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Red Ball Express (1952)

 -  Drama | War  -  29 August 1952 (Finland)
6.3
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Ratings: 6.3/10 from 298 users  
Reviews: 9 user | 2 critic

Story of the military truck drivers who kept the Allied armies supplied in Europe during WW2.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (story), 1 more credit »
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Title: Red Ball Express (1952)

Red Ball Express (1952) on IMDb 6.3/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Alex Nicol ...
Sgt. Red Kallek
Charles Drake ...
Pvt. Ronald Partridge / Narrator
Judith Braun ...
Joyce McClellan
...
Robertson
Jacqueline Duval ...
Antoinette Dubois
Bubber Johnson ...
Pvt. Taffy Smith
Davis Roberts ...
Pvt. Dave McCord (as Robert Davis)
...
Pvt. Wilson
Frank Chase ...
Pvt. Higgins
Cindy Garner ...
Kitty Walsh
Gregg Palmer ...
Tank Lieutenant (as Palmer Lee)
John Hudson ...
Tank Sergeant
...
Heyman
Howard Petrie ...
Maj. Gen. Lee Gordon
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Storyline

August 1944: proceeding with the invasion of France, Patton's Third Army has advanced so far toward Paris that it cannot be supplied. To keep up the momentum, Allied HQ establishes an elite military truck route. One (racially integrated) platoon of this Red Ball Express encounters private enmities, bypassed enemy pockets, minefields, and increasingly perilous missions, leavened by a touch of comedy. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

FROM BEACHHEAD TO BATTLEFRONT! THEY CARRY THE AMMO FOR PATTON'S TANKS! (original print ad - all caps)

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

29 August 1952 (Finland)  »

Also Known As:

Red Ball Express  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

James Edwards was originally cast in the role of Robertson but was fired during production when he refused to testify before HUAC. He was replaced by Sidney Poitier. See more »

Crazy Credits

No credits besides the title, seven minutes in the film. See more »

Connections

Featured in Budd Boetticher: A Man Can Do That (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
workmanlike war
24 November 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is obviously a war film that will never be dated. Even after 60 years, it is fresh and relevant, because it tells about life the way it was in World War II, as experienced by people of the era, in a way that is credible.

We get a good mix of the "workmanship" of war, combined with "down time" and "deadly time". Chandler plays the officer who realizes how dangerous it is to be "lax", as one might be when 98% of your duty is simply workmanship, like driving, loading, and unloading supply trucks. It is the "unforeseeen" incident that gets you. It is being unready. It is the fluke or freak occurrence that will be deadly.

We have a star studded cast here, fairly common for old war films, but impossible for the twenty-first century, simply because of the dilution of movie making. Not that "dilution" is bad, but it's simply the fact that if everyone and his cousin is making a movie, then there are millions of actors, and thus no way for more than a few dozen to ever gain the sort of fame that hundreds of actors used to have.

The integration was splendid in this film, and believable. The white and black troopers behaved and spoke in a way that made you think they were from the mid twentieth century.

This is hard to do today. It is done today, but it is hard to sell that concept today. However, one must remember one thing in making World War II movies. If one makes it for the lingo of the era, as this film does, then it always remains true and credible. If one makes it for the lingo of 1990 or 2000, it will get a huge following for that generation, but in 80 years, it will be scoffed at by later generations, while films like "Red Ball Express" continue to stick around.

The acting is great, and the characters are great. Each character brings his own story to the screen, so we have many subplots. There are 3 major ones, each involving the major stars.

The subplots are handled well, and while the one with Chandler and Nicol is over the top, it is dramatic and theatrical, and well handled.

Chandler was the big star at the time. O'Brien is a minor mainstay, somehow always remaining a recognizable individual that is rare for leading man types. Poitier is a legend, with "Lillies", "Heat", "Dinner", and "Bedford" insuring his status. Drake will always remain a mainstay as a player of lovable rogues. This may be his best role, as he pretty much steals the show. Alex Nicol is the wild card. Films like this, "Then There Were Three", and "The Man From Laramie" will go back and forth to and from classic status, and he will be a huge name in classic film a hundred years from now. He probably never realized this while he was making "B" budget movies.


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