House of Wax (1953) - News Poster

(1953)

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Hangover Square

No, it’s not a the-day-after sequel to The Lost Weekend, but a class-act mystery-horror from 20th-Fox, at a time when the studio wasn’t keen on scare shows. John Brahm directs the ill-fated Laird Cregar as a mad musician . . . or, at least a musician driven mad by a perfidious femme fatale, Darryl Zanuck’s top glamour girl Linda Darnell.

Hangover Square

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1945 /B&W / 1:37 Academy / 77 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Laird Cregar, Linda Darnell, George Sanders, Faye Marlowe, Glenn Langan, Alan Napier.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Harry Reynolds

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Barré Lyndon

Produced by Robert Bassler

Directed by John Brahm

Here’s a serious quality upgrade for horror fans. Although technically a period murder thriller, as a horror film John Brahm’s tense Hangover Square betters its precursor The Lodger in almost every department. We don
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Warner horror coming to HMV’s ‘Premium Collection’

If you’re a film-fan like us, you’ll probably be very aware of HMV’s Premium Collection series. Releasing revered films across all genres, Premium Collection sets containing the film on Blu-ray, DVD and a Digital Copy giving physical media fans a “must own” version of each film; along with a collectible slipcase and collectible artcards featuring the films key art and lobby cards style stills.

Well this week Warner Bros. have officially announced that three classic genre films in their library are getting the Premium Collection treatment: House of Wax 3D, The Haunting and A Clockwork Orange (who’d have thought that Kubrick’s film would, finally, be so revered in the UK after years in the filmic wilderness?). All three release on October 16th via HMV stores and HMV.com

House Of Wax 3D

Warner Bros. proudly presents the most successful 3D movie of the 1950s – and
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The Indian Fighter

Kirk Douglas grits his teeth and goes full macho, wrasslin’ with that beautiful Sioux up in the high country — the Sioux miss in question being the Italian model Elsa Martinelli in her screen debut. Kirk can’t decide if he wants to stay with Elsa, or lead what must be the most shameful bunch of pioneer bigots ever to cross the plains. Walter Matthau and Diana Douglas are standouts in this vigorous action western directed by André de Toth.

The Indian Fighter

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1955 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 88 min. / Street Date May 9, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Kirk Douglas, Elsa Martinelli, Walter Matthau, Diana Douglas, Walter Abel, Lon Chaney Jr., Eduard Franz, Alan Hale Jr., Elisha Cook Jr., Ray Teal, Frank Cady, Michael Winkelman, William Phipps.

Cinematography: Wilfrid M. Cline

Art Direction: Wiard Ihnen

Film Editor: Richard Cahoon

Original Music: Irving Gordon, Franz Waxman

Written by Robert L. Richards,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

A Cure for Wellness: Jason Isaacs on His Enigmatic Role

One would think having played Captain Hook in Peter Pan, Lucius Malfoy in the Harry Potter movies and voicing DC villains like Sinestro and Ra's Al Ghul in animated films--as well as a couple more authoritarian figures in Star Wars: Rebels--would have gotten any desire to be evil out of actor Jason Isaacs’ system.

And yet, he’s playing a more enigmatic character in director Gore Verbinski’s twisted new thriller A Cure for Wellness, which follows Dane DeHaan as a financial broker named Lockhard to Switzerland to retrieve the CEO of his company who is thought to have lost his marble in search of a cure at a spa located at an old castle in the Alps. Once there, Lockhard breaks his leg in a car accident, and he’s put under the care of Isaacs’ Dr. Vollmar, creator of the cure based around the area’s underground waters and their healing properties.
See full article at LRM Online »

Ring Twice For Miranda

Ring Twice for Miranda

Stage II at New York City Center Through April 16, 2017

During Ring Twice for Miranda, while witnessing the frequent long and drawn-out arguments scenes that pepper this play’s landscape, I was reminded of Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls. What kept your attention during that film’s interminable arguments among Warhol’s characters was hope of some kind of satisfying resolution. Playwright Alan Hruska is by trade a litigation lawyer, so he knows how to argue. Unfortunately his characters do not share his real life expertise. I kept saying to myself “come on, get on with it!” My impatience had me physically squirming much as I did when, eons ago, I first viewed Chelsea Girls! In addition, specters of the post-apocalyptic Spike Milligan/Richard Lester film collaboration The Bed Sitting Room floated about me. Absent from Miranda’s world was the clear social satire and whimsy which sustained Mr.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Review: "The Mad Magician" (1954) Starring Vincent Price; Twilight Time Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Though Vincent Price would eventually garner a well-deserved reputation as Hollywood’s preeminent bogeyman, it was only really with André De Toth’s House of Wax (1953) that the actor would become associated with all things sinister. In some sense the playful, nervously elegant Price was an odd successor to the horror film-maestro throne: he was a somewhat aristocratic psychotic who shared neither Boris Karloff’s cold and malevolent scowl nor Bela Lugosi’s distinctly unhinged madness or old-world exoticism.

His early film career started in a less pigeonholed manner: as a budding movie actor with a seven year contract for Universal Studios in the 1940s, the tall, elegant Price would appear in a number of semi-distinguished if modestly-budgeted romantic comedies and dramas. His contract with Universal was apparently non-exclusive, and his most memorable roles for the studio were his earliest. In a harbinger of things to come,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Mad Magician 3-D

The Mad Magician

3-D Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1954 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 72 min. / Street Date January 10, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Vincent Price, Mary Murphy, Eva Gabor, John Emery, Donald Randolph, Lenita Lane, Patrick O’Neal, Jay Novello, Corey Allen, Conrad Brooks, Tom Powers, Lyle Talbot.

Cinematography: Bert Glennon

Editor: Grant Whytock

Original Music: Arthur Lange, Emil Newman

Written by: Crane Wilbur

Produced by: Bryan Foy

Directed by John Brahm

Twilight Time, bless ’em, hands us another treat to go with their 3-D discs of Man in the Dark, Miss Sadie Thompson and Harlock Space Pirate 3-D — and this time it’s a fun bit of 1950s horror — with a hot pair of short subject extras.

There have been plenty of theories as to why horror films became scarce after WW2; it’s as if the U.S. film industry took a ten-year break from the supernatural, and partly
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Film Festival Roundup: AFI Fest Adds ‘La La Land’ Gala, London Awards Kelly Reichardt’s ‘Certain Women’ and More

Film Festival Roundup: AFI Fest Adds ‘La La Land’ Gala, London Awards Kelly Reichardt’s ‘Certain Women’ and More
Keep up with the always-hopping film festival world with our weekly Film Festival Roundup column. Check out last week’s Roundup right here.

Full Lineup Announcements

– “3-D Auteurs,” a 19-day, 34-film festival spotlighting stereoscopic movies by some of history’s most distinguished directors, will run at Film Forum November 11 – 29. The festival spans 3-D’s earliest days (including some turn-of-the-century films by pioneer Georges Méliès) to the present, and represents virtually every genre, including Westerns, Film Noir, and Science Fiction. Hollywood’s first big 3-D craze (sometimes called 3-D’s “golden era”), intended to offset the threat of television, came in the early 1950s, with such movies as Hitchcock’s “Dial M For Murder,” André De Toth’s “House of Wax” and Jack Arnold’s “Creature From the Black Lagoon” (all included in the series).

Hollywood produced roughly 50 movies in the process from 1952 to 1954, before fizzling out and being overtaken by
See full article at Indiewire »

The Nine Greatest Horror Film Stars of All Time

  • Cinelinx
Halloween is almost here. This is the time of year for putting your favorite horror films in the DVD player. When you think of horror movies over the decades, there are certain actors whose names are indelibly linked to the horror genre. In honor of Halloween 2016, Cinelinx looks at the nine greatest horror films stars of all time.

9) Robert Englund: He made a name for himself as the burnt-faced dream demon Freddy Kruger. His body of horror work includes...A Nightmare On Elm Street, Anoes 2: Freddy’s Revenge, Anoes 3: Dream Warriors, Anoes 4: The Dream Master, Anoes 5: The Dream Child, Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare, Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, Freddy Vs. Jason, The Phantom of the Opera, Nightmare Café, Night Terrors, Mortal Fear, The Mangler, Urban Legend, Sanitarium, The Funhouse Massacre, etc.

8) Jamie Lee Curtis: The woman who created the trend of females
See full article at Cinelinx »

The Tingler: Fun 1950s Horror Movies to Watch During Halloween

Vincent Price starred in a ton of B horror movies throughout the course of his career. From the films he made in the ’50s, most people are familiar with The House on Haunted Hill, The Fly, and House of Wax, which are all films I enjoy watching during the Halloween seasons. They’re fantastic movies that have coincidentally all been remade over the years. But the film I wanted to focus on in this next installment of "Fun 1950s Horror Movies to Watch During Halloween" is the actor’s 1959 film, The Tingler.

The Tingler doesn't seem like it’s as popular as the other films he’s made. Whenever I bring it up with certain friends, family, and other people, I’m almost always met with a perplexed look on their face, like they’ve never heard of the movie before! I’m sure many of you are familiar with it,
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NYC Weekend Watch: Amy Heckerling, J.G. Ballard, Noël Coward & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Spend “A Weekend with Amy Heckerling” when Johnny Dangerously and Fast Times at Ridgemont High screen this Saturday, while Look Who’s Talking and Clueless show on Sunday. All are on 35mm.

For “Welcome to Metrograph: A-z,” see a print of Philippe Garrel‘s The Inner Scar on Friday and Sunday; André de Toth‘s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Released On This Day: 1953’s House Of Wax

Shock celebrates 3D horror classic House Of Wax on the anniversary of its release. “Everything I ever loved has been taken away from me , but not you my Marie Antoinette for I will give you eternal life…” So says Professor Henry Jarrod, the disfigured and now maniacal sculptor in director Andre de Toth’s classic…

The post Released On This Day: 1953’s House Of Wax appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Theatre Of Blood

“You begin to resent an actor if you always have to give him bad notices.” Upon his death in 1993, Vincent Price left an unfillable chasm in the horror community. He was our King Ghoul, the Gentleman of Terror who never missed a lipsmack or an arched eyebrow. His leering, singsong tones were music to horror lovers’ ears, every syllable a delicious symphony of delight. To the fans, that is – Price, while alive, was dismissed by the press as a preening ham not to be taken seriously. How fitting then, that he should find his greatest role as a vengeful actor lashing out at his critics in the most macabre of ways? Theatre of Blood (1973) reflected on Price’s place in the pantheon, and showed the naysayers once and for all his innate gifts.

Released by United Artists in April, Theatre of Blood, or Theater of Blood (to paraphrase a Joe Walsh album title,
See full article at DailyDead »

Interview: Johnny Unheimlich!

Interview: Johnny Unheimlich!
As you creeps well know, there is nothin’ I love more than a band that brings the arcane to their audio, and for my money, there is no one that is doing it with quite so much preternatural panache as Binghamton, NY’s Johnny Unheimlich! And what do ya know—look who just strolled into the Crypt o’ Xiii!

Famous Monsters. The sound of Johnny Unheimlich goes down as smooth as a glass of wine the color of a moonless midnight; it’s all cool creep with a hint of some undefined menace! How did you develop the sound?

Nick Ransom. First off, I’ve got to say thank you massively for that, it’s a huge compliment to both of us. My musical tastes have always been hugely eclectic—my parents are largely to blame or thank for that—and that’s factored hugely into what we play. Our
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

It’s Vincent Price Week in St. Louis! Here Are His Ten Best Films

Born in St. Louis on May 27, 1911, iconic actor Vincent Price retained a special fondness for his place of origin, and that love was reciprocated with Vincentennial, a celebration of his 100th birthday in his hometown back in May of 2011 (for summary of all the Vincentennial activities go Here). One of the guests of honor at Vincentennial was Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price. Because of their close relationship and her access to his unpublished memoirs and letters, Victoria Price was able to provide a remarkably vivid account of her father’s public and private life in her essential book, Vincent Price, a Daughter’s Biography, originally published in 1999. .In 2011, her biography of her father was out of print. but now it’s been re-issued and Victoria will be in St. Louis this weekend (October 9th – 10th) for three special events. In addition to the biography, she will also be signing
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Drive-In Dust Offs: House Of Wax

Whether you’re all for 3D, or have reserved a special place in hell for those awkward glasses, it would seem that it is here to stay. Long before it turned into the latest service fee added onto the bill of your movie going experience, 3D was a fun (and new) twist for film lovers. And with House of Wax (1953), Warner Bros. created not only the first color major studio 3D film, but one of the finest horror films of the 50’s, period.

Released in April of ’53, House of Wax was a pricey venture (1 million Us to produce), but one that Warner Bros. was willing to bank on after the smash 3D success of Bwana Devil (1952), an independent production. By this point, the major studios were desperate to get people back to the movies, as that new and nasty little box called television halved theatre attendance. What they achieved with
See full article at DailyDead »

Vincent Price Goes Digging—In Technicolor

A year after starring in House of Wax, Vincent Price made another film with a solid cast and a script by an Oscar-winning writer, photographed in Technicolor by the man who went on to shoot such rainbow-hued classics as Mary Poppins. But Born in Freedom: The Story of Colonel Drake never played in theaters: it was an industrial film. Many Hollywood professionals made a good living working in the arena of nontheatrical filmmaking. These sponsored films were underwritten by various corporations, industrial groups, and branches of our government. Now my pal Ron Hall at Festival Films has released a collection of these oddities on DVD under the title Industrial Strength America. Born...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

The Last Great Horror Icon Is Gone: Where Are the Future Scare Masters?

  • Cinelinx
With the death of horror film legend Christopher Lee, the last of the legendary honor guard of horror has passed on. He was part of an elite group that created the horror genre. Lee’s passing is a reminder that it’s been a long time since we had a new horror film superstar. Is the day of the horror film specialist gone forever? Where are the big-screen boogie-men for the 21st century?

Once upon a time there were a group of actors, known as the ‘screen boogiemen’ who created the horror film/monster movie genre (starting in Universal Studios and later in Hammer Studios.) They were specialists who understood the psychology and performance style of horror cinema and became legends in the industry. The first was silent film star Lon Chaney Sr. (Phantom of the Opera, London After Midnight, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, the Unholy Three, the Monster,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Happy Birthday Vincent Price! A Look Back at Vincentennial

Today is Vincent Price’s 104th Birthday! Price was born here in St. Louis on this date in 1911 and is the most iconic movie star to hail from our city. Price, who died October 25th 1993, was also a gourmand, author, stage actor, speaker, world-class art collector, raconteur, and all-around Renaissance man. Vincent Price was simply one of the most remarkable people of the 20th Century. Four years ago we had the opportunity to celebrate his 100th birthday and St. Louis was the place to do it. I teamed up with Cinema St. Louis to present Vincentennial, The Vincent Price 100th Birthday Celebration, an event that lasted through much of the Spring of 2011. The following year Vincentennial won two coveted Rondo Awards, one for “Best Fan Event” and a second for myself as “Monster Kid of the Year” for directing the event. The Rondo Awards are prestigious Fan Awards given out
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

3D in the 21st Century. Come Into My World: The Dimensions of "Avatar"

  • MUBI
One way of telling the history of photographic arts is to describe a linear progression of more and more realistic picture-making, as if painter's brushes and pencils aimed mainly to approximate the human eye until, finally, photography emerged. (This is the premise André Bazin famously explored in “The Ontology of the Photographic Image.”) Given photography's automatic reproduction, painting could move on to express more boldly, more experimentally, more abstractly. Realism was no longer necessary. Incidentally, a lot of the most visible and most discussed uses of CGI and SFX in contemporary cinema have embodied images, actions, and temporalities that are far from realistic. These digital platforms enable visions of worlds that alter our own sufficiently so as to provide something—escape? Improvement? Color? It doesn't ultimately matter. The point is that the pixel has often been directed towards ends that seem to go against photography (and cinematography's) automatic capture of the world.
See full article at MUBI »
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