IMDb > The Winning Team (1952)
The Winning Team
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Winning Team (1952) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 10 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
6.5/10   566 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Up 5% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Ted Sherdeman (screenplay) and
Seeleg Lester (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Winning Team on IMDbPro.
Genre:
Tagline:
The true story of Grover Cleveland Alexander! See more »
Plot:
Poor health and alcoholism force Grover Cleveland Alexander out of baseball, but through his wife's faithful efforts, he gets a chance for a comeback and redemption. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
The first half of this film is reasonably true--the second differs greatly from reality. See more (16 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Doris Day ... Aimee Alexander

Ronald Reagan ... Grover Cleveland Alexander
Frank Lovejoy ... Rogers Hornsby
Eve Miller ... Margaret Killefer
James Millican ... Bill Killefer

Russ Tamblyn ... Willie Alexander (as Rusty Tamblyn)
Gordon Jones ... George Glasheen
Hugh Sanders ... Joe McCarthy
Frank Ferguson ... Sam Arrants
Walter Baldwin ... Pa Alexander

Dorothy Adams ... Ma Alexander
Bob Lemon ... Jesse 'Pop' Haines
Jerry Priddy ... Ballplayer
Peanuts Lowery ... Ballplayer (as Peanuts Lowrey)
George Metkovich ... Ballplayer
Irv Noren ... Ballplayer (as Irving Noren)
Hank Sauer ... Ballplayer
Al Zarilla ... Ballplayer
Gene Mauch ... Ballplayer
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Harry Lauter ... Eddie Collins (replaced by Lee Roberts) (scenes deleted)
Sam Bagley ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Frank Baker ... Fan Outside Stadium (uncredited)
Richard Bartell ... Johnny - Bartender (uncredited)
Rodney Bell ... Reporter (uncredited)
John Beradino ... Sherdel, Cardinals Player (uncredited)
Henry Blair ... Batboy (uncredited)
Larry J. Blake ... Detective Blake (uncredited)
Ward Brant ... Fan (uncredited)
Ralph Brooks ... McNamee's Assistant (uncredited)
Morgan Brown ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Jack Carr ... Angry Fan (uncredited)
Jess Cavin ... Central City Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Dick Cherney ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Russ Clark ... Umpire (uncredited)
Gordon B. Clarke ... Pianist in Speakeasy (uncredited)
Paul Cristo ... Clerk (uncredited)
Tom Daley ... Reporter (uncredited)
Steve Darrell ... Doan, Manager of House of David Baseball Team (uncredited)
Jimmie Dodd ... Fred (uncredited)
Tom Dugan ... Cigar Stand Owner (uncredited)
Bonnie Kay Eddy ... Grover's Sister (uncredited)
Adolph Faylauer ... Listener (uncredited)

Pat Flaherty ... Bill Klem - Umpire (uncredited)
Alan Foster ... Customer (uncredited)
Ralph Gamble ... Announcer (uncredited)
Lou Gehrig ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Art Gilmore ... Radio Sports Announcer (voice) (uncredited)
Tom Greenway ... Telephone Lineman Foreman (uncredited)
Herman Hack ... Townsman (uncredited)
Signe Hack ... Townswoman (uncredited)
John Hedloe ... Reporter (uncredited)
Thomas Browne Henry ... Carlson Carlton, Lecturer (uncredited)
Lars Hensen ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Tex Holden ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Jimmie Horan ... Townsman (uncredited)
Charles Horvath ... Telephone Lineman (uncredited)
Art Howard ... Listener (uncredited)
Dick Johnstone ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
William Kalvino ... Batter (uncredited)
Fred Kelsey ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
John Kennedy ... Announcer (uncredited)
Jack Kenney ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Donald Kerr ... Yankee Fan (uncredited)
Ann Kunde ... Townswoman (uncredited)
Bill Lovett ... Townsman (uncredited)
Dayton Lummis ... Graham McNamee (uncredited)
Herbert Lytton ... Opthamologist (uncredited)
Louis Manley ... Fire Eater (uncredited)
Mickey Mantle ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Frank Marlowe ... Taxi Driver (uncredited)
Kathy Marlowe ... Box Office Dame (uncredited)
Mathew McCue ... Carnival Patron (uncredited)
Frank McFarland ... Johnson (uncredited)
Joe McGuinn ... Doorman (uncredited)
Fred Millican ... Central City Catcher (uncredited)
King Mojave ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Jack Mower ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Leslie K. O'Pace ... Speakeasy Doorman (uncredited)
Robert Orrell ... Catcher (uncredited)
Artie Ortego ... Central City Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Arthur Page ... Preacher (uncredited)
Paul Panzer ... Central City Fan (uncredited)
Kenneth Patterson ... Dr. Johnson Conant (uncredited)
Joe Ploski ... Storekeeper (uncredited)
Murray Pollack ... Soldier (uncredited)
Allan Ray ... Reporter (uncredited)
Joey Ray ... Fan (uncredited)
Lee Roberts ... Eddie Collins (uncredited)
Robert Robinson ... Fan Outside Stadium (uncredited)

Babe Ruth ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Dick Ryan ... Midway Barker (uncredited)
Frank J. Scannell ... Carnival Sideshow Barker (uncredited)
Alex Sharp ... First Baseman (uncredited)
George Sherwood ... Rival Manager (uncredited)
Bill Slack ... Reporter (uncredited)
Ray Spiker ... Carnival Patron (uncredited)
Clarence Straight ... Sarcastic Reporter (uncredited)
Brick Sullivan ... Cop (uncredited)
Charles Sullivan ... Listener (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Arthur Tovey ... Carnival Patron (uncredited)
Glen Turnbull ... Reporter (uncredited)
Ralph Volkie ... Umpire (uncredited)
Billy Wayne ... Charles 'Red' Doonin, Philadelphia Nationals Manager (uncredited)
Jack Wilson ... Trainer (uncredited)
Tom Wilson ... Central City Baseball Fan (uncredited)
Allen Wood ... Usher (uncredited)
Pinky Woods ... Batter (uncredited)

Directed by
Lewis Seiler 
 
Writing credits
Ted Sherdeman (screenplay) and
Seeleg Lester (screenplay) &
Merwin Gerard (screenplay)

Seeleg Lester (story) and
Merwin Gerard (story)

Produced by
Bryan Foy .... producer
 
Original Music by
David Buttolph 
 
Cinematography by
Sidney Hickox  (as Sid Hickox)
 
Film Editing by
Alan Crosland Jr. 
 
Art Direction by
Douglas Bacon 
 
Set Decoration by
William L. Kuehl  (as William Kuehl)
 
Makeup Department
Gordon Bau .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Al Alleborn .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Russell Saunders .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Stanley Jones .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Hans F. Koenekamp .... special effects (as H.F. Koenekamp)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Leah Rhodes .... wardrobe
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (as Maurice de Packh)
 
Other crew
Aimee Alexander .... technical advisor (as Mrs. Grover Cleveland Alexander)
Emory Horger .... dialogue director (as Emory Hoerger)
Jerry Priddy .... technical advisor
Arnold 'Jigger' Statz .... technical advisor (as Arnold Statz)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
98 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Australia:G | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Canada:G (video rating) | Finland:S | USA:Approved (certificate #15757)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
According to TMC Ronald Reagan had lobbied hard to play the title role in "The Stratton Story" but Warner Bothers didn't want to take a chance on a baseball film and passed on the project. After "The Stratton Story" became a huge hit they picked up the Grover Cleveland Alexander story about another ball player who made a comeback after being forced from professional baseball.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: 1916 is shown as the year of Alexander leading the Phillies to the pennant, when the correct year was 1915.See more »
Quotes:
Sideshow heckler:How does it feel to be livin' off the fleas?
Grover Cleveland Alexander:Well, it's better than havin' 'em live offa me.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Diamonds on the Silver Screen (1992) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
For He's a Jolly Good FellowSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
2 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
The first half of this film is reasonably true--the second differs greatly from reality., 19 October 2012
Author: planktonrules from Bradenton, Florida

When film began, Grover Cleveland Alexander was a teenager--while Ronald Reagan was almost 40! singing?! This is a biopic about the career of one of the greatest pitchers in major league history, Grover Cleveland Alexander. If you look at the man's statistics, they are staggeringly impressive. Because of this and Alexander's later medical issues, it's not at all surprising they made this film. What is rather surprising, however, is that they chose Ronald Reagan to play the man. When the film began, he was supposed to be a very young man--while Reagan was nearly 40! He did fine in the role, however.

The first half of the film sticks reasonably close to the facts. If anything, it underplayed the greatness of the man (such as not even mentioning his three consecutive 30 win seasons and winning the triple-crown three times). However, around the middle of the film, the story gets hokey--and deviates very far from the truth. While Alexander did have problems with epilepsy and alcohol following his stint in WWI, the film made it look like his life and career fell apart. It also shows him being out of major league ball for some time until he cleaned himself up--but this just isn't true. He never had a losing season and still had excellent statistics until his final season in ball (when he was 43)--and the lengthy downward spiral in the film just never happened. With a career record of 373 and 208, he clearly was no bum! Overall, "The Winning Team" is a highly enjoyable and highly inaccurate and sensationalized film. While I do recommend it (it's well made and interesting), it seems sad that a great man's life was so distorted just to see a few extra tickets. But, that was pretty common for Hollywood during this era.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (16 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Winning Team (1952)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Two Presidents in one joepozz
The Gipper could really throw a baseball! kelkyl
No Spellcheck in 1952 abramsa
'HELP!' How can I see this film??? cannescrwrtr
Premiere beatlefreak28
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Stratton Story The Best Years of Our Lives Rookie of the Year Dizzy & Daffy Never Among Friends
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Biography section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.