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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 40 | slideshow) Videos (see all 4)
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes -- Trailer for this glamorous musical
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes -- Clip: Diamond Tiara
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes -- Clip: Diamonds Are A Girl's Best Friend

Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   18,716 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Charles Lederer (screen play)
Joseph Fields (based on the musical comedy by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
August 1953 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The Two M-M-Marvels Of Our Age In The Wonder Musical Of The World!
Plot:
Singers Lorelei Lee and Dorothy Shaw travel to Paris, pursued by a private detective hired by the disapproving father of Lorelei's fiancé to keep an eye on her, as well as a rich, enamored old man and many other doting admirers. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(229 articles)
Read Marilyn Monroe's Very Racy Love Letter from Arthur Miller
 (From PEOPLE.com. 20 November 2014, 7:15 AM, PST)

Read Marilyn Monroe's Very Racy Love Letter from Arthur Miller
 (From PEOPLE.com. 20 November 2014, 7:15 AM, PST)

Vanessa Hudgens Stars in Gigi: First Look
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User Reviews:
"I want to marry him for YOUR money!" See more (125 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Jane Russell ... Dorothy Shaw

Marilyn Monroe ... Lorelei Lee

Charles Coburn ... Sir Francis 'Piggy' Beekman

Elliott Reid ... Ernie Malone

Tommy Noonan ... Gus Esmond Jr.
George Winslow ... Henry Spofford III

Marcel Dalio ... Magistrate
Taylor Holmes ... Mr. Esmond Sr.

Norma Varden ... Lady Beekman
Howard Wendell ... Watson
Steven Geray ... Hotel Manager
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alex Akimoff ... Captain of Waiters (uncredited)
Aladdin ... Musician (uncredited)
Patricia Barker ... Small Role (uncredited)
Virginia Bates ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Wallace Bickmore ... Small Role (uncredited)
Herman Boden ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Julio Bonini ... Small Role (uncredited)
Jack Boyle ... Passenger (uncredited)
Harris Brown ... Small Role (uncredited)
Edward C. Browne ... Small Role (uncredited)
William Cabanne ... Sims (uncredited)
Peter Camlin ... Gendarme (uncredited)

Harry Carey Jr. ... Winslow - Olympic Team (uncredited)

George Chakiris ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Jack Chefe ... Proprietor (uncredited)
John Close ... Coach (uncredited)
Harold E. Coates ... Small Role (uncredited)
Robert Cole ... Small Role (uncredited)
Joan Collenette ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Gene Dailey ... Small Role (uncredited)
Becky Davis ... Small Role (uncredited)
Drusilla Davis ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
George Davis ... Pierre - Cab Driver (uncredited)
Jean De Briac ... Gendarme (uncredited)
Charles De Ravenne ... Purser (uncredited)
George Dee ... Gendarme (uncredited)
Josette Deegan ... French Stewardess (uncredited)
Jean Del Val ... Ship's Captain (uncredited)
Frank Dernhammer ... Small Role (uncredited)
Bobby Diamond ... Small Role (uncredited)
Deena Dikkers ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Jack Dodds ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Arthur Dulac ... Small Role (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Chez Louis Nightclub Patron (uncredited)
George Ford ... Small Role (uncredited)
Robert Foulk ... Passport Official (uncredited)
Alex Frazer ... Pritchard (uncredited)
Raoul Freeman ... Hotel Doorman (uncredited)
Joel Friend ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)

Robert Fuller ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Ed Fury ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)
Kay Garrett ... Passenger (uncredited)
A. Cameron Grant ... Small Role (uncredited)
Bennett Green ... Waiter (uncredited)
Stanley Hall ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
John Hedloe ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)

Chuck Hicks ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)
Casse Jaeger ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Richard Kean ... Small Role (uncredited)
Dorothy Kellogg ... Passenger (uncredited)
Colin Kenny ... Wedding Guest (uncredited)
Larry Kert ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Tommy Ladd ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Richard LaMarr ... Small Role (uncredited)
Judy Landon ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Lisa Lang ... Small Role (uncredited)
Joan Larkin ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Henri Letondal ... Grotier (uncredited)
Ray Long ... Small Role (uncredited)
Shirley Lopez ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Herb Lurie ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Warren Mace ... Passenger (uncredited)
Johnny Marlin ... Small Role (uncredited)
Alphonse Martell ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Erin Martin ... Small Role (uncredited)
Matt Mattox ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Reed Maxcy ... Small Role (uncredited)
Ray Montgomery ... Peters - Olympic Team (uncredited)
Alvy Moore ... Winston - Olympic Team (uncredited)
Roger Moore ... Chauffeur (uncredited)
Donald Moray ... Airport Porter (uncredited)
Leo Mostovoy ... Phillipe (uncredited)
Fred Moultrie ... Boy Dancer (uncredited)
James Moultrie ... Boy Dancer (uncredited)

Noel Neill ... Passenger (uncredited)
Robert Nichols ... Evans (uncredited)

Ron Nyman ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Gayle Pace ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)
Alfred Paix ... Pierre (uncredited)
Stephen Papich ... French Waiter (uncredited)
Ralph Peters ... Passport Official (uncredited)
Manuel Petroff ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Frank Radcliffe ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Ellen Ray ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)

Steve Reeves ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)
Barry Regan ... Passenger (uncredited)
Jack Regas ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Mel Robin ... Small Role (uncredited)
John Robinson ... Small Role (uncredited)
Don M. Rosenstock ... Small Role (uncredited)
James H. Russell ... Olympic Team Member (uncredited)
Loulette Sablon ... Small Role (uncredited)
Rolfe Sedan ... Waiter (uncredited)
Harry Seymour ... Louie - Captain of Waiters (uncredited)
Peggy Smith ... Passenger (uncredited)
Roberta Stevenson ... Chorus Girl (uncredited)
Robert Street ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
F. Philip Sylvestre ... Steward (uncredited)
Charles Tannen ... Ed - Malone's Contact (uncredited)
Marlina Tepel ... Small Role (uncredited)
Lee Theodore ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Stagehand (uncredited)
Ray Weaver ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Dick Wessel ... Chez Louis Nightclub Patron (uncredited)
Leo Wheeler ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Marc Wilder ... Chorus Boy (uncredited)
Max Willenz ... Court Clerk (uncredited)
Don Wilson ... Trailer Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
James Young ... Stevens - Olympic Team (uncredited)

Directed by
Howard Hawks 
 
Writing credits
Charles Lederer (screen play)

Joseph Fields (based on the musical comedy by) and
Anita Loos (based on the musical comedy by)

Produced by
Sol C. Siegel .... producer
 
Original Music by
Leigh Harline (uncredited)
Lionel Newman (uncredited)
Hal Schaefer (uncredited)
Herbert W. Spencer (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Harry J. Wild (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Hugh S. Fowler (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
Joseph C. Wright 
 
Set Decoration by
Claude E. Carpenter (set decorations) (as Claude Carpenter)
 
Costume Design by
Travilla (costumes designed by)
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Allan Snyder .... makeup artist: Miss Monroe (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Paul Helmick .... assistant director
Don Torpin .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
E. Clayton Ward .... sound
 
Visual Effects by
Ray Kellogg .... special photographic effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Clyde Taylor .... gaffer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Le Maire .... wardrobe director (as Charles Le Maïre)
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Joan Joseff .... costume jewelry (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
James Blakeley .... post-production coordinator (uncredited)
Lyman Hallowell .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Eliot Daniel .... vocal director
Earle Hagen .... orchestrator
Bernard Mayers .... orchestrator
Lionel Newman .... musical director
Leo Robin .... music and lyrics by
Herbert W. Spencer .... orchestrator (as Herbert Spencer)
Jule Styne .... music and lyrics by
Jack Dumont .... musician (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Jack Cole .... choreographer
Leonard Doss .... technicolor color consultant
Herman Levin .... presented on the stage by
Oliver Smith .... presented on the stage by
Doris Drought .... script clerk (uncredited)
Marni Nixon .... voice double: high notes for Marilyn Monroe (uncredited)
Lorraine Sherwood .... dialogue coach (uncredited)
Richard A. Smith .... technical advisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Howard Hawks' Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" - UK (complete title), USA (complete title)
See more »
Runtime:
91 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
For this film Gwen Verdon coached stars Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe in both their dance and walk - Monroe with less sex, Russell with more. It's rumored that at one point in the film, Verdon dubs both Monroe's and Russell's swaying bottoms.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): During the "Ain't there anyone here for Love?" number, when Dorothy is walking between the two lines of athletes doing knee-bends, one of the men on the left towards the back gets up too late and fails to do his bend in time with the others.See more »
Quotes:
Lorelei Lee:Excuse me, but what is the way to Europe, France?
Dorothy Shaw:Honey, France is IN Europe.
Lorelei Lee:Well, who said it wasn't?
Dorothy Shaw:Well... you wouldn't say you wanted to go to North America, Mexico.
Lorelei Lee:If that's where I wanted to go, I would.
Dorothy Shaw:[to the Ticket Checker in exasperation] The dealer passes.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Wild at Heart (1990)See more »
Soundtrack:
When Love Goes WrongSee more »

FAQ

Is the song 'Down Boy' a deleted number and where was it deleted from?
Was Marilyn Monroe a natural blonde?
Is there a Cinemascope version of the 'Diamonds' Number?
See more »
70 out of 84 people found the following review useful.
"I want to marry him for YOUR money!", 27 July 2001

Anyone who's ever written off Marilyn Monroe as "just" a dumb blonde are directed to this film immediately. Yes, at first glance, Lorelei Lee is a brainless piece of fluff, given to such malapropisms as "Pardon me, please, is this the boat to Europe, France?" But upon closer inspection, this girl is no dummy. Rather remarkably for the chauvinist times, Lorelei and Dorothy (played by the incredibly underrated Jane Russell) do things on their own terms, and when Lorelei "plays dumb," it's because she knows that's what men expect--and she uses it to her advantage. But enough of the heavy analysing; above all, "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" is FUN! It's clearly of the Fox, rather than the MGM, school of musicals--MGM made the "art" musicals ("An American in Paris," "Singin' in the Rain"), while Fox made the "vulgar" ones ("There's No Business Like Show Business"). From the opening number ("Two Little Girls from Little Rock"), we know we're in for a visually opulent, noveau riche zircon of entertainment--witness the gaudy black, red and blue color scheme. Lorelei and Dorothy's costumes are at the extreme end of 50's fashion; designer Travilla will never go down as a contemporary of Dior or Balenciaga, but as a precursor to Bob Mackie. And yet, this is still a very funny (and essentially very warm) movie. There are few screen friendships as believable and as lovable as Lorelei and Dorothy's--maybe only Lucy and Ethel's on the small screen really surpasses it. "Let's get this straight," Dorothy warns, "nobody ever talks about Lorelei except ME." And Lorelei returns the compliment: "Dorothy is the best, loyalest friend a girl could ever have." Pretty heartwarming stuff! In a nutshell, Lorelei and Dorothy are nightclub entertainers who head for Paris when Lorelei's romance with millionaire Mr. Esmond (Tommy Noonan) flounders due to his father's interference. Shipboard, Dorothy is romanced by Malone (Elliot Reid), who, unbeknowst to the girls, is a private detective hired by Esmond to keep an eye out for potential scandal. Meanwhile, Lorelei meets Lord Beekman, aka "Piggy" (Charles Coburn), probably the dirtiest dirty old man in the history of film. Piggy just happens to own the 2nd largest diamond mine in South Africa, and soon enough, Lorelei is coveting the gorgeous diamond tiara owned by Piggy's wife, Lady Beekman (Norma Varden). Various mixups and mayhem ensues, with Lorelei and Dorothy eventually stranded in Paris. And that's where Marilyn Monroe gives her penultimate performance: the legendary "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend" sequence. Even today, after scores of parodies and tributes, this number captivates. Not since Rita Hayworth's "Put the Blame on Mame" in "Gilda" was there such an intoxicatingly sexy marriage between star, song and persona. In this number, Marilyn is by turns playful, alluring, seductive and charming, but NEVER conniving or hard-edged. And therein lies her appeal: even when proclaiming "I prefer a man who lives and gives expensive jewels!", Marilyn is never anything less than adorable. She's not a gum-snapping, man-eating golddigger; she wants pretty things, and knows how to get them--but not at the expense of being nice. She may peruse passenger lists with single-minded focus ("Any man with '...and valet' after his name is definitely worthwhile"), but she's still a likable character WITH a motivation behind her actions--which always remain entirely innocent. Special note must be made here, too, of Jane Russell's contributions to this film (not the least of which is her seen-to-be-believed solo, "Ain't There Anyone Here for Love," in which she's surrounded by posterior-pumping beefcake). It would've been very easy for Russell to either throw the film entirely to Monroe, or push too hard for her own spotlight at the expense of onscreen warmth and camraederie. Wisely, Russell does neither. She simply turns in a snappy, effortless comic performance that more than holds its own, and projects a marvelous sense of sisterhood in her scenes with Monroe. This is a small comic, musical gem; the sum is greater than its parts (the songs themselves are weak; the comedy is sometimes obvious), but you cannot deny its sheer entertainment value. This is a perfect example of star power (Monroe's AND Russell's) turning a rhinestone into a diamond.

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Jane Russel: Bloke in Drag lovethathat
relay team's swim shorts sleepybears
How are we supposed to feel about Lorelei? FilmKoala
Diamonds are a girls best friend(alternative version) lostiscool-1
This movie should have been called... moviebuff909
FANNY BRICE IN 'BE YOURSELF' BG43214
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