Singin' in the Rain
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »

9 Terrifying Home Invasion Movies You'll Never Forget

10 September 2015 10:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

"A Clockwork Orange" (1971)"A Clockwork Orange" is handful of different genres all warped up into one, and perhaps its most terrifying element is the way in which it toys with home invasion evil. In the infamously prolonged sequence from Kubrick's masterpiece, the director manages to completely dismantle one of the most memorable musical sequences in cinematic history, which is no easy feat. Sung by Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) as he beats and rapes a middle-aged husband and wife with his droogs in hand, "Singin' in the Rain" is injected with unshakable horror. The song is terrifying all the more for the way in which Alex so effortlessly harnesses the gleeful memories of Gene Kelly's dance steps to carry out his own barbaric actions and quench his thirst for ultra-violence.  "The Cable Guy" (1996)Most home invasion movies find themselves operating in the horror and/or thriller genres, but leave it »

- Indiewire

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"Eye of the Tiger" Played at Kim Davis' Release Rally, Internet Officially Declares Classic Song Ruined for Life

8 September 2015 2:16 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Remember the first time you saw A Clockwork Orange? And after that disturbing scene you knew you'd never be able to hear "Singin' in the Rain" the same way again and that song was ruined for life?  Well, you'd better prepare to mourn "Eye of the Tiger," because the Internet has officially declared that tune dead. Why? Because it was the song played while anti-gay clerk Kim Davis walked out of a jail to a crowd of cheering supporters. Mike Huckabee was there to escort a proud Davis onstage, and she raised her arms in victory as if she just ran the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art instead of what she actually did: refused to do her job of granting couples the basic human right of »

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Iconic director Spike Lee, Hollywood legends Debbie Reynolds and Gena Rowlands are getting Honorary Oscars

27 August 2015 12:50 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Do the Right Thing director Spike Lee and Hollywood screen legends Debbie Reynolds and Gena Rowlands are finally receiving Oscars.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will pay tribute to these three influential cinema icons by giving them Academy Honorary Awards later this year.

A ceremony will be held in their honour at Hollywood's Grand Ballroom as part of the seventh annual Governors Awards on November 14.

Filmmaker Lee has received two Oscar nominations in the past, for Best Original Screenplay in 1990 for Do the Right Thing and Best Documentary in 1998 for 4 Little Girls.

Lee made a name for himself with gripping stories of African-American life early in his career in She's Gotta Have It and Jungle Fever, among other hits.

In more recent years, he also turned his lens to the horror genre with Oldboy and big-budget thriller Inside Man.

Reynolds became one of the enduring stars of »

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A Unique Superstar: 20th Century Icon Garbo on TCM

26 August 2015 5:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Greta Garbo movie 'The Kiss.' Greta Garbo movies on TCM Greta Garbo, a rarity among silent era movie stars, is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” performer today, Aug. 26, '15. Now, why would Garbo be considered a silent era rarity? Well, certainly not because she easily made the transition to sound, remaining a major star for another decade. Think Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, William Powell, Fay Wray, Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, John Barrymore, Warner Baxter, Janet Gaynor, Constance Bennett, etc. And so much for all the stories about actors with foreign accents being unable to maintain their Hollywood stardom following the advent of sound motion pictures. A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer star, Garbo was no major exception to the supposed rule. Mexican Ramon Novarro, another MGM star, also made an easy transition to sound, and so did fellow Mexicans Lupe Velez and Dolores del Rio, in addition to the very British »

- Andre Soares

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More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

23 August 2015 5:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination. »

- Andre Soares

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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Three's Not a Crowd: Film's 5 best on-screen trios

8 July 2015 10:03 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

This weekend, three itty-bitty evil henchmen get a prequel of their very own in Minions. The third Despicable Memovie follows everyone's favourite goggle-wearing, overall-clad minions – Stuart, Kevin, and Bob – as they travel across continents, unsuccessfully aiding potential masters such as Napoleon, a T. Rex, and Sandra Bullock, amongst others, before finding Gru (Steve Carell).

Just in time for Stuart, Kevin, and Bob's return to theatres, we compiled a list of cinema's best on-screen trios B.G. "Before Gru" – so sadly, the Minions are absent here, though you can visit them at Cineplex theatres starting this weekend!

The very many honourable mentions include Legolas, Gimli, and Aragorn of the original Lord of the Rings trilogy; Vizzini, Fezzik, and Inigo Montoya from The Princess Bride; Alexandra, Jane, and Sukie from The Witches of Eastwick; Henry, Jimmy, and Tommy from Goodfellas; Don, Cathy, and Cosmo from Singin' in the Rain; The Dude, Walter, »

- Sasha James

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Male Stripper to Movie Star: The Evolution of Channing Tatum

1 July 2015 8:33 AM, PDT | | See recent Rolling Stone news »

"I didn't want to move or act like a rich man. I wanted to dance in a pair of jeans. I wanted to dance like the man in the streets." – Gene Kelly

It's hard to imagine — let alone remember — living in a world where it wasn't a universally acknowledged truth that Channing Tatum used to be a stripper. Today, that particular chapter of his origin story seems as inextricable from the 35-year-old actor's story as Ginger Rogers is from Fred Astaire's career, or Scientology is from that of Tom Cruise, »

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Britain's Got Talent semi-final 2: The live show as it happened

26 May 2015 11:15 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

This year's Britain's Got Talent semi-finals kicked off last night with the usual bonkers antics, from Simon Cowell calling Amanda Holden a witch to a dog breaking a world record.

Tonight (May 26), the second semi-final is bound to have some water-cooler moments, including the wonderdog Matisse, Old Men Grooving and returning stars Jack Pack. So join us from 7.30pm to go through the madness together...

21:59So what do you make of that then? Happy or angry with the results? Let us know in all the usual ways. We'll be back tomorrow night with more live-blogging of semi-final number three, so see you then!


I cannot believe Revelation Avenue didn't get through.

— Jamie Lambert (@JamieCollabro) May 26, 2015

21:57There you go! It is Old Men Grooving who go through to the final. Revelation Avenue look incredibly downhearted, and maybe they should be. Travesty? Shock? Or was it the right decision? »

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Britain's Got Talent semi-final 2: The live shows continue - live blog

26 May 2015 11:15 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

This year's Britain's Got Talent semi-finals kicked off last night with the usual bonkers antics, from Simon Cowell calling Amanda Holden a witch to a dog breaking a world record.

Tonight (May 26), the second semi-final is bound to have some water-cooler moments, including the wonderdog Matisse, Old Men Grooving and returning stars Jack Pack. So join us from 7.30pm to go through the madness together...

20:58We're going to take a much-needed cup of tea break now, so join us again at 9.30 to see who goes through to the final.

20:55My prediction: The final 3 will be Old Men Grooving, Revelation Avenue and Jules O'Dwyer & Matisse, with Omg going home. What do you think?

20:53Well the Old Men get the biggest cheers of the night, could they cause an upset? They're no Stavros Flatley!

20:51Essentially just watching a group of random dads on a Saturday night out after too many pints of ale. »

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Sing A Song: 5 Best Movie Music Moments from This Decade

15 May 2015 2:30 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

With all the aca-anticipation for Pitch Perfect 2 finally cresting with its wide release today, it's interesting to note the shift in popular cinema away from the big, challenging singing-and-dancing set-pieces that Stanley Donen and Vincente Minelli, amongst a slew of others in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, mastered in their salad days. These days, big musicals like Dreamgirls and Into the Woods are filmed more like tinny Oscar bait, all forced visual maturity with no antic, anxious energy in the filmmaking to match the loamy variety of vocals and unbound dance moves, though, frankly, The Raid 2 offers a more elegant and astonishing study of body movement than most major musicals of the last decade. To find the true offspring of Singin' in the Rain and The Band Wagon, one must search in the independent-movie corridors for what's been called "music movies," where love of music, dancing, musicianship, and technical know-how are swirled together. »

- Chris Cabin

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The 10 Best Movies About Movies

7 May 2015 1:13 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Movies about movies are catnip for critics, turning the camera back on not only the faces behind it but also on us. Why do we love movies? What drives the perverse pleasure of watching them? Films like Michael Powell's 1960 "Peeping Tom" and David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive" attack the latter question most directly.  So as Fellini's "8 1/2," the towering giant of the genre, returns to UK cinemas, Jonathan Romney posts a list of The 10 Best Films About Films in The Guardian. To name ten such films is a tall order for any meta-movie completist, but Romney's inventory leaves room for debate. His picks: "Behind the Screen" (Charlie Chaplin, 1916)"The Player" (Robert Altman, 1992)"Peeping Tom" (Michael Powell, 1960)"8 1/2" (Federico Fellini, 1963)"Contempt" (Jean-Luc Godard, 1963)"Singin' in the Rain" (Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen, 1952)"Wes Craven's New »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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'Dancing With the Stars' Recap: America Chooses Well (So Far)

5 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Oh, dance fans, I had a hard time watching this episode of "Dancing with the Stars." Don't get me wrong, there's actually a lot of great dancing here for America's Choice and a trio round. The problem is, every couple to perform reminds me of last week's travesty: the heart-breaking elimination that sent home our beloved Willow. She should still be here, and it's disgusting to me that she's not. It's particularly hard to be objective about Chris and Robert when I'm still so angry over Willow's ouster.

But there's still lots to admire in this exciting "race to the semi-finals" episode, filled with chills, spills, high pressure, and even two birthdays. Yes, Erin is presented with a cake for her birthday, which she doesn't eat herself (women almost never eat on television) but shares with Tom for his 60th birthday on Wednesday. It's also America's Choice, as the fans »

- Renée Camus

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Making magic by Anne-Katrin Titze

8 April 2015 12:37 PM, PDT | | See recent news »

CinéSalon Haute Couture on Film opening night - Stanley Donen's Funny Face starring Audrey Hepburn in Givenchy, Fred Astaire and Kay Thompson.

Delphine [Selles-Alvarez] has chosen the perfect movie to open the Haute Couture on Film series. Stanley Donen, who previously co-directed On The Town and Singin' In The Rain, both with Gene Kelly, is a specialist in connecting painted picture book backgrounds, still objects, colours, patterns, studio sets or actual city streets and making them come alive more vividly than any realism could accomplish. The power of fashion as moving art is a part of it. You remember what people are wearing in a Donen film.

Embryo Concepts - Marion (Dovima) with Jo Stockton (Audrey Hepburn) as "atmosphere"

Hubert de Givenchy had been contacted by a Miss Hepburn to make a wardrobe for Billy Wilder's Sabrina (1954) and had initially thought the Miss Hepburn in question was Katharine, not Audrey. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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13 Reasons Why Elizabeth Taylor Is Still the Queen of Hollywood

27 February 2015 1:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's time to raise your glass and rattle your jewelry for a birthday toast to Elizabeth Taylor, who'd have turned 83 on Feb. 27. Though memories of her begin to fade, the legacy of the woman who was perhaps the most beautiful, most popular, most everything movie star of all time remains as vivid as ever.

Younger moviegoers may wonder what all the fuss was about. Here, then, are 13 reasons why Taylor remains, decades after her prime and four years after her death, the queen of Hollywood.

1. In a way, she never left.

Even though she died in 2011, they're still showing her in commercials for her perfume, White Diamonds.

2. She's the original diva.

Long before Beyonce, the Kardashians, Jennifer Lopez, and other current divas, Taylor pretty much invented the concept that a celebrity's offscreen life was just as much a performance as onscreen, and just as much part of the job description. »

- Gary Susman

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Neil Patrick Harris Opens 2015 Oscars with Anna Kendrick, Oprah Jokes and Stormtroopers!

22 February 2015 5:50 PM, PST | | See recent news »

Neil Patrick Harris opened the 87th annual Academy Awards with a monologue and song-and-dance number filled with star power, insider humor and even a dig at the Academy itself. "Tonight we honor Hollywood's best and whitest - sorry, brightest," joked Harris, 41, clearly not pulling any punches from the start. As is only natural for the man who's hosted the Tonys and the Emmys, Harris then launched into an opening tune that was a true movie lover's tribute to movies - "how they can move you and improve you" - that referenced everything from Singin' in the Rain to Star Wars, »

- Lanford Beard, @lanfordbeard

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"Singin' In The Rain" Screening With Live Accompaniment By New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, State Theatre, New Brunswick, Sunday February 8

7 February 2015 9:15 AM, PST | | See recent CinemaRetro news »


The State Theatre in New Brunswick, New Jersey presents a big screen showing of the greatest movie musical of all time, "Singin' in the Rain" with live accompaniment by the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Constantine Kitsopoulus. The show time is 3:00 Pm but get there at 2:00 for pre-show festivities including sing-a-longs of great movie songs. Click here for ticket info.   »

- (Cinema Retro)

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SAG Awards: Debbie Reynolds honoured for lifetime achievement

26 January 2015 7:12 AM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Debbie Reynolds accepted the Screen Actors Guild's lifetime achievement award from her daughter Sunday night, and promptly embarrassed Carrie Fisher with a story.

The 82-year-old entertainer recalled having "a big, ugly bun" in her best-known movie, Singin' in the Rain.

"I warned my daughter Carrie, be careful of any weird hairdo," Reynolds said she advised Fisher before playing Princess Leia in George LucasStar Wars.

"Luckily, George gave her two buns."

Reynolds initially told the audience at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles that her favourite movie was Singin' in the Rain, her first major co-starring role in 1952 with Gene Kelly.

But later she also called The Unsinkable Molly Brown her favourite. She received her only Oscar nomination for the 1964 film.

"I got to sing a song called 'I Ain't Down Yet,'" she said. "Well, I ain't."

The acerbic Fisher lovingly and bitingly celebrated her mother before turning over the mic. »

- and contributors

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

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