IMDb > The Lavender Hill Mob (1951)
The Lavender Hill Mob
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The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
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Popularity: ?
Up 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
T.E.B. Clarke (original screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Lavender Hill Mob on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
10 September 1951 (Sweden) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
He stole $3,000,000 in gold and that's a lot of BULLion! See more »
Plot:
A meek bank clerk who oversees the shipment of bullion joins with an eccentric neighbor to steal gold bars and smuggle them out of the country as miniature Eiffel Towers. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 3 wins & 4 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(54 articles)
Deadline – U.S.A.
 (From Trailers from Hell. 2 September 2016, 1:44 PM, PDT)

Weekly Rushes. 24 February 2016
 (From MUBI. 27 February 2016, 1:47 PM, PST)

Raiders of the Lost Ark cinematographer Douglas Slocombe dies aged 103
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 22 February 2016, 1:15 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
Funny, at times hilarious. See more (63 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Alec Guinness ... Holland

Stanley Holloway ... Pendlebury
Sidney James ... Lackery
Alfie Bass ... Shorty
Marjorie Fielding ... Mrs. Chalk
Edie Martin ... Miss Evesham
John Salew ... Parkin

Ronald Adam ... Turner
Arthur Hambling ... Wallis
Gibb McLaughlin ... Godwin

John Gregson ... Farrow
Clive Morton ... Station Sergeant
Sydney Tafler ... Clayton
Marie Burke ... Senora Gallardo

Audrey Hepburn ... Chiquita
William Fox ... Gregory
Michael Trubshawe ... British Ambassador
Ann Heffernan ... Kiosk Girl
Jacques B. Brunius ... Customs Official (as Jacques Brunius)
Eugene Deckers ... Customs Official
Paul Demel ... Customs Official
Andreas Malandrinos ... Customs Official (as Andrea Malandrinos)
Cyril Chamberlain ... Commander
Tony Quinn ... Deputy Commander
Moultrie Kelsall ... Detective Superintendant

Christopher Hewett ... Inspector Talbot
Meredith Edwards ... P.C. Williams

Patrick Barr ... Divisional Detective Inspector
David Davies ... City Policeman
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alanna Boyce ... June Edwards (uncredited)
Johnny Briggs ... Small Role (uncredited)

Peter Bull ... Joe the Gab (uncredited)
Jacques Cey ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Joe Clarke ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Robert Coote ... Waiter in Restaurant (uncredited)
Jacqueline Curtis ... Schoolgirl (uncredited)
Richard Davies ... Police Driver (uncredited)
Patric Doonan ... Craggs (uncredited)
Archie Duncan ... Chief Cashier (uncredited)
Frank Forsyth ... Minor Role (uncredited)

Patricia Garwood ... Girl (uncredited)
Fred Griffiths ... Taxi Driver (uncredited)
Charles Lamb ... Mr. Richards (uncredited)

Desmond Llewelyn ... Customs Officer (uncredited)
Arthur Mullard ... 1st Man in Police Identity Parade (uncredited)
Marie Ney ... School Headmistress (uncredited)
Frederick Piper ... Cafe Owner (uncredited)
Ernie Rice ... Man at Races (uncredited)

Robert Shaw ... Chemist at Police Exhibition (uncredited)
Valerie Singleton ... Girl (uncredited)
John Warwick ... Police Inspector at Squad Car Headquarters (uncredited)
Richard Wattis ... Opposition MP (uncredited)
Neil Wilson ... Squad Car Headquarters PC (uncredited)

Directed by
Charles Crichton 
 
Writing credits
T.E.B. Clarke (original screenplay)

Produced by
Michael Balcon .... producer
Michael Truman .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Georges Auric 
 
Cinematography by
Douglas Slocombe (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Seth Holt 
 
Casting by
Margaret Harper Nelson (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
William Kellner 
 
Costume Design by
Anthony Mendleson 
 
Makeup Department
Ernest Taylor .... makeup artist
Harry Wilton .... makeup artist (as H. Wilton)
Barbara Barnard .... hairdressing supervisor (uncredited)
Daphne Martin .... assistant hair stylist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Slim Hand .... unit production manager
Hal Mason .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Norman Priggen .... assistant director
John Meadows .... second assistant director (uncredited)
Jim O'Connolly .... third assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
G. Beavan .... floor props (uncredited)
Bert Davey .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Wally Hill .... floor props (uncredited)
Fred Lacey .... production buyer (uncredited)
Andrew Low .... set dresser (uncredited)
George Speller .... construction manager (uncredited)
Bob Tull .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Stephen Dalby .... sound supervisor
Les Hammond .... recordist (as Leslie Hammond)
Robert R. Healy .... assistant boom operator (uncredited)
Eric Stockl .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Cyril Swern .... boom operator (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Sydney Pearson .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Geoffrey Dickinson .... special processes
Bryan Langley .... special processes
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Geoffrey Faithfull .... additional photography (as Geoffrey Faithful)
Jeff Seaholme .... camera operator
Jack Dooley .... still photographer (uncredited)
Jack Ford .... chief electrician (uncredited)
Bob Penn .... floor stills (uncredited)
Michael Shepherd .... clapper loader (uncredited)
Bert Spurgeon .... floor electrician (uncredited)
Hugh Wilson .... focus puller (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Muriel Cole .... crowd casting (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Ernie Farrer .... wardrobe master (uncredited)
Ben Foster .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
Lily Payne .... wardrobe mistress (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Harry Aldous .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Barbara Bennett .... assembly editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Ernest Irving .... conductor
 
Other crew
Phyllis Crocker .... continuity
Baynham Honri .... studio manager (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
78 min | UK:81 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Gaumont Kalee) (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:G | Finland:K-16 | Iceland:L | Netherlands:AL (original rating) (1951) | Sweden:15 | UK:U | UK:U (tv rating) | UK:U (video rating) (1988) | USA:Approved (MPAA rating: certificate #15054)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Ealing Studios, planning a bank-robbery film, asked the Bank of England to devise a way in which a million pounds could be stolen from the bank. A special committee was created to come up with an idea, and their plan is the one used in the film.See more »
Goofs:
Errors made by characters (possibly deliberate errors by the filmmakers): During the chase, the license plate on the armored truck is LKL238. The police officer correctly reports the license plate as LKL238. However, when the dispatcher repeats the license plate, he says LKL638.See more »
Quotes:
Mrs. Chalk:But surely you must have some suspicion. Who work the heist rackets in this territory?
Policeman:Beg your pardon, lady?
Mrs. Chalk:Oh really! I can't make myself much plainer. Which hoodlums around here specialize in toby jobs?
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Rumba RioSee more »

FAQ

The girls in school are singing a song that Stanley Holloway later sings in "The Titfield Thunderbolt." Does anyone recognize it?
How are the Lavender Hill Mob caught?
See more »
25 out of 28 people found the following review useful.
Funny, at times hilarious., 18 January 2005
Author: Robert J. Maxwell (rmax304823@yahoo.com) from Deming, New Mexico, USA

Ealing Studios turned out a series of comic gems in the late 40s and early 50s and this is a good example. Only a curmudgeon would not laugh aloud during some of the scenes.

The plot, briefly, involves a clever bank clerk (Guiness) developing a plan with a die caster (Holloway) to steal several million pounds of gold bullion, recast it into tourist knicknacks in the shape of Eiffel Tower paperweights, and ship it to Paris to sell on the black market. They recruit two professional thieves to help them.

It may not be Ealing's best comedy (my vote would be for "The Lady Killers") but it's more than funny enough. I'll just give three scenes as examples.

(1) Holloway and Guiness, two honest men, need to recruit what they call a "mob" but have no idea how to go about it. What I mean is -- how would YOU go about recruiting criminal assistants? What they do is go to crowded places of low repute -- saloons, prize fights, the underground -- and shout at each other through the noise about the safe being broken at such-and-such an address and all that money having to be left in it. Then they hole up at the address and wait for the burglars to arrive.

(2) A scene at the Eiffel Tower in which they discover that half a dozen of the gold paperweights instead of the usual leaden ones have been sold to some English schoolgirls. They watch horrified as the door closes and the elevator carrying the girls begins its descent, and they decide to rush down the tightly spiraling staircase to ground level, trying to beat the elevator. By the time they reach the street they've been spun around so many times that they can't stop laughing and are unable to stop twirling around until they fall down.

(3) After the robbery, in an empty warehouse soon to be searched by the police, Guiness must be tied up, gagged, and blindfolded with tape. Then his clothes must be torn and dirtied so that it appears he put up a fight before the gold was taken. But the police arrive too soon, and the others beat it, leaving Guiness standing alone, tied up, and blindfolded, but not dirty. He stumbles about blindly, trying to blow the tape from his mouth, getting his feet caught in discarded bicycle wheels, until he falls into the Thames.

Probably the weakest part of the movie is near the end, when police cars wind up chasing one another because of confusing messages. The scene could have been lifted from Laurel and Hardy. It's a little silly. (Why didn't Guiness and Holloway park the stolen car, get out, and walk away?) But that's a minor consideration.

What surprises me about some of these comedies is that they're able to make us laugh despite the dreary atmosphere. The streets of London look awfully dismal in this grainy black and white film. Some of them were still charred wrecks left over from the Blitz. But it doesn't dampen the comedy at all. Following the successful robbery a drunken Guiness and Holloway return to their boarding house to be chided by their landlady for being "naughty". One pulls the other aside, chuckling conspiratorially, and the two agree to call each other "Al" and "Dutch" -- two REAL BIG gangsters for you.

If you need to use up some neuropeptides this is your movie.

Was the above review useful to you?
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