I Confess
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I Confess (1953) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

4 items from 2014


Video of the Day: See Every Alfred Hitchcock Cameo

21 August 2014 10:01 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Any Hitchcock fan has no doubt looked carefully while watching one of his movies in order to spot his infamous cameos. Hitchcock’s earlier cameos are especially hard to catch, and so Youtube user Morgan T. Rhys put together this video compiling every cameo Alfred Hitchcock ever made.

Hitchcock made a total of 39 self-referential cameos in his films over a 50 year period. Four of his films featured two cameo appearances (The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog UK), Suspicion, Rope, and Under Capricorn). Two recurring themes featured Hitchcock carrying a musical instrument, and using public transportation.

The films are as follows:

The Lodger (1927), Easy Virtue (1928), Blackmail (1929),Murder! (1930), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935),Sabotage (1936), Young and Innocent (1937), The Lady Vanishes (1938), Rebecca(1940), Foreign Correspondent (1940), Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941), Suspicion (1941),Saboteur (1942), Shadow of a Doubt (1943), Lifeboat (1944), Spellbound (1945),Notorious (1946), The Paradine Case (1947), Rope (1948), Under Capricorn (1949),Stage Fright (1950), Strangers on a Train »

- Ricky

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Watch: 25-Minute Documentary On The Underappreciated Montgomery Clift

12 August 2014 10:45 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

In discussions regarding the beginnings of onscreen method acting, Montgomery Clift is often unfairly shunted away in favor of Marlon Brando and James Dean. The actor first came to prominence in 1948, courtesy of lead roles in both Fred Zinnemann’s WWII film “The Search” and opposite John Wayne in Howard Hawks’s "Red River." Clift went on to celluloid immortality via films like "From Here To Eternity," "I Confess," "Judgment At Nuremberg" and "A Place In Sun," earning four Oscar nominations along the way. A documentary examining Clift's life and work from the early nineties has surfaced, and is an excellent primer for his exceptional and yet underexamined career. Despite his distaste for "business as usual" in Hollywood and some poor career choices, Clift could very well have been as celebrated as the two famous contemporaries mentioned above. But a near-fatal car crash in 1956 »

- Cain Rodriguez

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‘Le Confessionnal’ a post-modern ode to Hitchcock from Robert Lepage

2 April 2014 9:06 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

This year, Robert Lepage was honoured as the recipient of the Glenn Gould Prize awarded for “a unique lifetime contribution that has enriched the human conditions through the arts.” Previous winners include Leonard Cohen, Yo-Yo Ma, Oscar Peterson, and R. Murray Schafer. In association with The Glenn Gould Foundation, Tiff presented a retrospective on his directorial work. One of the most famed working filmmakers in Quebec, Lepage’s influence extends far beyond the screen and he is also one of the foremost directors of the stage. Considered an important figure in the theatrical avant-garde, he brings his multi-media and theatrical approach to the screen to create unique and layered visions of the world.

Back in 1995, Lepage made his feature film debut with Le Confessionnal, a post-modern Hitchcock pastiche set in Quebec. The film is the story of the Lamontagne family and spans two different eras and the issues and crises »

- Justine Smith

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Sundance Review: In 'Calvary,' John Michael McDonagh Tries Sincerity On For Size

21 January 2014 5:29 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“I think there’s too much talk about sins and not enough talk about virtues," Father James says in director John Michael McDonagh’s second film “Calvary,” an Irish mystery-comedy hybrid. Echoing Montgomery Clift's Father Logan in Alfred Hitchcock's 1953 thriller "I Confess," the vested protagonist exists in a fine tradition. Played with a serious face by sophomore McDonagh collaborator Brendan Gleeson, the virtuous Father James represents a dramatic shift not only from the paradigm of leading men in current cinema; his story also diverges from the pigeonhole dug for the director by the smashing success of McDonagh’s first film "The Guard," which premiered at Sundance in 2011 to great fanfare. The climate following the new movie's premiere in Park City, however, contained a far more subdued tone. While the silence suggested the somber tone of the film disappointed some—perhaps they came for Gleeson to rehash the foul-mouthed »

- Katherine Kilkenny

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

4 items from 2014


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