IMDb > Viva Zapata! (1952)
Viva Zapata!
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Viva Zapata! (1952) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   6,116 votes »
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View company contact information for Viva Zapata! on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 August 1952 (West Germany) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A BANDIT WHO BECAME A LEGEND!...Roaring Story of Mexico's Tiger on a White Horse!
Plot:
The story of Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, who led a rebellion against the corrupt, oppressive dictatorship of president Porfirio Diaz in the early 20th century. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 2 wins & 8 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(3 articles)
Marlon Brando Dies at 80
 (From IMDb News. 2 July 2004)

Director Elia Kazan Dies at 94
 (From IMDb News. 29 September 2003)

Actor Anthony Quinn Dies At 86
 (From WENN. 4 June 2001)

User Reviews:
surprising performances, touching direction, good (not masterpiece) screen writing See more (43 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Marlon Brando ... Emiliano Zapata

Jean Peters ... Josefa Zapata

Anthony Quinn ... Eufemio Zapata

Joseph Wiseman ... Fernando Aguirre
Arnold Moss ... Don Nacio

Alan Reed ... Pancho Villa
Margo ... Soldadera
Harold Gordon ... Francisco Indalecio Madero
Lou Gilbert ... Pablo
Frank Silvera ... Victoriano Huerta
Florenz Ames ... Señor Espejo
Richard Garrick ... Old General
Fay Roope ... President Porfirio Diaz

Mildred Dunnock ... Señora Espejo
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Rico Alaniz ... Guard (uncredited)
Daniel Armijo ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Ross Bagdasarian ... Officer (uncredited)
Salvador Baguez ... Soldier (uncredited)
Abner Biberman ... Captain (uncredited)
John F. Bray ... (uncredited)
Enrique Cabrera ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Jack Carr ... Huerta's Aide (uncredited)
Edward Colmans ... Secretary (uncredited)
Miguel Contreras ... Mexican (uncredited)

Henry Corden ... Senior Officer (uncredited)

Frank DeKova ... Colonel Guajardo (uncredited)
Joe Dominguez ... Manuel (uncredited)
Larry Duran ... (uncredited)
Fernanda Eliscu ... Fuentes' Wife (uncredited)
Robert Filmer ... Captain of Rurales (uncredited)
William Frescas ... Minor Role (uncredited)
David Fresco ... Guard (uncredited)
Leonard George ... Husband (uncredited)

Bernie Gozier ... Zapatista (uncredited)
Joseph Granby ... (uncredited)
Joe Herrera ... Rurale (uncredited)
Ruben Holquin ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Harry Kingston ... (uncredited)
Marc Krah ... Officer (uncredited)
Will Kuluva ... Lazaro (uncredited)
George J. Lewis ... Rurale (uncredited)
Paul Lopez ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Peter Mamakos ... Soldier (uncredited)
Tiger Joe Marsh ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Charles Martinez ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Yolanda Mirelez ... Girl (uncredited)
Alex Montoya ... Rurale (uncredited)
Julia Montoya ... Wife (uncredited)
Daniel Núñez ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Nestor Paiva ... New General (uncredited)

Kumar Pallana ... Soldier (uncredited)
James Porta ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Pedro Regas ... Innocente (uncredited)
Ric Roman ... Manager (uncredited)
Fred Sadoff ... Soldier (uncredited)
Juan Saenz ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Danny Sands ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Henri Sidoni ... Driver (uncredited)

Henry Silva ... Hernandez - Peasant who challenges 'president' Zapata (uncredited)
Marc Snegoff ... (uncredited)
Marc Snow ... Attendant (uncredited)
Shooting Star ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Guy Thomajan ... Eduardo (uncredited)
Nick Thompson ... Delegate (uncredited)
Carlo Tricoli ... Photographer (uncredited)
Philip Van Zandt ... Commanding Officer (uncredited)
Nina Varela ... Aunt (uncredited)
Juan Varro ... Guard (uncredited)
Irving Winter ... Pepe (uncredited)

Directed by
Elia Kazan 
 
Writing credits
John Steinbeck 

Edgecumb Pinchon  uncredited

Produced by
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alex North 
 
Cinematography by
Joseph MacDonald  (as Joe MacDonald)
 
Film Editing by
Barbara McLean 
 
Art Direction by
Leland Fuller 
Lyle R. Wheeler  (as Lyle Wheeler)
 
Set Decoration by
Claude E. Carpenter  (as Claude Carpenter)
Thomas Little 
 
Costume Design by
Travilla 
 
Makeup Department
Ben Nye .... makeup artist
Charles Gemora .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Allan Snyder .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Lillian Ugrin .... hairdresser (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Max Golden .... assistant production manager (uncredited)
F.E. 'Johnny' Johnston .... unit production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Horace Hough .... assistant director (uncredited)
Robert R. Snody .... second unit director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Don B. Greenwood .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
W.D. Flick .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Fred Sersen .... special photographic effects
 
Stunts
Fred Carson .... stunt double (uncredited)
Larry Duran .... stunts (uncredited)
Bernie Gozier .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Hayward .... stunts (uncredited)
Roque Ybarra .... stunt rider (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Tina Menard .... casting assistant (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Le Maire .... wardrobe director
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Morris Harmell .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Ollie Hughes .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Ed Wynigear .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Lyman Hallowell .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Maurice De Packh .... orchestrator (as Maurice dePackh)
Alfred Newman .... musical director
 
Other crew
José R. Barcia .... instructor: Spanish (uncredited)
José R. Barcia .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Virgil Guerra .... stand-in: Marlon Brando (uncredited)
Tina Menard .... interpreter (uncredited)
Stanley Scheuer .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Juan José Segura .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Professor Sologuren .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Guy Thomajan .... assistant: Elia Kazan (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
113 min | Argentina:115 min | West Germany:104 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Recording)
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Both Anthony Quinn and Marlon Brando had played Stanley Kowalski in "A Streetcar Named desire" shortly before they were teamed here.See more »
Goofs:
Miscellaneous: When Emeliano is thrown on the slab in the middle of town so all could see what happens to revolutionaries at the end of the movie Brando's stomach could be seen heavily breathing even though he is supposed to be dead.See more »
Quotes:
Eufemio:I love you, but I do not like you.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Viva Zapatero! (2005)See more »

FAQ

Why isn't there a Region 1 US DVD available? Is there a rights issue or something?
See more »
2 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
surprising performances, touching direction, good (not masterpiece) screen writing, 26 April 2009
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

At first he doesn't look much like we remember him - Marlon Brando appears as his Mexican Emiliano Zapata with a stern face at the Mexico Priesidente demanding, simply, land rights and making sure boundaries can be drawn. His name is circled on the President's desk, not a good sign, and from here on in Zapata is fighting and fighting (what one character says is as simple as it is - it's all he knows) so that the farmers can have their land, as opposed to time and patience, to grow their corn with.

When Brando first appears as this revolutionary figure he doesn't quite look like himself, and at the same time does very much, and it's disarming. I didn't buy it entirely in the first scene... and then the scenes kept coming, and Brando, playing Zapata as stubborn and headstrong and without much in way of a sense of humor as a leader as a General (and rightfully so as revolutionary figures tend to be, see Che for more details), is spot on. It's worthy of the rest of his oeuvre at the time, if not quite up to the monolithic status of Streetcar and Waterfront then at least as good if not better than the underrated The Wild One. This is vintage Brando every step of the way, absorbing us in this figure who reminds us all why it's necessary to have such heroes - but also the lacerating side of the double-edged sword where-in those in power will do all they can to destroy the hero. That and, well, revolutions and movements of ideas amongst people end up turning things pretty damn bittersweet; just look at the very end for that, as four peasants talk of Zapata's status as an idea as well as a man.

Viva Zapata! presents Mexico in some fresh and amazing cinematography, sturdy and sometimes clever and heartfelt direction from Elia Kazan, always best with his actors (even Anthony Quinn who again proves why he was best as taking on an ethnicity and making it believable, if only up to a point as his powerhouse turn shows here), and some very interesting writing from John Steinbeck. The script sometimes takes its turns and movements that don't make it quite flow as well as it would in a book; individual scenes are knock-outs, mini-masterpieces of words exchanged with underlying meaning or trying to find the meaning in how people can persevere, or not as it turns out (one such scene I loved is when Zapata has been installed as the President- as Pancho Villa says there's "no one else"), and the farmers he says he knows comes and demands the same things he did once before, but at a personal price.

There's lots of great things like that, or just the uncomfortable but true rapore between Zapata and his future-wife's family when they talk in metaphors. If only Steinbeck didn't sometimes jerk the story ahead without some warning (it will be hard to explain, you just have to see it to understand, though this may have more to do with the direction than writing, more research is needed for this assumption) it would be unstoppable as a classic. As it stands though Viva Zapata! is an essential chronicle of a rebel with a cause, an honest man of principles who tried to do too much good in a country where it just wasn't possible. Or, perhaps, things like this just aren't possible; one can see the parallels and maybe even find this to be like a condensed version of Soderbergh's Che in taking a sobering look at the sweet highs and sobering lows of rising up against the powers that be (and yes, this is quite the leftist movie, all the more odd considering it's John McCain's favorite film!)

Was the above review useful to you?
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Henry Silva? tornhill-1
Quinn..oscar?! Jase412
Mexican Revolution accuracies/inaccuraci es (spoiler alert) justonerobot
What is the reason why this is not available in US DVD format? rjsl
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Mexican song help Truman_Galapagos
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