IMDb > We're Not Married! (1952)
We're Not Married!
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We're Not Married! (1952) More at IMDbPro »

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We're Not Married! -- Trailer for this comedy about a man who marries couples without the authority to do so

Overview

User Rating:
6.4/10   1,171 votes »
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Down 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)
Dwight Taylor (adaptation)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for We're Not Married! on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 December 1952 (France) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
In separate stories, five wedded couples learn that they are not legally married. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Big Radios, Beauty Pageants, and a War in Korea See more (18 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Ginger Rogers ... Ramona Gladwyn
Fred Allen ... Steven S. 'Steve' Gladwyn
Victor Moore ... Justice of the Peace Melvin Bush

Marilyn Monroe ... Annabel Jones Norris

David Wayne ... Jeff Norris

Eve Arden ... Katie Woodruff

Paul Douglas ... Hector C. Woodruff

Eddie Bracken ... Wilson Boswell 'Willie' Fisher

Mitzi Gaynor ... Patricia 'Patsy' Reynolds Fisher

Louis Calhern ... Frederick C. 'Freddie' Melrose

Zsa Zsa Gabor ... Eve Melrose (as ZsaZsa Gabor)

James Gleason ... Duffy

Paul Stewart ... Attorney Stone

Jane Darwell ... Mrs. Bush
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Walter Brennan ... Handsome (scenes deleted)
Marvelle Andre ... State Capitol Secretary (uncredited)
Harry Antrim ... Justice of the Peace (uncredited)
Jean Bartel ... Bit (uncredited)
Carol Brewster ... Bridesmaid (uncredited)
Al Bridge ... Det. Magnus (uncredited)
June Bright ... Secretary (uncredited)

Paul Brinegar ... Beauty Contest Spectator (uncredited)
Douglas Brooks ... (uncredited)
Phyllis Brunner ... Wife (uncredited)
Richard Buckley ... Mr. H.D. Graves (uncredited)
James Burke ... Willie's Sergeant (uncredited)
Barbara Carroll ... (uncredited)
Harry Carter ... Hotel Staffer (uncredited)
Sue Casey ... Girl in Hector's Dream (uncredited)
Maurice Cass ... Radio Station Organist (uncredited)
John Close ... Major (uncredited)
Dick Cogan ... Telegraph Agent (uncredited)
Walter Craig ... (uncredited)
Luther Crockett ... Minister (uncredited)
Jack Daly ... Photographer (uncredited)
Robert Dane ... Military Policeman at Railroad Station (uncredited)
Fred Datig Jr. ... Soldier (uncredited)
Jack Davidson ... Best man at wedding (uncredited)
Ralph Dumke ... Twitchell (uncredited)
Kay English ... Wife (uncredited)
Henry Faber ... State Trooper (uncredited)
Eddie Firestone ... Man in Radio Station (uncredited)
Byron Foulger ... Marriage License Bureau Clerk (uncredited)
Harry Golder ... Radio Announcer (uncredited)
William Graeff Jr. ... Bellboy (uncredited)
Alvin Greenman ... Radio Station Sound Effects Man (uncredited)

Dabbs Greer ... Beauty Contest Spectator (uncredited)
Jester Hairston ... Lead Christmas Caroler (uncredited)
Bill Hale ... Officer Vic (uncredited)
Ruth Hall ... Girl in Hector's Dream (uncredited)
Eden Hartford ... Girl in Hector's Dream (uncredited)
Harry Harvey ... Dr. Ned (uncredited)
Marjorie Holliday ... Secretary (uncredited)

Selmer Jackson ... Chaplain Hall (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Radio Station Prop Man (uncredited)
Meredith Leeds ... (uncredited)
Margie Liszt ... Irene on Radio (uncredited)
Wilbur Mack ... Norris Wedding Guest (uncredited)
Gregg Martell ... Soldier (uncredited)

Lee Marvin ... Pinky (uncredited)
Edwin Max ... Lunchroom Counterman (uncredited)
Winifred McPhie ... (uncredited)
Emile Meyer ... Beauty Contest Announcer (uncredited)
Jerry Miley ... Station master (uncredited)
Christopher Milne ... Bitsy Norris (uncredited)
Jonathan Milne ... Bitsy Norris (uncredited)
Diana Mumby ... (uncredited)
Forbes Murray ... Governor of Mississippi (uncredited)
Noreen Nash ... (uncredited)
Mary Newton ... Woman in Radio Station (uncredited)
Milicent Patrick ... Governor's Secretary (uncredited)
Murray Pollack ... Groom (uncredited)
Tom Powers ... Atty. Gen. Frank Bush (uncredited)
Steve Pritko ... Military Policeman at Railroad Station (uncredited)
Richard Reeves ... Brig Guard (uncredited)
Mavis Russell ... (uncredited)
Larry Stamps ... State Trooper (uncredited)
Helene Stanley ... Mary (uncredited)
Ann Staunton ... Wife (uncredited)
Robert Stevenson ... M.P. (uncredited)
Victor Sutherland ... Gov. Bush (uncredited)
Gloria Talbott ... Girl in Hector's Dream (uncredited)
Al Thompson ... Minister (uncredited)
George Wallace ... Shore Patrolman (uncredited)
Maude Wallace ... Autograph Hound (uncredited)
Marjorie Weaver ... Ruthie (uncredited)
O.Z. Whitehead ... Jeff's Postman (uncredited)
June Wurster ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Edmund Goulding 
 
Writing credits
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)

Dwight Taylor (adaptation)

Gina Kaus (story) and
Jay Dratler (story)

Produced by
Nunnally Johnson .... producer
 
Original Music by
Cyril J. Mockridge  (as Cyril Mockridge)
 
Cinematography by
Leo Tover (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Louis R. Loeffler  (as Louis Loeffler)
 
Art Direction by
Leland Fuller 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Claude E. Carpenter  (as Claude Carpenter)
Thomas Little 
 
Costume Design by
Elois Jenssen 
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Helen Turpin .... hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Gene Bryant .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Gerald Braun .... assistant director (uncredited)
Eli Dunn .... assistant director (uncredited)
Paul Helmick .... assistant director (uncredited)
Joseph E. Rickards .... assistant director (uncredited)
Erich von Stroheim Jr. .... assistant director (uncredited)
Henry Weinberger .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound (as Roger Heman)
 
Visual Effects by
Ray Kellogg .... special photographic effects
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Le Maire .... wardrobe director (as Charles LeMaire)
 
Editorial Department
Orven Schanzer .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Bernard Mayers .... orchestrator
Lionel Newman .... musical director
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Anthony Jowitt .... dialogue director (uncredited)
William Cameron Menzies .... montage director (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
86 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:G | Belgium:16 | Canada:PG (video rating) | Finland:S | Sweden:15 | UK:A (original rating) | UK:U (video rating) | USA:Approved (certificate #15704)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The archive background footage showing New York City's Broadway at night is vintage May-June 1935, judging from the film titles prominently displayed on various theatre marquees.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: In the scene where Zsa Zsa Gabor is laughing hysterically at how much money she is going to take her husband for, the abrupt cut shows her sullen for about ten seconds before she starts to laugh again.See more »
Quotes:
Ramona Gladwyn:Say one thing about our marriage. If there's such a thing as an un-jackpot, I've hit it!See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Hollywood Screen Tests: Take 1 (1999) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
PerfidiaSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
5 out of 6 people found the following review useful.
Big Radios, Beauty Pageants, and a War in Korea, 5 April 2009
Author: dougdoepke from Claremont, USA

It's a clever premise, but the results have dated rather badly. Unfortunately, the comedy level never reaches the sparkle it needs, though the opening vignette (Rogers and Allen) comes close. Perhaps that's not surprising given Director Goulding's credits, which suggest he's more at home with Bette Davis melodrama than with material of this sort. Also, I'm surprised a big-budget studio like Fox didn't film this in Technicolor, which would have added a lot to the atmospherics. Instead, we get dour gray tones that undercut the light-hearted mood, making the movie look older than it is. But then, 1952 was a year Hollywood was looking to retool in the face of TV's onslaught. The following year would see an explosion of wide- screen color beyond the reach of the livingroom tube. As a result, this comedy venture may have been caught in the transition.

To me, the Allen-Rogers sequence is the best. It's actually a rather scathing look at entertainment make-believe and the relentless assault of commercial advertising. In private life the two are barely speaking, while on radio they play a pair of happy marrieds who trade comic barbs in between pushing the sponsors' goofy products. It's rather deftly and bitingly done, even though the 57-year old Allen looks like he's been on a two-week bender. In passing—note that even though we see a number of living rooms, no TV's are in sight, only radios! This was Hollywood in its final stage of denial.

The other vignettes are mildly entertaining, with a look at a number of performers on the way up the ladder-- Monroe, Marvin, Wayne, Gaynor. Especially satisfying is the delicious opportunity the letter provides Calhern to turn the tables on the gold-digging Gabor and her grasping attorney. At least the screenplay had the good sense not to reconcile these two at the end. But notice how the script insists the others be reconciled in typical 50's happy ending style. This certainly rings hollow in the case of the feuding Allen-Rogers. Given a second chance, it's hard to see how they could possibly stay together. In the case of Douglas-Arden, the most incisive of the vignettes, they may be totally bored with one another (check the dinner scene), but are too complaisant to actually change. That strikes me as maybe not the funniest, but at least as the most realistic of the episodes.

Anyway, whatever the comedy lacks in sparkle, it is revealing of its time—radio, beauty pageants, war in Korea (implied in Bracken's troop ship). But I'm afraid that the clever premise plays better than the mild results.

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