"winky-dink and you" was the pioneer in interactive programming. The core of the program was children sent away for a kit. The kit had a plastic screen that stuck to the TV tube with static... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Jack Barry ...
 Host
Dayton Allen ...
 Mr. Bungle
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
 Winky Dink (voice)
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Storyline

"winky-dink and you" was the pioneer in interactive programming. The core of the program was children sent away for a kit. The kit had a plastic screen that stuck to the TV tube with static electricity. Crayons were used to draw on the screen. When a character needed special help, children would be asked to draw on the screen, give assistance and free the character from trouble. If a character needed to cross a river with no bridge, the viewer would draw a line so a crossing could be made and escape trouble. Jack Barry, the host, emphasized inviting a friend over to watch the program; sharing in the drawing of assistance was also important. Everyone watched and helped winky-dinky in his adventures and had fun. Written by alfred, south carolina

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Genres:

Family | Animation

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Release Date:

10 October 1953 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the first interactive T.V. shows. Young viewers could send for a special plastic sheet that clung to the television screen, and crayons for drawing thereupon. Children were encouraged to draw on the screen in order to assist in telling a Winky-Dink adventure story. See more »

Connections

Followed by Winky Dink and You! (1969) See more »

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User Reviews

Gabe Kaplan
4 May 2008 | by See all my reviews

I never saw the show, but Gabe Kaplan discussed it in his stand-up routine, which could be heard on his comedy album "Holes and Mello-Rolls". "Mello-Rolls" also had the stand-up bit which was later developed into "Welcome Back Kotter."

Kaplan mentioned he was a fan of the show as a kid, but like most kids, never bothered to get the "magic drawing screen" sold, and instead just drew directly on the TV screen, and did not erase his drawings. His father would be annoyed to find that Gabe had been watching Winky-Dink again, cursing the cartoon that had encouraged his kid to draw all over the TV screen.


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