again capturing the awe and magnificence of this visually spellbinding film. During an attempted coup in 12th century Japan, an attractive young woman, Lady Kesa (Machiko Kyo) volunteers to act as a decoy in order to help the lord's wife escape to safety.

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See full article at CineVue »
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