4.8/10
32
2 user 1 critic

My Wife's Lodger (1952)

A soldier comes home from the war expecting a warm welcome, but he finds that his wife had taken in a lodger during his absence, and now she and his somewhat dingy daughter seem to be paying much more attention to the lodger than to him.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (play)
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dominic Roche ...
Willie Higginbotham
Olive Sloane ...
Maggie Higginbotham
Leslie Dwyer ...
Roger the Lodger
...
Eunice Higginbotham
Alan Sedgwick ...
Tex
Vincent Dowling ...
Norman Higginbotham
...
Mother-in-Law
...
Policeman
David Hannaford ...
Vernon
Ilena Sylva ...
Vernon's Mother
...
Doctor
Wally Patch ...
Sergeant
Derek Tansley ...
Deserter
...
Lance Corporal (as Alistair Hunter)
Toke Townley ...
Soldier
Edit

Storyline

A soldier comes home from the war expecting a warm welcome, but he finds that his wife had taken in a lodger during his absence, and now she and his somewhat dingy daughter seem to be paying much more attention to the lodger than to him.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on play | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

October 1952 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Dominic Roche had also starred in the stage production of his play in London's West End in 1950. See more »

Connections

Featured in Talkies: Memories of Diana Dors (2017) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Dis-spriting British comedy.
7 December 2002 | by See all my reviews

Maurice Elvey objected to screenings of these cut price knockabouts as examples of his work, as some friends of mine discovered when they invited him to front this feeble second feature.

Decades after his death he has, of course, been justified by the recovery of his lost LIFE OF DAVID LLOYD GEORGE, and the dusting off of his twenties HINDLE WAKES, allowed to molder on archive shelves during his lifetime - the two most imposing British silent films known.

It was outrageous that the British film industry was unable to find a better use for the maker than this un-funny stage hit with an ugliness that extended beyond its wallpapered decors into its depiction of a returned soldier bread winner rejected by his family for not being able to advance their living standard until he receives a legacy which make him the head of the house rather than the spiv war time tenant.

Plot strands appear and vanish abruptly. Marx Brothers gags are re-staged weakly and only Diana Dors, plausible as the British blonde bombshell daughter, generates any interest. We can see elements of HINDLE WAKES in the brief downwards shots of the Palais dancing or the milk man starting the day on the terrace street but the film is without any of the feeling of community - both oppressive and supporting which made the earlier film remarkable.

Elvey brings some smoothness to the staging but is defeated by poor studio matching and his undistinguished cast and crew.


8 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 2 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

What Is Katee Sackhoff Watching?

Katee Sackhoff shares her Watchlist and love for the CW drama "Reign" with "The IMDb Show." Plus, we take a look at the top 10 TV Shows of 2017.

Watch now