7.7/10
36,281
159 user 106 critic

From Here to Eternity (1953)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance, War | 19 October 1953 (Brazil)
In Hawaii in 1941, a private is cruelly punished for not boxing on his unit's team, while his captain's wife and second-in-command are falling in love.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (based upon the novel by)
Reviews
Popularity
4,138 ( 1,565)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Won 8 Oscars. Another 14 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Sgt. Ike Galovitch
...
Sal Anderson
Tim Ryan ...
Sgt. Pete Karelsen
Arthur Keegan ...
...
Edit

Storyline

It's 1941. Robert E. Lee Prewitt has requested Army transfer and has ended up at Schofield in Hawaii. His new captain, Dana Holmes, has heard of his boxing prowess and is keen to get him to represent the company. However, 'Prew' is adamant that he doesn't box anymore, so Captain Holmes gets his subordinates to make his life a living hell. Meanwhile Sergeant Warden starts seeing the captain's wife, who has a history of seeking external relief from a troubled marriage. Prew's friend Maggio has a few altercations with the sadistic stockade Sergeant 'Fatso' Judson, and Prew begins falling in love with social club employee Lorene. Unbeknownst to anyone, the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor looms in the distance. Written by Ed Sutton <esutton@mindspring.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Pouring out of impassioned pages...brawling their way to greatness on the screen! See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

19 October 1953 (Brazil)  »

Also Known As:

De aquí a la eternidad  »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,650,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Color:

(archive footage)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Montgomery Clift's intensity extended to an obsessive drive to have every detail down right. He spent long hours of practice on military drills. He copied Jamie Jones' mannerisms and speech patterns. He insisted on playing his bugle loudly and repeatedly, even though he was dubbed, so that he would accurately appear to be playing it on screen. Fred Zinnemann's wife Renee, said, "He worked so hard at all of this that he was almost worn out by the time they started shooting." See more »

Goofs

During Sgt. Warden's visit (pretending to look for Capt. Holmes), Karen tells him that she will phone her husband and walks to the dining room. When she stands in the doorway, we see two chairs inside, on the left. In the next shot, they both enter the room and the chairs are not there. See more »

Quotes

Sergeant Milton Warden: [to Sgt. James 'Fatso' Judson, holding a broken beer bottle neck] O.K. Fatso, if it's killin' ya want, come on.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: SCHOFIELD BARRACKS HAWAII 1941 See more »

Connections

Referenced in Countdown: Episode #73.117 (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Taps
(1862) (uncredited)
Music by Daniel Butterfield
Played by a bugler at bedtime
Reprised on bugle by Pvt. Lee
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
The definitive Pearl Harbor film
26 October 2001 | by (Las Vegas, NV) – See all my reviews

Michael Bay's "Pearl Harbor" is so inferior in every aspect of filmmaking to "From Here to Eternity" that the two films shouldn't even be mentioned in the same sentence together. "From Here to Eternity" boasts an absolutely legendary cast that delivers one of the finest composite performances of all time. Just try comparing Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift to Ben Affleck and Josh Hartnett - not even close to a fair fight. Throw in Frank Sinatra in an Oscar winning supporting role and you've got a classic that truly stands the test of time. The tight script portrays real, fleshed-out relationships that are equal parts passionate and tragic. And both Deborah Kerr and Donna Reed are luminous. For some reason this film gets ignored or forgotten when the greatest films of all time are mentioned; all you need to do is watch it again after "Pearl Harbor" and you'll realize what a mistake that is. "From Here to Eternity" easily stands with the greatest films in history.


81 of 106 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?