7.2/10
133
8 user 2 critic

Gilbert and Sullivan (1953)

The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (original title)
The common career of W.S. Gilbert,a barrister turned comic writer, and Arthur Sullivan, a classic composer turned converted against his will to light music, who wrote fourteen operettas between 1871 and 1896, to great public acclaim.

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, (book) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Martyn Green ...
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Muriel Aked ...
Michael Ripper ...
Louis
Bernadette O'Farrell ...
Ann Hanslip ...
Bride
Eric Berry ...
Yvonne Marsh ...
Second bride
Lloyd Lamble ...
Joseph Bennett
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Storyline

The common career of W.S. Gilbert,a barrister turned comic writer, and Arthur Sullivan, a classic composer turned converted against his will to light music, who wrote fourteen operettas between 1871 and 1896, to great public acclaim.

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A lush and joyous portrayal of the lives and the music of the men who entertained toe world for generations. See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

15 February 1953 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Gilbert and Sullivan  »

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Coincidentally, a poster outside D'Oyle Carte's office shows a caricature of Oscar Wilde; an actor plays Oscar Wilde briefly in another scene, and two of the male leads, Robert Morley and Peter Finch, would go on to play Oscar Wilde themselves in later movies. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Frasier: They're Playing Our Song (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Brilliant and highly entertaining musical biography.
14 June 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Every scene propels the film through the collaboration of Gilbert and Sullivan, hitting most of the high points and portraying the lows with the sympathy and understanding that creative geniuses deserve. I was predisposed to liking it, because I was a fanatical G&S enthusiast first, but it was a relief to discover that this film was a worthy tribute to their legacy. Providence deserves the credit for forcing friends to acquaint me with the operas of Gilbert and Sullivan, when I was dead set against them (for no apparent reason). Later, Providence rewarded my open mind by delivering into my hands (from out of the blue) a 35mm Technicolor print of the film. My reason for mentioning it is that the print had an intermission at about the one hour point. It seemed silly at first, but I later discovered that the print had been shown "double system," with separate hour-long reels of 35mm magnetic sound tracks. This was confirmed by an article in the Journal of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, which stated that The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan had been one of the earliest films presented with magnetic stereo sound (before the composite magnetic prints of Cinemascope). I never found the magnetic stereo tracks, but the print also had the usual monaural optical track, of very good quality. My print eventually decomposed from vinegar syndrome, but I was able to buy a VHS tape from a G&S society in England, which apparently owns the rights. I wonder whether they own the stereo tracks, or will ever release a DVD. Are there not enough G&S fans in the world to make it hugely profitable?


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