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The Big Heat (1953) Poster

(1953)

Trivia

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Bannion's wife Katie is played by Jocelyn Brando, older sister of Marlon Brando.
Columbia wanted to borrow Marilyn Monroe from 20th Century-Fox to play the role of Debby Marsh, but Fox's asking price was too high. Gloria Grahame was cast instead.
When Lee Marvin first sees Glenn Ford face to face, the music in the background is "Put the Blame on Mame," a reference to Ford's performance in Gilda (1946).
The portrait of Lagana's mother is of Celia Lovsky, actress and ex wife of Peter Lorre.
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Upon initial release Modern Screen magazine described this as a 'Family Film', an obvious error.
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The fictional city where the story takes place is named Kenport.
Columbia paid $40,000 for the short story.
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Executive Producer Jerry Wald hoped to cast either Paul Muni, George Raft or Edward G. Robinson in the lead role.
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Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
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Actor Rex Reason was originally cast in this movie to portray Tierney or Detective Burke, but his agent was negotiating for him to play a bigger role in it, possibly that of Lee Marvin's villain, but since there was no agreement reached, Reason did not appear in the movie, even though some 1950s era books and magazines sources give him credit for this movie.
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The film is included on Roger Ebert's "Great Movies" list.
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Made its New York television premiere 21 January 1967 on WCBS channel 2.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

One of only a handful of movies made in the so-called golden age of Hollywood, that hasn't had it's original 15 certificate rescinded or lowered by the British Board of Film Classification. This means that the film cannot be viewed legally in the United Kingdom by anyone under the age of 15. Although it may be considered tame by today's standards, the film contains some scenes where extreme violence is graphically described, as well as the disturbing 'coffee pot' scene. Another movie from this period to still retain this particular age rating in Britain for the same reason, is 1949's White Heat.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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