5.7/10
49
5 user 1 critic

Born to the Saddle (1953)

Approved | | Western | 15 March 1953 (USA)
When a young man agrees to race a wonderful quarter horse, a crooked, wife abusing, gambler has plans to sabotage the contest.

Director:

Writers:

(novel) (as Gordon Young), (screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Bob Marshall
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Matt Daggett
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John Grant
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Bill Walton
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Kate Daggett
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Tom Roper
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Ricky Summers (as Bob Anderson)
Milton Kibbee ...
Doctor Granden
Boyd Davis ...
Judge Trumbull
Lucille Thompson ...
Doris
Dolores Prest ...
Jerri Marshall
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Jeff Sanger
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Sheriff
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Storyline

Bent on revenge for the death of his father and the theft of their ranch, young Bill Walton rides into town seeking the aid of his uncle. As he rides into town, he takes a bullet meant for gambler Matt Daggett and across the street lies his uncle, victim of the gambler's gun. Dagget looks on Bill as 'good luck' and nurses him back to health and gives him the job of training "Blue Chip", the fastest quarter horse in the west, for a big race. Bill doesn't know that Dagget plans to fix the race and put his own money on another horse at heavy odds. Quartered at the nearby ranch of John Grant, Bill meets Jerri Marshall, daughter of Bob Marshall, who lost "Blue Chip" to Daggett in a crooked gambling deal. Grant gets mixed up in a stage coach robbery and killing and rides back to the ranch with Daggett henchman Red Roper. When Roper tries to molest a woman, Bill bluffs him with an empty gun and forces him back to town. Roper is arrested for the killing and implicates Grant. Incited by ... Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Filmed in the COLORS of the GREAT OUTDOORS! He Rides Like Crazy...and Shoots Like Blazes! See more »

Genres:

Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 March 1953 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Im Sattel geboren  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Trucolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Great story with good performances and directing, and even better riding

Even though he had been in 13 movies before "Born to the Saddle," he was credited here with "Introducing Chuck Courtney."

Chuck Courtney was by no means the biggest name, and he didn't carry off the acting honors, but he was quite obviously the real rider and real stunt rider: Part of what earns "Born to the Saddle" a 10-star rating was Courtney's trick mounts.

Was he a born Westerner? Well, yes: He was born in Los Angeles. And you can't be born much farther west.

I always hate to admit to any lack of knowledge when it comes to Western movies, but I had not heard of him before watching this YouTube movie in April of 2017. Since watching him in this, I did a bit of research. Chuck Courtney was a busy actor, in movies and TV, with such roles as the Lone Ranger's nephew, and as Davod in "Star Trek."

And he did a lot of stunts, obviously, judging from his performance in "Born to the Saddle," a very talented horse-man.

He was very ably accompanied in this movie by the beloved Rand Brooks, who might be most famous for either his role as Scarlett O'Hara's first husband in "Gone With the Wind," or his role as Corporal Boone in the TV series "Adventures of Rin Tin Tin."

In my opinion, though, he out-did himself in "Born to the Saddle," playing a much tougher character than usual, and deserving all the praise he can get.

There were three strong women roles, the youngest being played by Dolores Prest, about whom nothing is known here, but she was really cute, very outgoing, and deserving, judging from this only known role, to have been a star.

Karen Morley was the central female, vied for by both of the male characters played by Donald Woods and Leif Ericson -- and all three kept our attention.

"Born to the Saddle" had an excellent story, by Gordon Young, with many levels of interesting characters, all well played and well directed.

There are several versions of this movie at YouTube, including one in the original Cinecolor, but it's jumpy and hard to watch. Do sample all the versions and find the one that plays best, but do watch "Born to the Saddle." You should be impressed and pleased.


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