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Moulin Rouge (1952) Poster

(1952)

Trivia

Walking on his knees had the unfortunate side-effect of making José Ferrer six inches shorter than Henri Toulouse Lautrec's real height of 5'1".
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This film and Baz Luhrmann's Moulin Rouge! (2001) won the same Academy Awards: Art Direction and Costume Design.
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Claude Nollier was only 32 when she played José Ferrer's mother.
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Tall actor José Ferrer was transformed into the short artist Toulouse-Lautrec by the use of camera angles, makeup, costume, concealed pits and platforms and short body doubles. Ferrer also used a set of special knee pads of his own design which allowed him to walk on his knees with his lower legs strapped to his upper body. He suffered extreme pain and could only use them for short periods of time. The cane he used in most of his scenes was of absolute necessity. This fact was covered in a LIFE magazine story in 1952.
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John Huston only finished the final edit hours before the film's December premiere to qualify it for Academy Award consideration.
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Artist Marcel Vertès, whose hand is seen making "Lautrec" drawings, paid part of his tuition in art school by forging and selling "Lautrec" drawings.
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Zsa Zsa Gabor's singing was dubbed by Muriel Smith.
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Much of the cinematography was intended to resemble the poster art of Toulouse-Lautrec. Some of the costumes and character makeup also paid homage to his poster art.
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A famous story came up during the filming was that after Technicolor came out with the dailies according to legendary cinematographer Oswald Morris' specifications, the lab management confronted Morris and John Huston over the dailies claiming that it was faulty. Huston and Morris viewed it in a theater at which point Huston allegedly turned to Morris and said, "What do you think, Os?" To which he replied, "Exactly as I wanted it." Huston replied, "Me too." They then turned to the Technicolor management with, "Gentlemen, thank you and f**k you!" After the film was released, it became a personal favorite of Technicolor inventor Herbert Kalmus.
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Original DOP Otto Heller was replaced by Oswald Morris.
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In the mid 70's, producer Lew Grade tried to get John Huston to direct a " Moulin Rouge " miniseries with Omar Sharif and Jill Ireland.
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Film debut of Colette Marchand.
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The first film of Maureen Swanson.
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First film of Sir Christopher Rhodes.
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The first film of Lee Montague.
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Finnish censorship visa # 39052 delivered on 6-9-1953.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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