IMDb > The Glass Wall (1953)

The Glass Wall (1953) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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Down 68% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Ivan Tors (screenplay) and
Maxwell Shane (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Glass Wall on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
31 July 1953 (Finland) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
THE 10-HOUR MANHUNT...that tore New York apart!
Plot:
Peter, a WW II 'displaced person' about to be deported jumps ship in New York harbor in an effort to... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win See more »
NewsDesk:
Sun & Sin, John & Julie: Palm Noir
 (From Huffington Post. 20 May 2010, 8:47 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
A vividly raffish New York City comes to life in Maxwell Shane's overlooked message movie See more (15 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Vittorio Gassman ... Peter Kaban

Gloria Grahame ... Maggie Summers

Ann Robinson ... Nancy
Douglas Spencer ... Inspector Bailey
Robin Raymond ... Tanya aka Bella Zakoyla

Jerry Paris ... Tom
Elizabeth Slifer ... Mrs. Hinckley - Landlady
Richard Reeves ... Eddie Hinckley

Joe Turkel ... Freddie Zakoyla (as Joseph Turkel)
Else Neft ... Mrs. Zakoyla
Michael Fox ... Inspector Toomey / Narrator

Nesdon Booth ... Monroe - Taxi Driver (as Ned Booth)

Kathleen Freeman ... Zelda - Fat Woman
Juney Ellis ... Girl friend
Jack Teagarden ... Musician

Shorty Rogers ... Himself - Band Leader
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Richard Collier ... Giggling Man in Arcade (uncredited)
Sayre Dearing ... Nightclub Extra (uncredited)
Roy Engel ... Police News Broadcaster (uncredited)
Sammy Finn ... Restaurant Patron (uncredited)
Alvin Freeman ... Street Dancer (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Dock Inspector (uncredited)
Lou Krugman ... Club Manager (uncredited)
Joseph Mell ... Musician in Men's Room (uncredited)
Frank Mills ... Taxi Driver's Pal (uncredited)
Richard Monda ... Louis - Street Dancer (uncredited)
Dorothy Neumann ... Zelda's Friend (uncredited)
Barney Phillips ... Police Lieutenant Reeves (uncredited)

'Snub' Pollard ... Man in Alley with Tall Showgirl (uncredited)
Valerie Vernon ... Minor Role (uncredited)
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Directed by
Maxwell Shane 
 
Writing credits
Ivan Tors (screenplay) and
Maxwell Shane (screenplay)

Produced by
Ben Coleman .... associate producer (as Ben Colman)
Ivan Tors .... producer
 
Original Music by
Leith Stevens 
 
Cinematography by
Joseph F. Biroc 
 
Film Editing by
Stanley Frazen 
Herbert L. Strock 
 
Production Design by
George Van Marter 
 
Art Direction by
Serge Krizman 
 
Production Management
C.M. Florance .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Ben Berk .... assistant director: New York unit
Richard Dixon .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
William A. Wilmarth .... sound
 
Special Effects by
David Commons .... special effects
Jack Rabin .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Bobby Jones .... lighting effects (as Robert Jones)
 
Editorial Department
Stanley Frazen .... supervising editor
 
Music Department
Gus Levene .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 

Production CompaniesDistributors
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
82 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Ann Robinson's first credited film.See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: During his first solo, trombonist Jack Teagarden's hand movements don't match the music on the soundtrack.See more »
Quotes:
Mrs. Zakoyla:Don't forget, your dead father was a lousy foreigner!See more »

FAQ

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8 out of 10 people found the following review useful.
A vividly raffish New York City comes to life in Maxwell Shane's overlooked message movie, 28 February 2004
Author: bmacv from Western New York

A pungent period flavor of post-war New York elevates Maxwell Shane's The Glass Wall. If it's not quite noir (its idealism disqualifies it), it sure looks and feels like noir. As well it should, coming from the writer/director of those unambiguous noirs Fear in the Night (1947) and its remake Nightmare (1956).

In his first American film, Vittorio Gassman plays a stateless stowaway who's caught before his ship sails into New York harbor. Detained by immigration authorities, who won't believe his story that he qualifies for special consideration for aiding the Allies during the war, he's due to be returned to Trieste and certain death. But he jumps from the deck onto the docks, smashing his ribs, and starts stumbling around the city looking for the G.I. who can vouch for him (Jerry Paris). All Gassman knows is Paris' first name, and that he plays clarinet somewhere near Times Square (when we catch up with Paris, he's auditioning for Jack Teagarden's band).

During his nocturnal search, he runs into Gloria Grahame, who's very down on her luck. A sharp little minx who used to affix the tips to shoelaces for a living, now she steals coats from Automats (it's one of her more captivating performances). Grahame's at first wary of Gassman but quickly won over – his tale of woe makes her troubles look paltry, and he's the first guy to treat her decently. So she lets him hide out in her garret room (his escape makes the front pages) and helps him search for his old pal.

There's a beat-the-clock element that keeps the story moving: Gassman doesn't know that Paris has seen the tabloids and will vouch for him – or that his options will expire at dawn. And Shane stews the path with obstacles as well as with good Samaritans (Robin Raymond as a stripper with a heart of gold – another `Hunkie' – touchingly among them).

As the sky lightens, the desperate Gassman reaches the place he thinks will be his salvation: The forbidding `glass wall' of Wallace K. Harrison's just-completed United Nations Headquarters. But the building's empty of all but janitors, and Gassman still doesn't know that he's still safe....

The Glass Wall's a modest movie that overcomes the handicaps of its dated and idealistic `message' to succeed as a well told and acted human interest story. But it triumphs in its presentation of mid-20th-century Manhattan, as vividly raffish as in any movie of its period.

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