Singin' in the Rain
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 68 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


Why it's the theatre that's given us a Ladykillers to die for

22 December 2011 3:57 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Graham Linehan's stage adaptation of The Ladykillers succeeds where the Coen brothers failed: it's actually funny

Graham Linehan's new stage adaptation of the classic 1955 Ealing movie The Ladykillers, directed by Sean Foley, is up and running in London's West End. My colleague Michael Billington has delivered his verdict and I went to see it the other day. The questions this production throws up – apart from "Wasn't that brilliant?" and "When for goodness' sake can I see it again?" – are "How has Mr Linehan bucked the trend of film-to-play adaptations being so cynical and awful?" and "How has he succeeded where the Coen brothers failed?"

Joel and Ethan Coen produced their own remake of The Ladykillers in 2004. The original had a wacky criminal gang, led by Alec Guinness's loopy professor, renting a room in a tumbledown old house in London's King's Cross from a sweet old lady, whom »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Glasgow dances with the stars

16 December 2011 10:00 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Gene Kelly retrospective to feature at 2012 festival. Youth Festival details also announced.

"Gene Kelly led a one-man revolution in Hollywood that changed the screen musical forever," says Glasgow Film Festival director Allan Hunter, explaining why the fleet-fotted star of Singin' In The Rain will be the subject of a special retrospective at next February's event. Stars like Judy Garland, Cyd Charisse and Frank Sinatra will also feature in what is set to be a treat for dance fans. If you want to give it a go yourself, there'll even be a special Gene Kelly ceilidh!

The »

- Jennie Kermode

Permalink | Report a problem


Here's looking at you, kid: how classic films are winning new fans

14 December 2011 7:55 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Buster Keaton, Bugsy Malone and the Wizard of Oz are captivating children at film clubs across the UK

Black and white images flicker across absorbed young faces as timeless stories unfold. To the delight of the education charity Filmclub, classic films are captivating children as young as seven.

In the past year, a quarter of all the films watched by its members have been pre-1979 movies and some, such as The Electric Edwardians (1900), date right back to the birth of cinema.

Launched in 2008 by film director Beeban Kidron and educationist Lindsay Mackie, Filmclub (@filmclub) helps schools set up film clubs and supplies a huge range of thoughtfully curated films.

Libby Serdiuk, aged 10, was "pleasantly surprised by The General (1926):

"I had never watched a film without sound or colour. Before I knew it my eyes were glued to the screen! The stunts were exhilarating to watch, Buster Keaton was mind blowing, »

- Judy Friedberg

Permalink | Report a problem


This week's new film events

9 December 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Teuvo Tulio's Lost Masterpieces, London

What? You've never heard of Teuvo Tulio? Where have you been? Clearly not in mid-century Finland, or you'd know all about this unsung, unorthodox auteur. A former silent screen idol, Tulio fashioned an unabashedly melodramatic style behind the camera (his heroes were Cukor, Lubitsch and Von Sternberg), oblivious to his own lack of budget or professionalism. His movies typically mix fallen women, country charmers, ripe rural imagery and social commentary, as shown in the four restored movies here, made between 1938 and 1946, with the series opening with In The Field Of Dreams. His influence can be detected in the works of Fassbinder, Guy Maddin and Aki Kaurismäki, some of whose films play alongside Tulio's here, plus Cukor's The Women.

Ica, SW1, Fri to 23 Dec

Dreams Of A Life Q&As, London

It's no understatement to describe Carol Morley's forthcoming documentary as one of the »

- Steve Rose

Permalink | Report a problem


MGM musicals: more stars than the heavens

9 December 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Watching the best of the studio's output – Singin' in the Rain, Meet Me in St Louis – is to indulge in pure joyous artifice

Fred Astaire strolls into a toyshop with a walking stick and spats, whistling. He snatches an oversized Easter bunny from a small boy and proceeds to do a tap dance using a series of conveniently positioned props that happen to be lying around on the shop floor. "I'm plumb crazy for drums," he sings, for no obvious reason. Then he takes his bunny – without paying – and nonchalantly strolls out again.

This – a scene from Easter Parade (1948) – is the sort of thing that could only happen in the fantastical Technicolor world of the MGM musical. Such trifles as logical plot development and plausible human motivation have no place here. What matters is getting as quickly as possible to the next song and the next dance and letting the stars do their thing. »

- Bee Wilson

Permalink | Report a problem


The best shows of 2011: Michael Billington's choice

4 December 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With British theatre looking backwards, even the one new play that almost everyone enjoyed was a skilful reworking of an 18th-century classic

The British theatre is living off its past. Just think of the plays that left a strong impression in 2011: Caryl Churchill's Top Girls (1982), Harold Pinter's Betrayal (1978), Edward Bond's Saved (1965), Arnold Wesker's The Kitchen (1959) and his Chicken Soup With Barley (1958), and Terence Rattigan's Flare Path (1942). Even the one new play that almost everyone enjoyed, Richard Bean's One Man, Two Guvnors, was a skilful reworking of an 18th-century classic.

I admired Mike Bartlett's 13 at the National and Alan Ayckbourn's Neighbourhood Watch in Scarborough for their ability, in very different ways, to reflect the tenor of the times. Two other old hands, David Hare with South Downs and David Edgar with Written on the Heart, turned in highly accomplished pieces. But, even »

- Michael Billington

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily Briefing. Godard, Cavalier and More

4 December 2011 10:48 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"One of the major works of Jean-Luc Godard, the eight-part essay film Histoire(s) du Cinéma has revealed itself slowly over a period of more than 30 years, as a sort of intellectual striptease." In the New York Times, Dave Kehr traces the histories of the making, reception and distribution of Histoire(s), which sees a release this week on two discs from Olive Films. For Kehr, Histoire(s) "is a sort of associational machine, as dense and obscure as any of the Symbolist poetry that also serves as one of Mr Godard's reference points, but one that also solicits the viewer's participation in connecting the dots and filling in the blanks." The work is also "a tragic account of the 20th century: a century of staggering atrocities, which the aesthetic glories of the motion picture medium (or any other art form) were unable to prevent, and may, in Mr Godard's view, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Michel Hazanavicius's "The Artist"

25 November 2011 12:59 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"Of all the cinematic surprises of 2011 — the ascendency of Elizabeth Olsen, the excellence of Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Woody Allen's return as hit-maker — the renaissance of silent cinema was probably the hardest to see coming down the pike," writes Tom Shone in Slate. "After it received a 15-minute standing ovation, Michel Hazanavicius's homage to the days of swashbuckling matinee idols, iris shots, and Busby Berkeley dance numbers, The Artist, was marked up by Oscarologists as the outside favorite to win best picture." And of course, this same holiday weekend has seen the opening of Martin Scorsese's Hugo, "whose poster echoes Harold Lloyd's clock shenanigans in Safety Last (1923) and whose final 25 minutes turn into a loving revivification of the earliest days of cinema, from George Méliès's A Trip to the Moon to the Lumière brothers' Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat… Nobody could accuse modern blockbusters of silence, »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Muppets and moi

23 November 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Kermit, Miss Piggy and pals are back with a new film and a TV series in the works. Hadley Freeman fondly remembers the satirical puppets and the massive role they played in her childhood

Some of us, for the record, have always played the music. And some of us, also just to clarify, never stopped lighting the lights. That's because, for us in the cultural elite, we are always ready to meet the Muppets on The Muppet Show tonight.

When it was announced on Tuesday that Us TV broadcaster NBC has commissioned a script for a new series of the Muppets, the reaction among critics, commentators and tweeters was, frankly, remarkable. It is rare that a four-decades old franchise can announce a return to TV and prompt such unabashed enthusiasm as well as a total lack of cynicism about quality control. Everyone loves the Muppets – that goes without saying. More »

- Hadley Freeman

Permalink | Report a problem


The Muppets and moi

23 November 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Kermit, Miss Piggy and pals are back with a new film and a TV series in the works. Hadley Freeman fondly remembers the satirical puppets and the massive role they played in her childhood

Some of us, for the record, have always played the music. And some of us, also just to clarify, never stopped lighting the lights. That's because, for us in the cultural elite, we are always ready to meet the Muppets on The Muppet Show tonight.

When it was announced on Tuesday that Us TV broadcaster NBC has commissioned a script for a new series of the Muppets, the reaction among critics, commentators and tweeters was, frankly, remarkable. It is rare that a four-decades old franchise can announce a return to TV and prompt such unabashed enthusiasm as well as a total lack of cynicism about quality control. Everyone loves the Muppets – that goes without saying. More »

- Hadley Freeman

Permalink | Report a problem


Do Movies About Movies Win Oscars?

23 November 2011 7:54 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) has had it with the movies in "The Artist"Over at Fandor's Keyframe blog I'll be musing about the Oscar race on a biweekly basis. This week's topic is the unusual abundance of movies about movies in this year's Oscar race from Marilyn Monroe (My Week With Marilyn) to George Melies (Hugo) to Hollywood's seismic sound shift in the late 20s (The Artist). But one thing I didn't dwell on too much in the article (which I hope you'll go and read!) is the lack of Oscars won for movies about movies.

Everyone predicting a win for The Artist (2011) before the nominations are even announced should consider the following list and sobering fact: No movie about movies has ever won Best Picture.

Movies About Movies: How Do They Do With Oscar?

(Best Picture Nominees are in red) 

Janet Gaynor (already an Oscar winner) was nominated again »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Dancing With the Stars’ Finale: Live Blogging the Show

22 November 2011 6:02 PM, PST | Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal | See recent Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal news »

ABC

Live, from four living rooms in the greater New York City area, it’s Speakeasy’s “Dancing with the Stars” live blog!

After 10 weeks of shimmying and bellyaching, we’re at the final episode of Season 13. It’s a long reunion, in which we pay homage to people gone too soon, people gone too late, people barely remembered and the final three couples. There’s actual, score- and placement-affecting dancing to do tonight. Each finalist will do his or her favorite dance. »

- Barbara Chai

Permalink | Report a problem


"The Artist," reviewed

22 November 2011 7:29 AM, PST | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

In the classic film "Singin' in the Rain," directors Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly examined Hollywood's transition from silent to sound cinema from the perspective of the winners; actors like Kelly's Don Lockwood, who successfully survived the advent of the talkies. In the new romantic drama "The Artist," director Michel Hazanavicius reimagines that same journey from the perspective of the losers, men like Jean Dujardin's George Valentin, who were left behind when Al Jolson belted out his first onscreen tune in "The Jazz Singer." While "Singin' in the Rain" used the formal language of the musical to celebrate everything that the movies gained with sound, "The Artist" cleverly uses the language of silent cinema to remind us of what the movies lost, namely the magic of pure visual storytelling.

Dujardin is the film's impossibly handsome and charismatic star, a Douglas Fairbanks-esque matinee idol. As "The Artist" begins, he's »

- Matt Singer

Permalink | Report a problem


Why silent movies are golden once more

20 November 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Artist, a black-and-white beauty, could cash in on Hollywood's nostalgia for the early 20th century with an Oscar

A silent film hasn't won the Oscar for best picture since Wings took the top prize at the very first ceremony in 1929. A year later, the talkies had taken hold, and it's fair to say they have dominated the awards ever since. But now, for the first time in more than 80 years, a silent movie is being talked up as a real Oscars contender.

The Artist is a French film, but set in Hollywood at the end of the silent era, and shot like one of the very best films from that time. That means it's black-and-white, it uses the squarer "Academy Ratio" frame rather than widescreen and, yes, it's silent. It's a beguiling, A Star is Born/Singin' in the Rain story of two lovers whose paths and careers cross »

- Pamela Hutchinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Cine-files: Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford

15 November 2011 8:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Small, homely and with excellent homemade brownies, Oxford's first purpose-built picturehouse was 100 years old this year

• Check out our Google map and flickr group

• Tell us where to go next

On location: Tucked away in an east Oxford side street, the Grade II-listed Ultimate Picture Palace sits in the arty quarter – an area more town than gown, despite its proximity to Oxford Brookes. While Oxford's other arthouse cinema, the Phoenix, is situated deep in pricey hipster neighbourhood Jericho, the Cowley Road area is a vibrant hodgepodge of exotic food shops, restaurants, takeaways, pubs, music venues and independent retailers. The Upp looks more like a rundown amusement arcade from outside, while the inside has an inexplicably Blitzy feel.

Crowd scene: Mostly 20- and 30-somethings, many of them students. The Upp crowd tends not to chat or rustle, is happy to wait a few weeks to see the latest releases and appreciates »

- Anne Wollenberg

Permalink | Report a problem


MGM musicals: All singing, all dancing

10 November 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

MGM meant musicals for more than a decade after the second world war. David Thomson looks at a time when a little cheer at the movies was appreciated – and wonders if the same couldn't be said now

There had been musicals before. In the 1930s, as soon as sound permitted, Warner Brothers developed what we call the Busby Berkeley pictures: they were black and white, and often aware of the harsh Depression times, but a choreographic lather of girls and fluid, orgasmic forms where the camera was itching to plunge into the centre of the "big O" – think of Footlight Parade, Gold Diggers of 1933 or 42nd Street. They had aerial shots of waves and whirlpools of chorus girls, opening and closing their legs in time with our desire. A few years later, at Rko Pictures, the Astaire-Rogers films came into being – where the gravity, beauty, and exhilaration of the »

- David Thomson

Permalink | Report a problem


"The Artist" and the new Herzog

3 November 2011 8:23 AM, PDT | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

• Toronto Entry #2

I have not quite become jaded. Sometimes I fear that I am so familiar with movie formulas that some films don't have a fair chance. Then I go to see Michel Hazanavicius' "The Artist" and it tells a story that would have been familiar in the late 1920s, when it is set, and I begin by admiring its technique and am surprised to find, half way through, that I actually care how it turns out.

This was the surprise hit of Cannes 2011, the winner of the Best Actor award for Jean Dujardin. It is a silent film--nearly. It is a black and white, and in the classic screen ratio of 1:1.33, and has music, as all silent films did in one way or another. It is a loose retelling of "Singin' in the Rain," another film about a silent star failing to make the transition to talkies. »

- Roger Ebert

Permalink | Report a problem


My Favorite Movie: David Boreanaz

3 November 2011 2:00 AM, PDT | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

"If I had to pick one, 'Singin' in the Rain' is probably one of the best films ever made. Donald O'Connor's performance in that is just, I love him. I think he was great….

Even 'The Wizard of Oz,' I'm a sucker for...  'The Shining.' 'Goodfellas.' I mean, I love anything Martin Scorsese did… 'Everybody's Fine' [with] Marcello Mastroianni… Short films [like] 'La Jetée,' great film, experimental.

Former film student David Borneanaz can currently be seen as FBI ref Ed Rush in "The Mighty Macs" with Carla Gugino. »

- Jenni Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


BFI London Film Festival 2011: 'The Artist'

18 October 2011 5:38 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ A categorical success at this year's Cannes Film Festival, Michel Hazanavicius' The Artist is a gloriously executed love letter to the silent era of Hollywood, featuring an award-winning performance by Jean Dujardin (Best Actor at Cannes). A thoroughly enjoyable romp, The Artist looks set to be a crowd favourite at this year's BFI London Film Festival and a major contender for the Best Picture Oscar at next year's Academy Awards.

Whilst an undeniable homage to the glitz and glamour of 1920s and 30s cinema, The Artist is more than just a nostalgic trip down memory lane. We follow George Valentin (Dujardin), a silent movie megastar whose fame has become threatened by the advent of the 'talkies'. At first he dismisses this cinematic evolution as little more than a fad, thrusting himself into his own pet project – a directorial debut called 'Tears of Love', a romantic adventure set within the jungles of Africa. »

- Daniel Green

Permalink | Report a problem


Nyff 2011. Michel Hazanavicius's "The Artist"

17 October 2011 11:55 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

A little over a week ago, Geoffrey Macnab prepped Independent readers for the arrival of Michel Hazanavicius's latest at the London Film Festival: "Rapturously received in Cannes, this is a classic tale of old Hollywood: an A Star is Born-style yarn about a slick movie star, George Valentin (Jean Dujardin), whose popularity begins to wane with the arrival of the talkies in the late 1920s, just as that of the Theda Bara-like It Girl Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo) rises. The Artist is a film of extraordinary visual zest, humor and pathos. It also happens to be French-made, black and white... and silent…. Valentin, the debonair and dashing protagonist of The Artist, is clearly modelled on Douglas Fairbanks. The irony of this is that Kevin Brownlow is currently trying to make a documentary about Fairbanks through his company Photoplay Productions, and no one will finance it. Contacted this week, »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 68 items from 2011   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners