The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) - News Poster

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A Fish Called Wanda Available on Blu-ray October 3rd from Arrow Video

“The funniest movie I have seen in a long time” – Roger Ebert

A Fish Called Wanda will be available on Blu-ray October 3rd from Arrow Video

In 1988, John Cleese, former Python and the mastermind behind Fawlty Towers, teamed up with the veteran Ealing Comedy director Charles Crichton (The Lavender Hill Mob) to produce another classic of British comedy.

Cleese plays Archie Leach, a weak-willed barrister who finds himself embroiled with a quartet of ill-matched jewel thieves – two American con artists played by Jamie Lee Curtis and Kevin Kline, Michael Palin’s animal-loving hitman and London gangster Tom Georgeson – when Georgeson is arrested. Only he and Palin know the whereabouts of the diamonds, prompting plenty of farce and in-fighting as well as some embarrassing nudity and the unfortunate demise of some innocent pooches…

Nominated for three Academy Awards and winning one for Kline’s outstanding supporting turn as the psychopathic Otto,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Logan Lucky': The Six Things You Need to Make a Perfect Heist Film

'Logan Lucky': The Six Things You Need to Make a Perfect Heist Film
Head to the movies this weekend to see Logan Lucky, and you'll see more than Steven Soderbergh ending his moviemaking retirement phase and returning to the big screen. (You've been greatly missed, sir.) You'll see more than just Channing Tatum and Adam Driver playing down-on-their-luck Southern brothers who hatch a plan to rob the Charlotte Motor Speedway. You'll even see more than Daniel Craig sporting a bottle-blond crop-cut hairdo and Seth MacFarlane sporting something on his head that looks like a cross between a mullet, a Jheri curl and roadkill.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Forgotten: Seth Holt's "Station Six - Sahara" (1963)

  • MUBI
Seth Holt is an odd figure. An editor at first, his career spans classic Ealing comedies (The Lavender Hill Mob, 1951) and gritty kitchen sink drama (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, 1960), while his overlapping career as producer saw him preside over the classic The Ladykillers (1955). On becoming a director, he worked mainly at Hammer, which made radically different content from Ealing but perhaps shared the same cozy atmosphere.Taste of Fear (a.k.a. Scream of Fear, 1961) is a zestful Diabolique knock-off, while The Nanny (1965) continued Bette Davis' career in horror. It's incredibly strong, beautifully made and quite ruthless: Bette referred to Holt as "a mountain of evil" and found him the most demanding director she'd encountered since William Wyler. During the daft but enjoyably peculiar Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971), Holt developed a persistent case of hiccups that turned the screening of rushes into hilarious occasions. Then he dropped dead of a heart attack,
See full article at MUBI »

Deadline – U.S.A.

Richard Brooks' exciting Humphrey Bogart picture is one of the best newspaper sagas ever. An editor deals with a gangster threat and a domestic crisis even as greedy heirs are selling his paper out from under him. Commentator Eddie Muller drives home the film's essential civics lesson about what we've lost -- a functioning free press. Deadline - U.S.A. Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1952 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date July 26, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Ethel Barrymore, Kim Hunter, Ed Begley, Warren Stevens, Paul Stewart, Martin Gabel, Joe De Santis, Audrey Christie, Jim Backus, Willis Bouchey, Joseph Crehan, Lawrence Dobkin, John Doucette, Paul Dubov, William Forrest, Dabbs Greer, Thomas Browne Henry, Paul Maxey, Ann McCrea, Kasia Orzazewski, Tom Powers, Joe Sawyer, William Self, Phillip Terry, Carleton Young. Cinematography Milton Krasner Film Editor William B.Murphy Original Music Cyril J. Mockridge Produced by Sol C. Siegel
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Weekly Rushes. 24 February 2016

  • MUBI
Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSThai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, whose brilliant Cemetery of Splendor will be released in the Us this spring, has revealed a new installation work, Home Movie, made for Sydney's 2016 Biennale. According to his website, "an exhibition space hosts a cave-like ritual where people gather to simply take in the light": "In this home-cave, the heat is both comfortable and threatening. A fireball is an organic-like machine with phantom fans to blow away the heat and, at the same time, rouse the fire, which is impossible to put out even in dreams."This season seems to be one of cinema masters passing. In addition to the directors who've died over the last month, we've lost two great cinematographers this week. First, Douglas Slocombe, who shot the first three Indian Jones films,
See full article at MUBI »

Raiders of the Lost Ark cinematographer Douglas Slocombe dies aged 103

The three-time Oscar nominee is best known for shooting the first three Indiana Jones films and nearly all the classic Ealing comedies

Raiders of the Lost Ark cinematographer Douglas Slocombe has died aged 103 in London.

The Oscar-nominated British director of photography is best known for shooting the first three Indiana Jones films in the 1980s, and nearly all the classic comedies produced by London-based Ealing Studios, including Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951). In total, he shot 80 films.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Douglas Slocombe, ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ Cinematographer, Dies at 103

  • The Wrap
Douglas Slocombe, ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ Cinematographer, Dies at 103
Douglas Slocombe, the cinematographer for “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” has died. He was 103. According to Afp, his daughter Georgina confirmed his death. Slocombe received Oscar nominations for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He also shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball,” as well as Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in The White Suit.” Also Read: Harper Lee, 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Author, Dies at 89 “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989) as the last film he worked on.
See full article at The Wrap »

Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103

Douglas Slocombe, Cinematographer for ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ Dies at 103
Oscar-nominated British cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, whose many films include several classic Ealing comedies in the 1940s and ’50s and the first three Indiana Jones pics in the 1980s, has died, his family told the Agence France-Presse. He was 103.

Slocombe drew Oscar noms for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He is famous within the industry for never having used a light meter on the set of “Raiders.”

He shot Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in the White Suit.”

During the 1960s he was d.p. on films including “The Servant,” “The Blue Max,” “The Fearless Vampire Killers,” “The Lion in Winter” and “The Italian Job.”

In addition to the pics for which he was Oscar nominated, he shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball” in the 1970s.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leigh Day on TCM: From Southern Belle in 'Controversial' Epic to Rape Victim in Code-Buster

Vivien Leigh ca. late 1940s. Vivien Leigh movies: now controversial 'Gone with the Wind,' little-seen '21 Days Together' on TCM Vivien Leigh is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 18, '15, as TCM's “Summer Under the Stars” series continues. Mostly a stage actress, Leigh was seen in only 19 films – in about 15 of which as a leading lady or star – in a movie career spanning three decades. Good for the relatively few who saw her on stage; bad for all those who have access to only a few performances of one of the most remarkable acting talents of the 20th century. This evening, TCM is showing three Vivien Leigh movies: Gone with the Wind (1939), 21 Days Together (1940), and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh won Best Actress Academy Awards for the first and the third title. The little-remembered film in-between is a TCM premiere. 'Gone with the Wind' Seemingly all
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Redford on TCM: Dismal 'Gatsby,' Oscar winner 'Africa'

Robert Redford: 'The Great Gatsby' and 'The Way We Were' tonight on Turner Classic Movies Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month Robert Redford returns this evening with three more films: two Sydney Pollack-directed efforts, Out of Africa and The Way We Were, and Jack Clayton's film version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel The Great Gatsby. (See TCM's Robert Redford film schedule below. See also: "On TCM: Robert Redford Movies.") 'The Great Gatsby': Robert Redford as Jay Gatsby Released by Paramount Pictures, the 1974 film version of The Great Gatsby had prestige oozing from just about every cinematic pore. The film was based on what some consider the greatest American novel ever written. Francis Ford Coppola, whose directing credits included the blockbuster The Godfather, and who, that same year, was responsible for both The Godfather Part II and The Conversation, penned the adaptation. Multiple Tony winner David Merrick (Becket,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Christmas TV movie guide: Tuesday, December 23 - Simpsons, Chicken Run

Watch the Digital Spy team discuss their favourite Christmas movies above, then find out the best films on TV today for your festive entertainment.

Bridge to Terabithia - 11am, BBC One

The Hunger Games' Josh Hutcherson stars as an awkward preteen in this fantasy film. When Jesse (Hutcherson) befriends Leslie, the new girl in school (AnnaSophia Robb), they imagine a whole new world to escape reality.

The Simpsons Movie - 11am, Film4

Homer and the gang make the transition to the big screen in this 2007 family flick. When pollution in the town reaches crisis level, Springfield's residents are confined to life within a government-sanctioned dome.

Chicken Run - 1.45pm, BBC One

In this comedy escape drama, the chickens, hens and roosters decide to rebel against farm owners Mr and Ms Tweedy, before they end up in tomorrow's meat pie. Mel Gibson stars as newcomer Rocky the Rooster.

The Lavender Hill Mob - 2.35pm,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Steven Soderbergh Recuts 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' as Silent Film

  • MovieWeb
Steven Soderbergh Recuts 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' as Silent Film
While it may be some time before we see a new film from "retired" director Steven Soderbergh, his latest experiment on the website Extension765.com may be the closest thing we get. The filmmaker posted a new black and white "silent" cut of the 1981 classic Raiders of the Lost Ark, which has absolutely no dialogue, but does feature music from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross scores for The Social Network and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Earlier this year, he cut together mash-ups of both the original version of Psycho and the 1998 remake on the website.

Click on the image below to watch the 115-minute video in its entirety, then take a look at Steven Soderbergh's statement about why he made Raiders of the Lost Ark a silent film.

"(Note: This posting is for educational purposes only.)

I'm assuming the phrase "staging" came out of the theatre world,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bill Hader’s List of 200 Essential Comedies Everyone Should See

Bill Hader has come a long way since his stint on Saturday Night Live, creating many popular characters and impersonations such as Stefon, Vincent Price and CNN’s Jack Cafferty. He is one of the highlights in such films as Adventureland, Knocked Up, Superbad and Pineapple Express, and so it is easy to see why author Mike Sacks interviewed him for his new book Poking A Dead Frog. In it, Hader talks about his career and he also lists 200 essential movies every comedy writer should see. Xo Jane recently published the list for those of us who haven’t had a chance to read the book yet. There are a ton of great recommendations and plenty I haven’t yet seen, but sadly my favourite comedy of all time isn’t mentioned. That would be Some Like It Hot. Still, it really is a great list with a mix of old and new.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Audrey Hepburn's 85th birthday: Google pays tribute to Hollywood's fair lady

Today would have been Audrey Hepburn's 85th birthday, as recognised by Google's doodle. After a bizarre and traumatic childhood she went on to be a Hollywood great. We profile a singular star

It used to be said that you can't be too rich or too thin. We now no longer believe this. Bankers and hedge fund managers are too rich; and now the celebrity magazines and tabloids lead the choruses of "Look how skinny's she's got!" The nicer way of saying the same thing, and making it a compliment, is to call the person elegant.

Audrey Hepburn came to be synonymous with this form of elegance. Even in her early films, her height, her skinniness and her wistfulness combined to get her noticed. In the unhelpful role of Chiquita in The Lavender Hill Mob, she attracts the attention both of Alec Guinness and of the camera: a woman visually
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

A Fish Called Wanda

A comic crime caper stuffed with eccentric supporting characters, A Fish Called Wanda is in the best tradition of British comedies like The Lavender Hill Mob. That should be no surprise because the director, Charles Crichton, is responsible for both. Crichton’s amazing career began in the thirties as an editor on Things To Come and Thief Of Bagdad and ended in 1998 with Wanda, co-written with star John Cleese. The film was enormously successful winning an Academy Award for co-star Kevin Kline and BAFTA Awards for Cleese and Michael Palin for Best Actor and Supporting Actor.

The post A Fish Called Wanda appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review: 'Ealing Studios Collection: Vol. 1'

  • CineVue
★★★★★Collated for the first time on Blu-ray are three films from Britain's Ealing Studios, each starring its most renowned star, Alec Guinness. In Kind Hearts and Coronets' (1949), lowly sales assistant Louis Mazzini (Dennis Price) reeks terrible revenge on his mother's aristocratic relations the D'Ascoyne family (all played by Guinness), whilst The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) tells the story of Henry Holland (Guinness) an unassuming clerk at the Bank of England who plots to relieve his bosses of a small fortune. Finally in The Man in the White Suit (1951) humble inventor Henry Stratton (Guinness) creates a fibre which never gets dirty or wears out.
See full article at CineVue »

The Ealing Studios Collection Vol. 1 Blu-ray Review

Directors: Robert Hamer, Charles Crichton, Alexander Mackendrick

Starring: Alec Guinness, Dennis Price, Stanley Holloway, Joan Greenwood, Valerie Hobson, Sid James, Alfie Bass, Cecil Parker, Michael Gough

Running Time: 272 Minutes

Certificate: U

Ealing comedies are so wonderful aren’t they? Transporting us back to post-war Britain at a time when it seemed much easier to mix darkness and comedy. This collection of three films, each starring Alec Guinness (one of which stars him 8 times), is a reminder of the incredible talent and unique tone that British films once possessed. Not only does each film deliver the laughs and the more sinister plotlines, but they also make interesting observations on society.

Kind Hearts And Coronets sees a man kill his way through his estranged family in order to inherit the family title and see his mother buried in the family graveyard. Dennis Price takes the lead as the sociopathic and righteous Louis
See full article at The Hollywood News »

How video games are transforming the film industry

At one time it was the game industry that wanted to emulate films. But now the movie industry is adopting the technology of video games

Amid the debate about television stealing the film industry's thunder, another entertainment form has crept up unnoticed, further threatening Hollywood's creative hegemony: video games. With a new, much more powerful generation of games consoles poised to arrive – Microsoft's Xbox One goes on sale on Friday, with Sony's PlayStation 4 due a week later – the games companies reckon they finally have the ammunition to shake off the perception that their digital epics are inferior to movies.

I'm in a place that could not reinforce that impression more emphatically: the historic Ealing studios, where classics such as The Lavender Hill Mob and The Ladykillers were filmed. But I'm here to experience the process of making a video game called Ryse: Son of Rome, an epic tale charting the Roman conquest of Britain,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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