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Oklahoma Annie (1952)

Approved | | Comedy, Western | 24 March 1952 (USA)
A storekeeper gets involved in cleaning up corruption in her town, and also hopes to attract the attention of the handsome new sheriff.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Judy Canova
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Dan Fraser
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Bull McCready
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Curt Walker
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Paydirt (as Emmett 'Pappy' Lynn)
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Eldridge Haskell
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Mrs. Lottie Fling
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Blinky
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Mrs. Carrie Fudge
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Lou (Coffin Creek Cafe bartender)
Maxine Gates ...
Tillie
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Judge Byrnes
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Skip
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Jim Tullett
Andrew Tombes ...
Mayor of Eureka
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Storyline

A storekeeper gets involved in cleaning up corruption in her town, and also hopes to attract the attention of the handsome new sheriff.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

QUEEN OF THE COWGIRLS (original poster-all caps)

Genres:

Comedy | Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 March 1952 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La sceriffa dell'Oklahoma  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| (RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Trucolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Oh Dear What Can the Matter Be?
(uncredited)
Traditional
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User Reviews

 
Unwatchable today
24 September 2007 | by (Connecticut) – See all my reviews

In OKLAHOMA ANNIE, familiar Hollywood country bumpkin Judy Canova (she of the buck teeth, pigtails and off-key singing voice) runs a general store, falls in love with the new sheriff and helps clean up corruption in her little community. Truth is, nothing much actually happens although there's an awful lot of running around. Veteran villain Roy Barcroft is the chief bad guy, and familiar Western actor John Russell plays the new sheriff. Oh, and grizzled character actor Fuzzy Knight plays one of Judy's cornpone buddies. But the focus in ANNIE is almost solely on Judy, for better or worse. Made in 1952, ANNIE (where did they get that title?) plays more like a TV show than a theatrical release. Shot in splashy color and mixing cars in with horses, this sort-of Western is a holdover from another era. Hillbillies have never gone out of style in Hollywood, admittedly, but this particular hillbilly grates on the nerves pretty quickly. I enjoy Ms. Canova in small doses. Very small doses. For the curious and historically-minded only.


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