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The Most Visible Star: Marilyn Monroe’s Acting Talent

The actress is mostly remembered for her good looks, but what about her impressive performances?

In Richard Dyer’s book Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society, he writes that Marilyn Monroe was “the most visible star”: an actress whose life was put on display, and remains so over 50 years after her death. She is one of the most iconic Hollywood stars of all time, her face instantly recognizable to even those who have never seen any of her movies. She is a symbol of beauty, glamor, cinema, femininity, blondness, sexuality, and tragedy. While the world speculates about her personal life — who was she romantically involved with? How did she die? What was she really like? — her career as an actress is overshadowed by her fame.

While she may not have been the greatest actress of all time, she certainly had her fair share of talent and intelligence, and always worked incredibly hard to bring her
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Marilyn Monroe’s ‘Happy Birthday, Mr. President’ Dress Sells for $4.81 Million at Auction

  • PEOPLE.com
Marilyn Monroe’s ‘Happy Birthday, Mr. President’ Dress Sells for $4.81 Million at Auction
When Marilyn Monroe passed away in 1962, she was already an icon – but her legacy has surpassed any thing she could have imagined. Her visage adorns every type of paraphernalia imaginable, her impersonators crowd Times Square and Hollywood Boulevard, and of course, there was that time that superfans could buy a lock of her hair aboard a cruise ship for a reasonable $8,000.

And at an auction hosted by Julien’s, which began on Thursday and will continue through the weekend, one of the actress’s most recognizable gowns, the one she wore to wish President John F. Kennedy a very sexy happy birthday,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Watch This: The Best Of Everything offers a valuable glance at postwar office romance

  • The AV Club
One week a month, Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by the week’s new releases or premieres. This week: Equity inspires a look back at other films set in the corporate world.

The Best Of Everything (1959)

By 1959, director Jean Negulesco had already helmed two movies depicting the lives of three young women looking for love in the big city: How To Marry A Millionaire and Three Coins In The Fountain. For The Best Of Everything, based on twentysomething editor Rona Jaffe’s novel, Negulesco moved the setting to the glamorous world of New York publishing. In a lovelorn typing pool, ambitious Caroline (Hope Lange), innocent April (Diane Baker), and glamorous Gregg (early supermodel Suzy Parker) are all felled by the cads they love.

Image: 20th Century Fox/Getty Images

The movie is about as sexist as you can get on both sides, to an almost absurd (and ...
See full article at The AV Club »

All These Movies Are Disappearing From Netflix on July 1

  • BuzzSugar
You have mere days left to watch all these movies and TV shows, because come July, they'll be gone. With the truckload of new movies hitting Netflix in July, all these are expiring. It's a sad event, but at least we have a heads-up so that we can get all our watching in now. Take a look, and make sure you've caught all the new movies that popped up in June! Expiring July 1 2001: A Space Odyssey A Clockwork Orange A League of Their Own Allegiance Along Came Polly Best in Show The Beverly Hillbillies Bulworth Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid Caillou The Central Park Five Cheech & Chong's Up in Smoke The Conspiracy Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, seasons one-two Dinosaur Train, season two Drive Me Crazy Flashpoint, seasons one-five The Flintstones The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas The Game, seasons one-three How to Marry a Millionaire Ice Age: The Meltdown Medium,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Ed Catto: Geek Culture’s Panic Attack

  • Comicmix
As I watched Fox’s Lucifer the other night, I uttered my all-too common refrain “Oh, that’s from a comic book.” Even I am amazed how often I recite it. The frequency with which we all say that simple phrase is proof that Geek Culture is thriving in 2016.

But in many ways Geek Culture never went away, it’s just that the momentum driving pop culture has gained so much visible traction in the last few years. This week I’m turning back the clock to 1954 to take a look at something that seems unique, but actually isn’t unique at all. I’d like to focus on comic that was a copy of another wildly popular comic. But therein lies the charm. Amazingly, its publication resulted in a ban from the state of Massachusetts, a police raid and an arrest.

Panic was EC’s other parody comic and
See full article at Comicmix »

Video: Beyond That Revenant Bear Rumor - 10 Urban Legends About Movies

  • PEOPLE.com
Video: Beyond That Revenant Bear Rumor - 10 Urban Legends About Movies
An awkward thing happened to the Leonardo DiCaprio film The Revenant as it trekked into theaters last last year in hopes of picking up award show nominations: A rumor put the film in headlines but for reasons that none of its publicists were happy about. In early December, 20th Century Fox spokespeople were forced to clarify that no, the film does not feature a scene in which its star is raped by a bear. DiCaprio himself later weighed in on the rumor, calling it "absurd," and when the film finally hit theaters on Christmas Day, audiences saw that the rumor
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Scott Reviews Jules Dassin’s Thieves’ Highway [Arrow Films Blu-ray Review]

Jules Dassin didn’t do much in the way of subversion. At least not cinematically. He didn’t have many overarching themes to his work, he didn’t twist his genre films into something they weren’t. What he did was utilize every one of the handful of tools he was given, and pushed his films to their absolute breaking point. His subversion was a sort of perversion, an excess of imagination and a willingness to show the world as he saw it. If that meant creating a filmography that looked suspicious to the House Committee of Un-American Activities, well, that was just the natural result of having an eye and an ear for how the common man lived.

It can’t have helped that his last film before the blacklist order came down was Thieves’ Highway, an all-out indictment of capitalism cloaked in the noir-drenched mode of a typical Fox gritty,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Latin Lovers | DVD Review

  • ioncinema
Prolific Hollywood director Mervyn LeRoy continued an impressive output of work during the collapse of the studio system of the 1950s, churning out twelve titles that decade and starting his own production company associated with Warner Bros. Though his career would taper off in the mid-to-late 60s, he was known for a helming a wide variety of genres. However, his later career would see a return to musical inclinations, though not all of them have withstood the tests of time. One such obscure item in his filmography is 1953’s Latin Lovers, an ‘exotic’ romantic pseudo-musical comedy of rich people’s errors starring one of LeRoy’s most famous credited ‘discoveries,’ Lana Turner. Here, she’s swathed in decadent black and white numbers as a woman of impressive and independent financial means, victim to a shared paranoia of the historically sensitive wealthy American in that she believes men only want her for her money.
See full article at ioncinema »

Marilyn, Betty and Lauren How To Marry A Millionaire – Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe Theater

“Wealthy men are never old!”

How To Marry A Millionaire screens Saturday morning, November 21st, at 10:30am at The Hi-Pointe Theater (1005 McCausland Ave, St. Louis). This is a fundraiser for The Cottey College Scholarship Fund and admission is $10.

How To Marry A Millionaire is a 1953 romantic comedy based on the plays The Greeks Had a Word for It by Zoe Akins and Loco by Dale Eunson and Katherine Albert. The film stars Marilyn Monroe, St. Louis’ own Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall as three gold diggers along with William Powell, David Wayne, Rory Calhoun, Cameron Mitchell, Alex D’Arcy, and Fred Clark.It was directed by Jean Negulesco and produced and written by Nunnally Johnson.

In order to meet wealthy husbands, three beautiful women take an apartment in one of Manhattan’s most affluent areas, on the corner of East 55th St. and Sutton Place. Naive moocher Betty Grable
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Come Fly With Me

Dolores Hart, Pamela Tiffin and Lois Nettleton are flight attendants aiming to snag three attractive, wealthy husbands right out of the air -- Karl Boehm, Hugh O'Brien and Karl Malden. There's more social comment in this 'coffee, tea or me' romantic comedy than can be found in a graduate thesis about the sexual habits of liberated stewardesses. And Hey, Frankie Avalon warbles the classy title tune! Come Fly with Me DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1963 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 109 min. / Street Date June 30, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 18.49 Starring Dolores Hart, Hugh O'Brian, Karlheinz Bohm, Pamela Tiffin, Lois Nettleton, Karl Malden, Dawn Addams, Richard Wattis, Andrew Cruickshank, James Dobson, Lois Maxwell, John Crawford, Robert Easton, Maurice Marsac, George Coulouris, Ferdy Mayne. Cinematography Oswald Morris Film Editor Frank Clarke Original Music Lyn Murray Written by William Roberts from a book by Bernard Glemser Produced by Anatole De Grunwald Directed by Henry Levin

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Death of Marilyn Monroe, The Birth of James Bond

  • SoundOnSight
Editor’s Note: This article was originally published November 1, 2012.

Fifty years ago this month, Marilyn Monroe passed away from a suspected accidental drug overdose (although conspiracy geeks love to contemplate more nefarious scenarios). The commemoratives are already showing up on magazine and newspaper entertainment pages, cable channels have announced their Marilyn film fests and documentary tributes. There’s little of worth I can add either in academic consideration or aesthetic appreciation to all the testimonials as well as the previous fifty years of ruminating in print and on film re: the lasting appeal of La Monroe. I can only wonder, with a sort of melancholy amazement, over the fact we’re still talking about her all these years later.

That persistent hold she has on popular culture is a fascinating study in itself. Her career had already been faltering when she died, she’s been gone a half-century, yet there
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fox Celebrates its Centennial with 100 Digital Releases

  • Comicmix
Los Angeles, Calif. (October 2, 2015) – In 1915 William Fox founded Fox Film Corporation and forever changed the course of cinema. Over the next century the studio would develop some of the most innovative and ground-breaking advancements in the history of cinema; the introduction of Movietone, the implementation of color in partnership with Eastman Kodak, the development of the wide format in 70mm and many more. Now in honor of the 100th anniversary of the studio, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment will celebrate by releasing some of their most iconic films that represent a decade of innovation.

Starting today, five classic films from the studio will be made available digitally for the first time ever – Sunrise (1927), Drums Along the Mohawk (1939), Man Hunt (1941), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) and The Flight of the Phoenix (1965). Throughout the rest of the year a total of 100 digital releases will follow from Fox’s extensive catalog, including 10 films
See full article at Comicmix »

House of Bamboo | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
Twilight Time brings Sam Fuller’s exotic 1955 color noir House of Bamboo to Blu-ray, a resplendently colorful film and the first major Us production to film in post-war Japan. While Fuller re-tooled Harry Kleiner’s script for the 1948 film The Street with No Name to meet his own offbeat needs, the film experienced a rather cool reception, garnering praise for Joseph MacDonald’s cinematography (and has since been hailed by sources as some of the best uses of widescreen photography in the history of cinema) but little else. Following on the heels of successful black and white titles like Hell and High Water (1954) and the acclaimed film noir Pickup on South Street (1953), it’s a harder title to classify, featuring Fuller’s usual signature of off-balance touches in a production that now seems ahead of its time (especially compared to something like 1964’s black and white provocation The Naked Kiss
See full article at ioncinema »

Marilyn Monroe: Nine Years of Stardom and a Legacy That Won’t Quit

Marilyn Monroe: Nine Years of Stardom and a Legacy That Won’t Quit
August 5 marks the anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s death in 1962. Few Hollywood stars have created such a powerful legacy based on such a small, brief output: starring roles in 11 films, released during a nine-year period.

Fox ran an ad in Daily Variety in 1952, the year Monroe starred in “Don’t Bother to Knock,” proclaiming her “a new star.” Studios often took out ads to promote contract players and 20th Century Fox was building her career, so the promo wasn’t unusual. However, in her case, the words sound more factual than hype.

Her big breakthrough occurred in 1953, when she starred in “Niagara,” “How to Marry a Millionaire” and “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,” all for Fox. From that point until her death, at age 36, she was the hottest thing in Hollywood.

In “Conversations With Wilder,” director Billy Wilder told Cameron Crowe that he didn’t like working with her. In 1955’s “The Seven Year Itch,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 20 Best Female-Driven Comedies

  • Hitfix
The 20 Best Female-Driven Comedies
"Trainwreck," the new Amy Schumer/Judd Apatow movie, examines the plight of one snarly woman as she exits her familiar world of sexual freedom and hangovers for a detour into serious romance. Though several eye-popping cameos and supporting performances buttress the film, Schumer's performance is the acting triumph of "Trainwreck." Without her shaky conscience and burgeoning sense of fulfillment, the movie's conventional story might feel staid. Thankfully, it's anything but. Schumer's performance marks a welcome addition to cinema's long line of strident, hilarious female protagonists. We're celebrating that lineage with a list: the 20 best female-driven comedies ever. Some are old and some are new, but all are marked by a degree of cosmopolitan fun and nerviness -- and the occasional slap from Cher. 20. "How to Marry a Millionaire" We remember Lauren Bacall as a glamor girl with a damning grimace, but let's start revising that narrative to include her chops as a comic force.
See full article at Hitfix »

Fashion in film celebrated in New York by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-04-01 09:56:39

Audrey Hepburn in Givenchy with Fred Astaire - Stanley Donen's Funny Face

Spring in New York comes alive with Haute Couture on Film featuring the work of Hubert de Givenchy in Stanley Donen's Funny Face, starring Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire and Kay Thompson, presented by Eye For Film's Anne-Katrin Titze on April 7.

See creations by Pierre Cardin in Jacques Demy's Bay Of Angels (La Baie Des Anges) with Jeanne Moreau, Claude Mann, Paul Guers and Henri Nassiet. Emanuel Ungaro made the clothes for Gena Rowlands in John Cassavetes' Gloria with Julie Carmen and Buck Henry. Coco Chanel in Jean Renoir's The Rules Of The Game (La Règle Du Jeu) dressed Nora Gregor, Paulette Dubost, Mila Parély and Odette Talazac. Be dazzled by Christian Dior in Jean Negulesco's How To Marry A Millionaire with Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, and Lauren Bacall. Yves Saint Laurent's
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Lauren Bacall: Behind the Closed Doors of Her $26 Million Apartment

  • PEOPLE.com
Lauren Bacall: Behind the Closed Doors of Her $26 Million Apartment
On a high floor in the famous Dakota building in New York City's Upper West Side lived screen legend Lauren Bacall. Surrounded by personal treasures, the late actress spent more than 30 years in the space, decorating it with memories that spanned decades. Following Bacall's death in August, an estimated $3 million worth of her jewelry and art will be auctioned off March 31 and April 1 at Bonhams New York. Her Manhattan home is also now up for sale. Valued at $26 million (she bought the property in 1961 for $48,000), the luxe apartment overlooks Central Park at 1 W. 72nd St. in a landmark building
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Lauren Bacall: Behind the Closed Doors of Her $26 Million Apartment

  • PEOPLE.com
Lauren Bacall: Behind the Closed Doors of Her $26 Million Apartment
On a high floor in the famous Dakota building in New York City's Upper West Side lived screen legend Lauren Bacall. Surrounded by personal treasures, the late actress spent more than 30 years in the space, decorating it with memories that spanned decades. Following Bacall's death in August, an estimated $3 million worth of her jewelry and art will be auctioned off March 31 and April 1 at Bonhams New York. Her Manhattan home is also now up for sale. Valued at $26 million (she bought the property in 1961 for $48,000), the luxe apartment overlooks Central Park at 1 W. 72nd St. in a landmark building
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The 31 Best Chick Flicks on Netflix Right Now

  • Moviefone
Why bother going out to the multiplex when the movies you want to see are on Netflix? Whether it's a classic weepie like "An Affair to Remember," an Audrey Hepburn movie, a Jane Austen favorite or "Clueless" (again), here are some of the best chick flicks streaming on Netflix right now. (Availability subject to change.)

1. "13 Going on 30" (2004)

Who doesn't love a good time-traveling romantic comedy, especially one with a big "Thriller" dance showstopper?

2. "An Affair to Remember" (1957)

The classic romantic weepie (as referenced in "Sleepless in Seattle"), starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr as lovers whom fate cruelly tears apart.

3. "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961)

Audrey Hepburn was never lovelier (or naughtier) than as Holly Golightly, a trendy New Yorker with a complicated love life and a cat called, well, Cat.

4. "Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason" (2004)

The sequel finds Bridget (Renee Zellweger) in Thailand, where she's tempted to stray with ex
See full article at Moviefone »
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